Definition of amphiboly in English:

amphiboly

noun

  • another term for amphibology
    • ‘So much so, that there will be no equivocations or amphibolies, and everything which will be said intelligibly in that language will be said with propriety.’
    • ‘We are taken through a labyrinth of puns, amphibolies, alliterations, symmetries, inversions, analogies, and in a variety of tones.’
    • ‘He has committed the amphiboly of confusing concepts, conceptual objects and the relationships we find among such objects with objects of the senses and the relations we find there.’
    • ‘Linguistically, an amphiboly is an ambiguity which results from ambiguous grammar, as opposed to one that results from the ambiguity of words or phrases - that is, Equivocation.’
    • ‘The fallacy of amphiboly results because of poor sentence construction.’
    • ‘Street signs can suffer from a case of amphiboly because they tend not to use punctuation.’
    • ‘This book examines apposition as well as poetic compounds, amphibolies, and certain other narrative devices as keys to style and structure of Beowulf.’
    • ‘Perhaps, if we are to maintain the doctrine of agency as a possession of the agent, it is more productive to let the amphiboly lie as it is.’
    • ‘Some amphibolies were also presented, although less frequently than the pyroxenes.’
    • ‘An amphiboly occurs when the construction of a sentence allows it to have two different meanings.’
    • ‘Some of the goals of a non-epistemology are as follows: to free up the use of epistemological discourses; to refuse to submit them to the directions for use imposed by the putative synthesis of its objects; to transform the amphibolies of epistemology into particular objects without merely overturning oppositions.’
    • ‘Examples such as the following depend upon amphiboly: ‘I wish that you the enemy may capture’.’

Pronunciation:

amphiboly

/amˈfibəlē/