Definition of antichoice in English:

antichoice

Pronunciation: /ˌantī-//ˌantēˈCHois/

adjective

North American
  • Opposed to a pregnant woman's choice of a medically induced abortion.

    Compare with pro-life
    • ‘It is also where anti-choice laws cause millions of unsafe, illegal abortions each year and where a popular repudiation of the church's stance on abortion and birth control is taking place.’
    • ‘What with talking fetuses, soft-focus lenses, and abortion as a theoretical possibility only, anti-choice propagandists could hardly do it better.’
    • ‘Perhaps an overrepresentation of marrieds and born-agains helps explain the abortion responses, which are on the anti-choice end of the current spectrum of polls.’
    • ‘While Maude's abortion was truly groundbreaking, it inadvertently galvanized the anti-choice movement.’
    • ‘The anti-choice movement shrieks that women who have abortions are murderers while the pro-choice movement shrieks that an abortion is a fundamental right of every woman and no more amoral than a haircut.’
    • ‘Besides, anti-choice activists exist to control women and their life choices.’
    • ‘Of course, the idea that meaningful choice means actively contemplating every alternative isn't unique to anti-choice critics.’
    • ‘The confrontational founder of Women on Waves is determined to bring safe abortion services to women living in anti-choice countries - any way she can.’
    • ‘At the same time that prochoice advocates fight increased abortion restrictions, the anti-choice movement celebrates victory.’
    • ‘Earlier this year the plaintiff in Roe whose change of heart has made her the darling of the anti-choice crowd, included the affidavits when she filed a petition in court to have Roe overturned.’
    • ‘For example, she argues that ‘one cannot be anti-choice and be feminist’.’
    • ‘It is men backed by anti-choice groups who pursue legal cases to stop women seeking abortions - on the basis that they will suffer as a result of the woman's decision.’
    • ‘Why not court them, he suggested, if not by naming an anti-choicer as the vice presidential candidate, then by having an anti-choice speaker at the convention?’
    • ‘Feminist Democrats supported him; he said he was anti-choice and would cut off funding for poor women's abortions - and he did.’
    • ‘‘There are many anti-choice folks, folks who think that abortion should not be legal, who have a problem with this display,’ Chambers said.’
    • ‘Since the famous Roe v Wade Supreme Court decision in 1973, which recognised women's legal right to abortion, anti-choice campaigners have fought vigorously to outlaw the procedure.’
    • ‘Doctors who perform abortions, meanwhile, bear the brunt of the organized anti-choice movement's wrath.’
    • ‘From their perspective, it makes a lot of sense to endorse an occasional blue state pro-choice Republican - certainly against an anti-choice Democrat.’
    • ‘Your story just goes to show that not having an abortion brings with it long term mental problems that anti-choice lobbyists always claim to be sole reserve of those who do have abortions.’
    • ‘The biggest difference between the anti-choice ads and the pro-choice ones is that the former came after a visible, militant anti-choice movement had emerged.’

Pronunciation:

antichoice

/ˌantī-//ˌantēˈCHois/