Main definitions of appellation in US English:

: appellation1appellation2

appellation1

noun

formal
  • 1A name or title.

    ‘the city fully justifies its appellation “the Pearl of the Orient.”’
    • ‘The women's squads voted in 1989 to adopt the name as well, abandoning their former appellation, Gussies.’
    • ‘He also pointed out the quite strict rules which apply to names, appellations, etc.’
    • ‘Whenever the author mentioned someone in the article, she went to lengths to note her race, always with some appellation like ‘Asian-American.’’
    • ‘‘Akishino’ and ‘Nori’ are more formal appellations used only with the titles ‘prince’ or ‘princess’.’
    • ‘This apparently was its original name, ‘Gold Coast’ being only its British colonial appellation.’
    • ‘Worse still (‘mate’ being a pretty working-class appellation, after all), is this a symptom of snobbery which my school, despite my best efforts, succeeded in indoctrinating me with?’
    • ‘Those letters can be the initials of a first or a last name (of a person or a pet), or can represent a title or any other appellation.’
    • ‘In this case, that means that lying, disobedience to your parents, and covetousness could all qualify me or you for that appellation.’
    • ‘Frown would have been a more appropriate appellation had this charmingly unique collection been allowed to languish unfinished.’
    • ‘In debates throughout the 1990s, ‘Central’ gradually became the politically correct appellation for this part of the world.’
    • ‘While it may be tempting to call this a folk record, its instrumentation is generally too ornate for that genre appellation.’
    • ‘This of course is not a name for a child to use, but a suitable appellation will reveal itself.’
    • ‘But while most cats shared the simple appellation, miu, some people took names from cats.’
    • ‘Even the word ‘coke’ has become a generic term, far better known and certainly more descriptive than any other soft drink appellation.’
    • ‘Twenty-two out of 39 listed companies that changed their names last year picked new appellations that included e-this or cyber-that or somethingdotcom.’
    • ‘I had always called my parents' friends by their first names - heck, I called my parents by their first names, but somehow Mrs. B's Christian appellation never fell trippingly from my lips.’
    • ‘Beware of people claiming supernatural powers, and of those that try to impress you with pompous titles and appellations.’
    • ‘There had been some disputes about the appellation of the monetary unit but the name ‘lev’ (in Bulgarian lev is the old word for lion) was adopted by the majority.’
    • ‘She had wanted her cat to be known by a less common appellation.’
    • ‘Here in America, of course, nobody but politicians gets any summer vacation worthy of that appellation.’
    name, title, designation, denomination, honorific, tag, epithet, label, sobriquet, byname, nickname
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The action of giving a name to a person or thing.
      • ‘After that Festus had sent the apostle Paul to Rome after his appellation made at Cesarea.’
      • ‘Some, however, felt that appellation would give the Republican ships preeminence.’
      • ‘The reason for this appellation was that they were not only called out when fire broke out, but also when any kind of accident occured.’
      • ‘How useful is this appellation of ‘science’, for it dresses up so much religious indoctrination as ‘secular education’.’

Origin

Late Middle English: via Old French from Latin appellatio(n-), from the verb appellare (see appeal).

Pronunciation

appellation

/ˌapəˈlāSHən//ˌæpəˈleɪʃən/

Main definitions of appellation in US English:

: appellation1appellation2

appellation2

noun

  • 1An appellation contrôlée.

    • ‘Although AOC is often a sign of quality, other products don't carry the appellation, since they may be made in a neighboring region, or a slightly larger size, or stirred a few more times than the regulations allow during production.’
    • ‘in France, the modern trend of blending is evident, hence the Vin de Pays d' Oc appellation that allows wines to be blended from the entire southern regions of Languedoc and Roussillon.’
    • ‘We feel that any wine label using the word Napa, Napa Valley or any of the appellations should use Napa grapes.’
    • ‘The most basic of all Burgundy appellations, this designation can be used anywhere throughout the region.’
    • ‘The Australian wine industry has already started to promote themselves in terms of appellations.’
    • ‘Every year you'll be presented with a seemingly endless stream of new wines, producers, appellations and vintages.’
    • ‘She argues persuasively that the story of how champagne became an appellation is also a story about what it means to be French.’
    • ‘With 466 wine appellations right now in France, not only is it difficult for consumers to keep track of them but the AOC grade has clearly not saved the skin of many producers who make wine that has no commercial market.’
    • ‘One of a first-rate series of wines from Burgundy, all sold under the Blason de Bourgogne label, this Mconnais white outperforms its appellation.’
    • ‘Reserve wines can be either of declared geographical origin, or of controlled appellation of origin.’
    • ‘The broad Southeastern Australia appellation does not mean a wine is made from lesser grapes; it means that grapes came from multiple sources within this region.’
    • ‘Even the quality control system is fairly random, with the DOC (Denominazione de Origine Controllata) appellation not much of a guarantee of how good the wine is.’
    • ‘One of the benefits of all this change in France has been the improvement in the wines of many lesser appellations.’
    • ‘The generic Cotes du Rhone appellation was created in 1937 in the Rhone Valley and has grown into one of France's largest and best - known wine brands, producing some 27 million cases annually.’
    • ‘Though the San Joaquin Valley was once regarded as the stepchild of the wine industry, the Madera appellation is proudly displayed on labels today.’
    • ‘More than 24 brands of its white and red wines are of controlled appellations of origin.’
    • ‘The main players in the wine industry no doubt dismissed it without consideration because the château was unknown and the wine without an appellation.’
    1. 1.1 A wine bearing an appellation contrôlée.
      • ‘The torrid heat of the vintage actually enriched lesser red appellations and endowed them with abundant fruit and body.’
      • ‘Varietal labeling has been allowed in Alsace for appellation wines and a rule change will now take Alsace where most other appellations now must tread, that is to say, no mention of varietals on the front label.’
      • ‘Even today, as Pinot Beurot, it is sanctioned as an ingredient in most of Burgundy's red wine appellations and the occasional vine can still be found in some of the region's famous red wine vineyards.’
      • ‘Additionally, the floral and fruity red appellations Chinon and Bourgueil are produced from the Cabernet Franc grown in the region, with Chinon being the most common red wine of the whole valley.’
      • ‘The varieties of grape used for the production of the estate’s wines are Pinot noir for the red appellations, and Chardonnay and Aligoté for the white appellations.’
    2. 1.2 The district in which a wine bearing an appellation contrôlée is produced.
      • ‘It is a delectably complex blend of single malts from various appellations in Scotland.’
      • ‘The only way to become familiar with which grapes make up which Appellations is to research the appellation you are interested in.’
      • ‘The vineyards of these two appellations were planted with sauvignon blanc after being destroyed in the 19th century by phylloxera.’
      • ‘The vines for this masterpiece come from the fringes of the Valpolicella appellation, and produce a very rich and complex wine.’
      • ‘Chablis Grand Cru is the least Chablis-like wine produced in the appellation, particularly when mature.’
      • ‘Bight on Cabernet's heels are Merlot and, in the cooler, southern end of the valley (known as Carneros, an appellation Napa shares with Sonoma), Pinot Noir and Chardonnay.’
      • ‘Each page has neat little sections for you to write the characteristics of the wine (year, appellation, producer, price), your actual tasting notes, and food pairing suggestions.’
      • ‘From a great producer in one of the northern Rhône's most overlooked appellations, this is a spicy, violet perfumed Syrah with just a hint of oak.’
      • ‘At the summit of the Sauternes appellation is the world famous Chateau d' Yquem.’
      • ‘The revival of St Emilion first occurred in the 1930s with the demolition of geographical boundaries and recognition of Pomerol as an independent appellation.’
      • ‘Varietal-based labels also generally indicate appellations (though often in small type), sometimes right down to the name of the vineyard.’
      • ‘It is within the Bolgheri appellation, at the heart of which are the Sassacia vineyards.’
      • ‘But in these production areas regulation tends to be much looser so wines from the same appellation tend to have less in common.’
      • ‘Beaujolais is the most southerly of all the appellations of Burgundy.’
      • ‘However, the wine that comes from the Chablis appellation of France is dry.’
      • ‘The wines of the Sauternes appellation, at their best, are golden to orange marmalade in colour and possess a fabulous complex sweetness, without oiliness, sugary fatness or unctuousness.’
      • ‘Delicate reds, such as wines from France's Beaujolais and Chinon appellations, can often fulfil the role of a white wine, and vice versa.’
      • ‘Like Sauvignon Blanc, Sémillon is allowed in many other appellations for dry and sweet whites of South West France but is perhaps most notable in qualitative terms in Monbazillac.’
      • ‘Barrel samples of sweet wines from Sauternes and Barsac appellations have fared incredibly well in the barrel tasting of the 2001 vintage, which took place in Bordeaux just last March.’
      • ‘Meursault is the largest appellation of the four, and has the most variable - but also the most competitively priced - wines.’

Origin

Abbreviation of appellation (d'origine) contrôlée.

Pronunciation

appellation

/ɑpɛlɑˈsjɔn//äpeläˈsyôn/