Definition of allegretto in English:

allegretto

adverb & adjective

Music
  • (especially as a direction) at a fairly brisk tempo.

    • ‘It's more allegretto than andante, like a Brahms symphonic intermezzo.’
    • ‘The buoyancy of the first movement was slightly exaggerated by all three musicians: the allegretto indication does, after all, bear the qualification poco.’
    • ‘Nevertheless, it does match the reduced forces of the chamber score and settles into a nice fit in the allegretto movements.’
    • ‘Marked allegretto scherzando, in the key of A minor, this piece has a lively, playful spirit.’
    • ‘‘Yes,’ he had in a pause regained his allegretto humour.’

noun

Music
  • A movement or piece to be played fairly briskly.

    • ‘The conductor's subtly, phrased, light treatment of the first movement and the long unbroken lyrical line of the Andante quasi allegretto really made the music glow anew!’
    • ‘There are more sensuous pauses and pensive gulfs between his allegrettos and adagios.’
    • ‘Following the intermission there was hardly pause enough to take one's seat: Gergiev lunged forward into the allegretto, his hands caressing the strings as if consoling an infant.’
    • ‘Schiff was not afraid to make a wistful gesture in the adagio with a slight bending back of his head, nor to smile during the most tender phrases of the allegretto.’
    • ‘A slow, caressing opening statement leads to a jaunty allegretto and then to a rondo with a distinct gypsy flavor.’

Origin

Italian, diminutive of allegro.

Pronunciation

allegretto

/ˌæləˈɡrɛdoʊ//ˌaləˈɡredō/