Definition of antipathy in English:

antipathy

noun

  • A deep-seated feeling of dislike; aversion.

    ‘his fundamental antipathy to capitalism’
    ‘a thinly disguised mutual antipathy’
    • ‘This was unusual, given conventional medicine's antipathy towards anything considered wacky or unprovable.’
    • ‘As is customary, much was made of the mutual antipathy between the two fighters in the run-up to the contest.’
    • ‘Webber got pregnant, although by the time the baby was born her antipathy towards him was so great she refused to put his name on the birth certificate.’
    • ‘Might it not, however, be more accurate to call it antipathy?’
    • ‘The only person I know who could afford to live in Japan for a stint returned home with an acute allergy and antipathy to fish.’
    • ‘This affects my entire perception of the city, filling me with disquiet, antipathy and even a certain revulsion.’
    • ‘Whatever the accuracy of those perceptions, the mutual antipathy is unspoken, but pervasive.’
    • ‘In my view, his condition will persist while he remains in conflict with the Force as his antipathy is now so deep-seated and consuming.’
    • ‘Mr Fowler's antipathy can be traced to his father, who fought in the First World War and was less than impressed by the French war leaders.’
    • ‘The wee Glasgow derby may lack the sectarian undertones of the big one, but it lacks none of the mutual antipathy.’
    • ‘This antipathy towards fiction is a little difficult to understand.’
    • ‘There were many strands of antipathy in his life, among which a dislike for children seems to have been a constant.’
    • ‘Still, there is plenty of blame on both sides of the Atlantic for this display of mutual antipathy.’
    • ‘Despite my antipathy to regular cleaning, I love intensive organizing and cleaning sessions.’
    • ‘Despite her antipathy towards MacKenzie, she may well have picked up pointers from him about how to manage journalists.’
    • ‘This should go down in the annals of history, as I've never enjoyed doing a job before, managing at best antipathy.’
    • ‘That is not to say he has any antipathy towards Coulthard.’
    • ‘So Davis will begin his second term under clouds of apathy, if not antipathy.’
    • ‘And the level of antipathy towards the president's visit shocked some.’
    • ‘The Premiership clubs have never disguised their antipathy to the principle of one up, one down.’
    hostility, antagonism, animosity, aversion, animus, opposition, enmity, dislike, distaste, ill will, ill feeling, hatred, hate, abhorrence, loathing, repugnance, odium
    grudge
    allergy
    disrelish
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 16th century (in the sense opposition of feeling, nature, or disposition): from French antipathie or Latin antipathia, from Greek antipatheia, from antipathēs opposed in feeling from anti against + pathos feeling.

Pronunciation

antipathy

/anˈtēpəTHē/