Definition of analytic in English:

analytic

adjective

  • 1

    another term for analytical
    • ‘To address these analytic questions, arithmetic means, medians, and modes were computed for each rated question to determine relationships and effects.’
    • ‘Donald Worster, on the other hand, provides an analytic reinterpretation of explorer John Wesley Powell as a neglected visionary.’
    • ‘The analytic tendency investigates works from the past in order to find possibilities that often exceed those their authors had anticipated.’
    • ‘Many search-engine sites offer free analytic tools of their own.’
    • ‘These include cluster analytic investigations carried out in Florida, The Netherlands, and Finland.’
    • ‘Smith's interest in analytic anthropology, however, melded with his ingrained faith in metaphysics.’
    • ‘Future analytic events will further investigate other issues and conceivably merit additional changes to the IBCT design.’
    • ‘One benefit from these groups is the opportunity to formulate, through talk, one's research questions and analytic strategies.’
    • ‘The prospect of a second war on Iraq raises a large number of questions, analytic and political.’
    • ‘Participants provided information about their specimen collection, processing, and analytic practices in a questionnaire.’
    • ‘To examine and simplify interpretation of correlational matrices, investigators commonly use factor analytic procedures.’
    • ‘Through this analytic process the investigators were able to obtain a rich account of each event category and how each contributed to the respondents' perception of clinical confidence.’
    • ‘As an example of the former, Wiseman applies his wonderfully analytic mind to question specific prior efforts to criticize the conclusions of the Feilding Report.’
    • ‘And on some crucial questions Allen suffers from analytic myopia.’
    • ‘However, mathematicians began to demand more rigour with the growing interest in analytic investigation.’
    • ‘Newbigin looked at the West with a missionary's eye and asked a missionary's analytic questions.’
    • ‘In a sense it therefore freezes the ‘I’ of analytic investigation.’
    • ‘Participant responses to questions regarding their analytic and reporting practices are shown in Table 2.’
    • ‘A dimensionless form of the analytic model permits exploration of the parameters that control rolling.’
    • ‘An exploratory data analytic approach was adopted with 14-17 independent variables selected for each analysis.’
    1. 1.1Logic True by virtue of the meaning of the words or concepts used to express it, so that its denial would be a self-contradiction.
      Compare with synthetic
      • ‘The meaning of theoretical terms is not defined by analytic statements which are true by convention.’
      • ‘This, however, is incorrect: it depends on the assumption that the truths of logic are analytic, which Quine rejects.’
      • ‘For example, all bachelors are unmarried is analytic if the concept of being unmarried is contained in the concept of bachelor.’
      • ‘It is supposedly a hallmark of analytic truths that their denials are self-contradictory.’
      • ‘Contemporary philosophers recognize the possibility that sentences that express identities might be synthetic as opposed to analytic or true by definition.’
      detached, impersonal, dispassionate, objective, uninvolved, distant, remote, aloof, removed, cold, indifferent, neutral, unsympathetic, unfeeling, unemotional, non-emotional, unsentimental
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2Linguistics (of a language) tending not to alter the form of its words and to use word order rather than inflection or agglutination to express grammatical structure.
      Often contrasted with synthetic
      • ‘So, the elaboration and use of the relatively more restricted lexical vocabulary consisting more of root words than derived ones (and more compounds than affixed words among derived ones) is only natural for analytic language speakers.’
      • ‘Donnellan's reason for thinking it indeterminate is that our present use of such an analytic sentence, while correct now, should not be expected to hold for all hypothetical cases.’
      • ‘A later view, endorsed by Otto Jespersen, held that a fairly analytic language such as English represented the best and most evolved type of structure.’
      orderly, well ordered, well organized, well thought out, planned, well planned, efficient, businesslike, coherent, systematic, scientific, structured, logical, analytic, formal, regular, well regulated, disciplined
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Origin

Early 17th century: via Latin from Greek analutikos, from analuein unloose The term was adopted in the late 16th century as a noun denoting the branch of logic dealing with analysis, with specific reference to Aristotle's treatises on logic, the Analytics ( Greek analutika).

Pronunciation:

analytic

/ˌanəˈlidik/