Definition of analeptic in English:

analeptic

adjective

Medicine
  • (chiefly of a drug) tending to restore a person's health or strength; restorative.

    • ‘Gillian's inability to relate her mental life to her body is strengthened by a proleptic vision of her ageing body within an analeptic description of her youthful body.’
    • ‘Others view meperidine as inappropriate because the metabolite if meperidine, normeperidine, causes analeptic activity (ie, central nervous system stimulation).’
    • ‘This analeptic effect of MAP was blocked by atropine but not by atropine methylbromide, indicating the central cholinergic nature of the response.’
    • ‘The general analeptic properties of PHYS have been explored in postanesthesia patients who underwent surgery.’
    • ‘His voice had gone soft, analeptic even, in an effort to make me release the iron-like grip I held.’
    healing, curative, curing, remedial, medicinal, restorative, health-giving, tonic, sanative, reparative, corrective, ameliorative, beneficial, good, salubrious, salutary
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noun

Medicine
  • 1A restorative drug.

    • ‘Administration of said polypeptides will be preferably carried out by the intravenous route in the shock conditions and by nasal inhalation when the polypeptides are used as analeptics.’
    • ‘Easily digestible, they fill the stomachs of those who can afford little else, and they fall into the ranks of those restorative foods called analeptics.’
    • ‘These are more properly described as analeptics (meaning restorative); nikethamide is an example.’
    tonic, restorative, energizer, stimulant, antidepressant, refresher
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    1. 1.1 A drug that stimulates the central nervous system.
      • ‘Herbs that open the obstructed heart orifice and restore consciousness are known as herbs for promoting resuscitation, or analeptics [agents that strongly stimulate the central nervous system].’
      • ‘Many mental health counselors point out that the proliferation of analeptics on college campuses is partly a matter of demographics.’
      • ‘The respiratory rate, tidal volume and minute ventilation were measured in 18 patients with pulmonary emphysema and chronic respiratory failure prior to and following the administration of three different analeptics.’

Origin

Late 16th century: via late Latin from Greek analēptikos restorative.

Pronunciation:

analeptic

/ˌanəˈleptik/