Definition of anti-intellectual in English:

anti-intellectual

Pronunciation: /ˌantī-//ˌantēˌintlˈekCHo͞oəl/

adjective

  • Characteristic of an anti-intellectual person.

    • ‘I wonder if some resentment the anti-intellectual crowd feels towards intellectuals is rooted in academia.’
    • ‘A second-rate novelist and a furtively fabricating social commentator, he was homophobic, anti-feminist, unsociable, anti-intellectual, authoritarian and latently violent.’
    • ‘Male culture has just become totally anti-intellectual.’
    • ‘Fakes that fool scholars have been around as long as there have been scholars, and they have always created a good amount of anti-intellectual satisfaction.’
    • ‘The anti-intellectual vulgarity does contribute to dumbing down.’
    • ‘Why do liberals always accuse those who disagree with them of being stupid and anti-intellectual.’
    • ‘I was very much taken aback by his anti-intellectual comments on the Irish language.’
    • ‘To call that message "anti-intellectual" would be a comic understatement.’
    • ‘Except in its most populist forms, conservative Christianity had rarely been as anti-intellectual as its liberal and moderate critics had claimed.’
    • ‘He had a profound anti-intellectual attitude to medical elitism.’
    • ‘I'm afraid my piece has reinforced a widespread, and in my opinion, wrongheaded anti-intellectual strain in design.’
    • ‘If anything the anti-intellectual standpoint tends towards stasis, keeping things as they are and not trying too hard to change things.’
    • ‘One realization that was particularly important for me was that faith in Christ is not anti-intellectual.’
    • ‘There is an anti-intellectual movement in the USA.’
    • ‘His novels are anti-intellectual; they strive for an almost mystical epiphany that is experienced rather than understood.’
    • ‘I always considered myself militantly anti-intellectual.’
    • ‘There's a directness, an anti-intellectual quality to my art.’
    • ‘No theologian, he was at times anti-intellectual: 'do not argue, but pray,' he advised his officers.’
    • ‘Towards the end of his life, he became increasingly paranoid, anti-intellectual, and anti-Semitic.’
    • ‘Those who object to their work find themselves castigated as anti-intellectual prudes.’

noun

  • A person who scorns intellectuals and their views and methods.

    • ‘Our profession is too frequently slandered by pundits, tinkered with by politicians, and devalued by anti-intellectuals.’
    • ‘Odd as it may seem, the education sector is filled with out-and-proud anti-intellectuals.’
    • ‘The alternative is to make intellectual life increasingly irrelevant to human affairs, to turn intellectuals into hypocrites, and to turn everyone else into anti-intellectuals.’
    • ‘It's easy for anti-intellectuals to make fun of poetry.’
    • ‘Anti-intellectuals often are distrustful of science and hostile to its practitioners.’
    • ‘Many modern directors feel obliged to pose as anti-intellectuals, adopting a facade of stupidity they are unable to carry off with any conviction.’
    • ‘Though we tease a bit, please don't mistake us for anti-intellectuals!’
    • ‘Maybe I'm an anti-intellectual or just plain stupid.’
    • ‘Indeed, the term "ivory tower" is generally used by anti-intellectuals to denigrate and marginalize the achievements of the academic world.’
    • ‘I think I might be an anti-intellectual.’
    • ‘The festival will have something to tickle the interest of all but the staunchest anti-intellectuals.’
    lowbrow, anti-intellectual, materialist, bourgeois
    View synonyms

Pronunciation:

anti-intellectual

/ˌantī-//ˌantēˌintlˈekCHo͞oəl/