Definition of anyone in US English:

anyone

pronoun

  • 1usually with negative or in questions Any person or people.

    ‘there wasn't anyone there’
    ‘does anyone remember him?’
    ‘I was afraid to tell anyone’
    • ‘All of them looked like they never again wanted to see pain inflicted on anyone.’
    • ‘Has anyone ever commented about the lack of people with disabilities in the programme?’
    • ‘So if anyone knows any TV producers pitch them the idea for me and point them in my direction.’
    • ‘My only hope is I can scrape through Christmas unscathed and not upset anyone too much.’
    • ‘It is not thought anyone was in the building, which was once a ballroom and Corn Exchange.’
    • ‘While she accepted she had to go, she said she had not deliberately misled anyone.’
    • ‘I've not noticed anyone admiring the muscles and shoulder aches that go with it too.’
    • ‘‘I didn't know anyone there,’ she once admitted.’
    • ‘If anyone has this piece, or remembers it better than me, feel free to put me right on this one.’
    • ‘Somehow, the kitchen would be full of fabulous food without anyone going to any effort.’
    • ‘If we employed anyone who wasn't family we would have to employ all sorts of safety measures.’
    • ‘If anyone wants to drive me to Bristol and back to see them in early May, I will buy their ticket to get in.’
    • ‘You should always ask for ID, and never let anyone into your home that you are not sure of.’
    • ‘If anyone has more information on the subject, please feel free to add links in the comments.’
    • ‘Last night Charlotte begged anyone who had a copy of the footage to come forward.’
    • ‘If they do not want to go out and meet anyone, someone may also be deputed to meet them.’
    • ‘The leaflets will remind pensioners never to open their doors to anyone they are unsure of.’
    • ‘Unfortunately, there didn't seem to be anyone around to pick up the phone.’
    • ‘If anyone remembers him or knew him, I would be very glad to hear from you as soon as possible.’
    • ‘This album is all kinds of good things and I would recommend it to anyone who likes lovely music.’
    anyone, anybody
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1without negative Used for emphasis.
      ‘anyone could do it’
      • ‘It's hard to imagine anyone ever getting quite so worked up over these new buses.’
      • ‘So hone your skills, get some samples and talk to anyone and everyone about what you can offer.’
      • ‘Alternatively, anyone can take part in the coffee morning and hold their own event.’
      • ‘Suffice it to say that Waugh might have trouble getting anyone to print his story today.’
      • ‘Nothing special, just the normal adjustments anyone has to make as the body gets older.’
      • ‘It is a shame it has to come to that before anyone realises how dangerous this road is.’
      • ‘Heskey's got the power and pace to frighten anyone but must remember it's not a crime to use it.’
      • ‘I enjoy travelling on fast roads with music blasting from the stereo as much as anyone else.’
      • ‘They seem to know better than anyone what this feels like, what we're going through.’
      • ‘Belfast are the strongest by far but, apart from them, anybody can beat anyone else.’
      • ‘I try to tell her that as she grows older her needs may be reduced but she is a woman who will not be told or driven by anyone.’
      • ‘More than anyone, he needs to get it together if he wants to win the competition.’
      • ‘Of course, the truth is that they have been part of it for as long as anyone can remember.’
      • ‘He wanted to find a way to bring down the cost of motoring so that anyone could do it.’
      • ‘Like anyone moving to the big bad world of a city, they have had to toughen up.’
      • ‘The danger now is that anyone who wants to change society will run a mile from active politics.’
      • ‘Francis had never been afraid of anyone for as long as I had known him, not even the oldest of the old.’
      • ‘Ducks have been part of the village scene in Bledington for as long as anyone can remember.’
      • ‘In her eleven years of life she has yet to be dominated by anyone or anything.’
      • ‘We respect the Brits more than anyone else, and this will take a long time to go.’
      • ‘Even a cursory look at the new science GCSE is enough to give anyone pause for thought.’
  • 2A person of importance or authority.

    ‘they are read by anyone who's anyone’
    • ‘Over the years, anyone who's anyone in the game has dropped by to play a round or two in the city.’
    • ‘Anyone who's anyone in the industry will be there!’

Usage

Any one is not the same as anyone, and the two forms should not be used interchangeably. Any one, meaning ‘any single (person or thing),’ is written as two words to emphasize singularity: any one of us could do the job; not more than ten new members are chosen in any one year. Otherwise it is written as one word: anyone who wants to come is welcome. Note that this distinction is structurally similar to, although not identical with, the difference between every day and everyday: see everyday

Phrases

  • be anyone's

    • informal (of a person) be open to sexual advances from anyone.

      ‘three drinks and he's anyone's’
      • ‘I can try to sum it up with: a couple of drinks and she's anyone's!’
      • ‘Give me a sandwich, a large vodka and non-stop football and I'm anyone's.’
      • ‘Put a woman with half a brain and a wallet of her own into the picture and superimpose the word "Independence" over the top and I'm anyone's.’
      • ‘I can drink most anything else, but three pints and I'm anyone's.’
      • ‘A couple of lager shandies and he's anyone's.’
  • anyone's game

    • An evenly balanced contest.

      ‘it was still anyone's game at halftime’
      • ‘Three minutes remained and it was anyone's game.’
      • ‘In the last five minutes, at 0-20 to 2-14, it was still anyone's game.’
      • ‘Although the trend toward inclusions and the current spike in coffee popularity is clear, it is anyone's game as to the next ‘must have’ innovative ice cream flavor.’
      • ‘Outside the top three, there is still the sense that it's anyone's game.’
      • ‘Other candidates have come to the fore revealing that the party nomination is really anyone's game.’
      • ‘At the start of the second half it was anyone's game and there were good passing exchanges on both sides.’
      • ‘Her analysis relies heavily on the misguided notion that it's all over when in fact, the Internet is still anyone's game.’
      • ‘With another 80 points up for grabs by the end of the year, it is still anyone's game between the top four cars.’
      • ‘I think it is still anyone's game for the taking.’
      • ‘I think it could be anyone's game, especially with the pitch being like it is.’

Pronunciation

anyone

/ˈenēˌwən//ˈɛniˌwən/