Definition of appetite in English:

appetite

noun

  • 1usually in singular A natural desire to satisfy a bodily need, especially for food.

    ‘he has a healthy appetite’
    ‘they suffered from loss of appetite’
    • ‘Now, it is true that virtue and chastity are not the same thing but, like any of the natural appetites, a question of moderation is involved.’
    • ‘They both have very healthy appetites, due to the fact they enjoy their food.’
    • ‘Apparently, some people even lose their appetites if otherwise good food is served with an unexpected color.’
    • ‘Activity that expresses the virtue of moderation is also excellent activity when it comes to the bodily appetites.’
    • ‘While hunger and appetite are often experienced together, when we are hungry and want a particular food, appetites for foods can occur in the absence of hunger.’
    • ‘Perhaps it is down to all the steroid hormones pumped into livestock to make them bigger in order to satisfy our insatiable appetites for dead animal.’
    • ‘As a taster of what's to come, this comes close to completely satisfying the appetite.’
    • ‘Just at this time he made a discovery that helped him satisfy their new appetite for solid food.’
    • ‘It was delicious and just enough to satisfy my appetite while not being too filling.’
    • ‘The selection of salads and potato dishes on offer does not sound substantial enough to satisfy big appetites.’
    • ‘Another one is control of our bodily appetites and thoughts, which we're not so good at, these days.’
    • ‘Since they saw no contradiction between bodily appetites and godliness they would be relaxed about the display of sexual characteristics like the beard.’
    • ‘And we could have sliced the cost in half by cutting out such things as starters, and still have emerged our appetites pleasantly satisfied.’
    • ‘They believed that following our natural appetites is a generally reliable guide to living well.’
    • ‘These characters will do anything to satisfy their appetites, whether for food, drink, or sex.’
    • ‘We can choose to satisfy out appetites with healthy food, eating when we are hungry and stopping when we are full.’
    • ‘Dressed only in towelling robes, we began to snack on some food to fuel our appetites: peanut butter on toast for him, Marmite sandwich for me.’
    • ‘They had to collect six trucks of grass every day to satisfy the appetites of their cows.’
    • ‘The museum claimed to serve the cause of moral reformation, but it really worked on base emotions and bodily appetites.’
    • ‘Nor did such foods come into prevalence because of natural human appetites.’
    hunger, ravenousness, hungriness, need for food
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A strong desire or liking for something.
      ‘an unquenchable appetite for life’
      • ‘Rather something arouses us and accustoms our appetites and our desires to that which expands our longing.’
      • ‘There is clearly an appetite and demand from the public for access to private historic houses.’
      • ‘He had a great appetite for working on the land and was in ready demand around the locality.’
      • ‘In Scotland this appetite for debate is as strong as elsewhere in Britain.’
      • ‘Did the film whet your appetite for another long, epic story of love, loyalty and bloody warfare?’
      • ‘Of course, to be patient, you have to have a long investing horizon and an appetite for some risk.’
      • ‘If television is anything to go by, there seems to be a huge appetite for shows about the love lives of rich New Yorkers.’
      • ‘There is an appetite for a balance between both strong leadership and a democratic system.’
      • ‘He had an immense appetite for life and loved gadgetry of all sorts, especially cars and boats.’
      • ‘His appetites in the energy sector and his ambitions to restore his positions in the gas business might have lead to the event as of Friday.’
      • ‘Perhaps then their appetite for loud and highly dangerous explosions would be satisfied.’
      • ‘The strong appetite for a piece of Ireland was often shallow, faddish and dishonest.’
      • ‘The two nations' appetites for oil are burgeoning, demanding more and more from the world's oil wells.’
      • ‘Ironically, Australians love to watch sport but they are losing their appetite to play it.’
      • ‘This number and the whole evening satisfied appetites for thoughtful music and left people hungry for more.’
      • ‘His positioning was faultless and his appetite for pain and mayhem truly awesome.’
      • ‘Maybe that explains her passion for fine red wines and her insatiable appetite for weirdness of all flavors.’
      • ‘Ever longed for that in-between meals treat, but don't want to ruin a healthy appetite for punk rock?’
      • ‘One had appetites and ambitions, talents and desires, capacities and potential, drive and vision, questions and curiosity.’
      • ‘Kicking off the summer dance season this week are two festivals that will satisfy even the most insatiable of dance appetites.’
      craving, longing, yearning, hankering, hunger, thirst, passion, relish, lust, love, zest, gusto, avidity, ardour
      View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from Old French apetit (modern appétit), from Latin appetitus ‘desire for’, from appetere ‘seek after’, from ad- ‘to’ + petere ‘seek’.

Pronunciation

appetite

/ˈæpəˌtaɪt//ˈapəˌtīt/