Definition of Anglo-American in US English:

Anglo-American

adjective

  • 1Relating to both Britain and the US.

    ‘Anglo-American folk music’
    ‘the first Anglo-American agreement on the future of air transport’
    • ‘The recently released JIC minutes for 6 June 1941 reveal the precise structure of Anglo-American intelligence cooperation in the Far East.’
    • ‘‘Then,’ he said, ‘in 1945 an Anglo-American committee studied everything’ to decide what should become of the country.’
    • ‘Also, the genre has become so immured in an Anglo-American nostalgia for a European past that it's refreshing to find a non-Eurocentric example of an alternate-world fantasy novel.’
    • ‘The point is that this Anglo-American tradition of limited, representative government developed over hundreds of years.’
    • ‘Doing so also involved them in a broader shifting of Puritanism's reputation in an Anglo-American context, spurred on by Cromwell's rehabilitation, first by evangelicals and, later, by imperialists.’
    • ‘What is unusual is that this is something of an Anglo-American undertaking and an acknowledgement of the continuing ties between the Mother Country and her most powerful offspring.’
    • ‘In March 1886, Millet and Abbey took a seven-year lease on the more commodious Russell House, and not long afterward Broadway became an Anglo-American art colony.’
    • ‘Moving from musings about bathrooms to concentration camps, this Anglo-American collection succeeds to a satisfying degree in capturing a 100-year heaven-and - hell.’
    • ‘Where Menninghaus writes in relation to a European philosophical tradition, Altieri is very much in conversation with an Anglo-American tradition that has largely theorized affect along cognitive lines.’
    • ‘It also assumes that an Anglo-American type trial is the best (if not the only) means of establishing the ‘real’ truth.’
    • ‘The Centennial Exhibition was the foremost catalyst of this Anglo-American dialogue, and Dresser, Godwin, Morris, and Talbert were all represented at the exhibition.’
    • ‘Domicile is mostly an Anglo-American concept although the definition differs slightly between the two jurisdictions.’
    • ‘To Burger, the tradition of access was no historical accident, but was ‘an indispensable attribute of an Anglo-American trial.’’
    • ‘Brazil, like every other nation on this planet, including Japan, is the victim of an Anglo-American dictate to try to perpetuate that bankrupt system.’
    • ‘While whites have demanded that nonwhites assimilate to an Anglo-American way of life, the possibility that whites should assimilate to nonwhite culture seems downright un-American.’
    • ‘The British seem more comfortable with the concept of an Anglo-American alliance than they do with the idea of a federal Europe.’
    • ‘German opposition convinced the Russians that limitation should not appear on the 1907 program; an Anglo-American resolution recognizing the seriousness of the arms race was only a gesture.’
    • ‘The decisive engagement occurred in 1759 when an Anglo-American force of nine thousand men under General James Wolfe attacked Quebec, New France.’
    • ‘I'd been worried about how I, an Arabic Christian from Galilee, would fit into an Anglo-American Lutheran context and how I could maintain and express my identity.’
    • ‘In modern times, this Anglo-American vision of an idealistic foreign policy is most closely associated with President Woodrow Wilson.’
    1. 1.1 Of English descent, but born or living in the US.
      ‘an Anglo-American architect and historian’
      • ‘I, the child of an African-American mother from the South Side of Chicago and an Anglo-American father from the San Fernando Valley in Los Angeles, had searched my whole life for a better understanding of such terms.’
      • ‘Ha'aretz has an interesting article about an Anglo-American proponent of cultural Judaism and Jewish studies.’
      • ‘Born in Oaxaca to an Anglo-American father and a Mixtec Indian mother, Downs grew up living in Tlaxiaco, Oaxaca and Minneapolis, Minnesota as well as in Southern California.’
      • ‘How serious are this Anglo-American couple about creating their own post-blues niche?’
      • ‘This essay compares two poetic collections, one by a contemporary woman from the North of Ireland and one by an Anglo-American modernist, to show their contrasting approaches to womanhood and lyric poetry.’
      • ‘Over the past four years, there hasn't been much evidence of any Anglo-American babies being born.’
      • ‘Origo was an Anglo-American woman raised outside Florence and married to a prominent Italian landowner.’
      • ‘But it is run by Howard Hulford, an Anglo-American, on a whim of iron you ought to know about.’

noun

  • 1An American born in England or of English ancestry.

    ‘I'm an Anglo-American who moved to the US in early adulthood’
    • ‘Despite grousing from some Anglo-Americans who felt their claims had been ignored (and who mounted occasional filibustering expeditions), the border held.’
    1. 1.1 An American whose native tongue is English.
      ‘Anglo-Americans who do not speak Spanish’

Pronunciation

Anglo-American

/æŋɡloʊəˈmɛrəkən//aNGɡlōəˈmerəkən/