Definition of alliance in English:

alliance

noun

  • 1A union or association formed for mutual benefit, especially between countries or organizations.

    ‘a defensive alliance between Australia and New Zealand’
    ‘divisions within the alliance’
    • ‘Some of his accomplishments there included meeting and building alliances with other producer organizations.’
    • ‘Howard said Australia had to accept the responsibilities as well as the benefits of its alliance with the U.S.’
    • ‘The alliance threatened yesterday to organize 10,000 people to demonstrate if their petition is not dealt with.’
    • ‘We are creating an alliance between the union, service users and local communities in support of a publicly owned Royal Mail.’
    • ‘In 1939, therefore, the British and French embarked on an attempt to build an alliance with the Soviet Union.’
    • ‘Such an organisational alliance with the populist right would be unthinkable for progressive French and Dutch campaigners.’
    • ‘A major and rather obvious benefit to forming these alliances is the ability to pool resources.’
    • ‘The government, furthermore, favoured cooperation with the labour unions and forged strong alliances with them.’
    • ‘Organize a gay-straight alliance or student group if there isn't one already.’
    • ‘Several blocs within the alliance are vying for top government positions.’
    • ‘The council and the chamber should further seek alliances with such organisations as the tourism association for new ideas.’
    • ‘Both the bank and the entrepreneurial company benefit from these Internet alliances, Cairns says.’
    • ‘Indeed, some of the founding organisations have left the alliance and struck out once again into glorious, and useless, isolation.’
    • ‘In these instances members of trade unions in the alliance should also be encouraged to work together to eradicate bad practices.’
    • ‘Old alliances with organized labor and with other minority groups must be resuscitated.’
    • ‘There is a new openness by unions today to building alliances with community-based organizations and churches.’
    • ‘All of this activity will benefit the Australia-U.S. alliance across the board.’
    • ‘They would also benefit from alliances with community groups and other unions in putting pressure on their employer.’
    • ‘The organisation wants to forge alliances with different groups to raise awareness about animal rights.’
    • ‘We also have a mandate to lobby government, and we seek to build a broad alliance of individuals and organizations that share common goals.’
    association, union, league, treaty, pact, compact, entente, concordat
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    1. 1.1 A relationship based on an affinity in interests, nature, or qualities.
      ‘an alliance between medicine and morality’
      • ‘Then it wouldn't be in the best interest of our alliance for you to have me bound at your feet, would it?’
      • ‘Here, his political background is left out, as is the nature of his criminal alliance with Tom.’
      • ‘Instead, Lovejoy recommends that practitioners develop alliances and become relationship managers.’
      • ‘Your album title Songs in the Key of the Devil suggests an unholy alliance with darker forces heretofore unseen.’
      • ‘Monica says she's looking forward to expanding her public and private client base through her alliance with Noctor.’
      relationship, affinity, association, connection, closeness, kinship, propinquity
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    2. 1.2 The state of being joined or associated.
      ‘his party is in alliance with the Greens’
      • ‘Sharp will continue to develop and sell flash memory chips in alliance with Intel Corp.’
      • ‘Campaign to Stop Killer Coke, in alliance with students, also showed up to debate them.’
      • ‘Because the socialists refused to take part in government, they forced the Radicals to rule alone or in alliance with the right.’
      • ‘The network operates nationally and internationally, in alliance with sympathetic professionals.’
      • ‘Into this sea of troubles the British, in alliance with the French, were to launch a second war on China in 1857.’
      • ‘The government was striving, in alliance with big business, to increase British competitiveness.’
      • ‘All the planets want us in alliance with them but we're trying to stay neutral.’
      • ‘We like to make sure that we are in alliance with what moms want for their children, says de Saint Perier.’
      • ‘Clinton acted in alliance with NATO partners and the United Nations.’
      • ‘He had urged Charles to dissolve Parliament and continue the third Dutch War in alliance with France.’
      • ‘Australia is a status quo country in alliance with the greatest revisionist country in the world.’
      • ‘Israel is powerful and in alliance with the only superpower.’
      • ‘For all the US's military and economic advantages, its power is enhanced when it acts in alliance with other countries.’
      • ‘Yet I also know he would rather be paired with any of them or even a guy instead of being temporarily in alliance with me.’
      • ‘They are in alliance with the British section of the fundamentalist Muslim Brotherhood.’
      • ‘We work in alliance with manufacturers of these items so that any of our customers need only deal with one supplier.’
      • ‘Clive points me to the old Muslim Association of Britain website, dating from the days before it was in alliance with the Socialist Workers Party.’
      • ‘The Conservatives currently run the city in alliance with the Liberal Democrats but with Labour as the largest single party.’
      • ‘In alliance with Rock Against Racism it was able to put on not just two huge carnivals, but countless events that drew black and white young people together.’
      • ‘Apparently the UK went to war in alliance with the US ‘to make our country safer’.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French aliance, from alier ‘to ally’ (see ally).

Pronunciation

alliance

/əˈlīəns//əˈlaɪəns/