Definition of aristo in English:



  • informal term for aristocrat
    • ‘Now the aristos and film idols have been joined by sports stars.’
    • ‘That's another word that English aristos are fond of.’
    • ‘The beginning of the winter brought a new season of parties and gatherings with which the aristos sought to dispel the gloominess of this permanently twilit world.’
    • ‘The side chapels were deserted, save for an elderly aristo woman who knelt on an embroidered hassock, chanting her rosary as she strung the beads along the string.’
    • ‘Compiled largely by go-getting 17 th-century Lothian-based aristo Lady Jean Campbell, the Panmure Collection was rediscovered in the 1930s, replete with rare examples of English, French and Scottish works.’
    • ‘My mother then died when I was eight and I was sent to work for aristos.’
    • ‘But just as the finishing line came into view, the Basque boys began to falter, and the arrogant aristos of Madrid brought their skills to bear.’
    • ‘This is an aristo with a rebellious streak - a ‘practical radical’ who relieves the super-rich of their cash and redistributes it among the lower orders.’
    • ‘Being the beginning of the Season in society circles, all the aristos from the countryside were trickling through the city gates in their carriages.’
    • ‘Certainly the aristos from the centre of Spain are more proficient at handling trophies.’
    • ‘I told the aristo it had been nice knowing him (he didn't look as panicked as he did when his dinner plate was nearly empty), got the next train to London and went to the Candy Bar.’
    • ‘Most of these films starred Christopher Lee as the blood-crazed aristo with the neurotic-looking Peter Cushing as his nemesis, Doctor Van Helsing.’
    • ‘Benjamin, his sleuth hero, has his nose put out of joint when his fortune-teller sister, Therse, announces her engagement to Marie-Colbert, a rich aristo.’
    • ‘The eldest of six sisters, Nancy was born into a family of cash-strapped aristos in 1904.’
    • ‘At the top table are the ‘hereditaries’, the half dozen Scots aristos who inherited their roles from their parents and who will pass them on to their offspring.’
    • ‘Classy, multi-roomed restaurant-club-bar in famous Cavendish Square, set in an elegant Grade II listed building that will have you wishing you were a landed aristo.’
    • ‘To be sure, you don't have to be an aristo to become president.’
    • ‘Her fortune set him up as a dealer who did a lucrative trade with French aristos desperate to sell their pictures.’
    • ‘Why are the cream of Britain's aristos heading to Argentina in search of polo?’
    • ‘I am sure that they are not the aloof, unfeeling, aristos that some would have us believe.’