Definition of all in English:

all

determiner, predeterminer, & pronoun

  • 1Used to refer to the whole quantity or extent of a particular group or thing.

    as predeterminer ‘all the people I met’
    ‘she left all her money to him’
    as determiner ‘10% of all cars sold’
    ‘he slept all day’
    ‘carry all of the blame’
    as pronoun ‘four bedrooms, all with balconies’
    ‘the men are all bearded’
    • ‘All of these are claimed to be forgeries by some historians but some, or all, may well be genuine.’
    • ‘All of us are sons and daughters of Adam and this means that we are all brothers and sisters.’
    • ‘If you play all of them immediately, it is likely that you'll win all three of them as tricks.’
    • ‘The term is often used to refer to all Roman territories during both the republic and the empire.’
    • ‘All of them, all fifteen boys, were yelling and hollering as Coach Dodson seemed to be in shock.’
    • ‘Though all art is a form of healing and therapy to some extent, all therapy is not art.’
    • ‘People bandy around the word tactics when in fact they are referring to all sorts of other aspects of the game.’
    • ‘Pupils on foot and those arriving by car are all using the same main gate.’
    • ‘The individual always acts as a whole, which includes all mental and physical processes.’
    • ‘Moffatt and Dougan tackled courageously all afternoon and the whole team never gave up.’
    • ‘They all use a small quantity of caramel to smooth out colour variations from cask to cask.’
    • ‘But when your big car gets hit by an even bigger car, it all becomes rather academic.’
    • ‘Taken as a whole, all musics of a nation may provide sufficient room for each music.’
    • ‘I felt that I had been a victim all of my life. I have had all sorts of bad things happen to me.’
    • ‘However, to a certain extent all university students are indulging in escapism to a degree.’
    • ‘Also to all of you dedicated people who have supported June all year a big thank you.’
    • ‘All of these can all be found in the granite-gneiss basement of the central Black Forest.’
    • ‘Amy and Phil still failed to settle their differences but all of that sort of became lost in the energy of it all.’
    • ‘I wipe it against the other finger tips and suddenly all of them are all white paint.’
    • ‘She told the inquest she saw all four of the car's wheels leave the road as it went over the bridge.’
    each of, each one of the, every one of the, every single one of the
    the whole of the, every bit of the, the complete, the entire, the totality of the
    complete, entire, total, full, utter, perfect, all-out, greatest, greatest possible, maximum
    everyone, everybody, each person, every person, the lot, the whole lot
    each one, each thing, the sum, the total, the whole lot
    everything, every part, the whole amount, the total amount, the lot, the whole lot, the entirety, the sum total, the aggregate
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1determiner Any whatever.
      ‘he denied all knowledge’
      ‘assured beyond all doubt’
      • ‘After all, it's better to keep your mouth shut and be thought a fool than to open it and remove all doubt.’
      • ‘Except that both drivers who plied the route denied all knowledge of the transaction.’
      • ‘It is a clever piece of ensemble filmmaking that succeeds beyond all reasonable hope.’
      • ‘One can be hounded for scandal one day and made noble beyond all conception the next.’
      • ‘Extreme versions of the view have it that all knowledge is, or ideally ought to be, based on reason.’
      • ‘He was beyond all hope, rolling around on the floor with tears in his eyes.’
      • ‘The boxer denied all knowledge of the gun, ammunition and drugs and told police he had been set up.’
      • ‘He denied all knowledge of the attack saying he would have been at home at the time.’
      • ‘A boy can, and all too often does, walk away denying all knowledge of the situation.’
      • ‘There is a danger that we are seeking to right past wrongs in a world which has changed beyond all recognition.’
      • ‘And then it finally sank in that he was beyond all hope, and that she was powerless to stop him.’
      • ‘Third, for Hegel State does not mean simply the government but refers to all social life.’
      • ‘Thus in the same place he says that God exists beyond all substance and life.’
      • ‘The practical demands of wartime changed social customs beyond all recognition.’
      • ‘In the library of the mind, all knowledge on any topic came up by simply reflecting on it.’
      • ‘No, it is because equipment and techniques have changed beyond all recognition.’
      • ‘He had denied all knowledge of this appointment a few minutes before.’
      • ‘The persecution of Jews during the same period is established beyond all doubt.’
      • ‘Apart from an engraving of the period all knowledge of the former structure was then lost.’
      • ‘That that was the joint intention of both these parties appears to me to be beyond all doubt.’
    2. 1.2determiner Used to emphasize the greatest possible amount of a quality.
      ‘they were in all probability completely unaware’
      ‘with all due respect’
      • ‘With all due respect, this group of lightweights has no chance of winning the election.’
      • ‘The fact that they were under the charge of the nurse effectually did away with all possibility of fraud.’
      • ‘In all fairness she is saving the children from a life of poverty and misery.’
      • ‘In all seriousness, this crusty old Volvo has been in more movies than Michael Caine.’
      • ‘With all respect, if we look from one perspective, it is just like looking at ants.’
      • ‘In all likelihood, most of those apprehended had no idea they were breaking the law.’
      • ‘With all possible respect to the authors of this proposal, I do not find it very clear.’
      • ‘There was one in her size in Bond Street and it would make its way north with all due haste.’
      • ‘In all honesty, until a few weeks ago he had no idea how to pronounce the word.’
      • ‘In all honesty, players who practise as much as these ones should be doing much better.’
      • ‘In all honesty, they were again seeing it as our input sabotaging what they wanted to do.’
      • ‘With all respect to her argument I do not think that is quite the correct way of putting it.’
      • ‘With all due respect, I think that it is time for your writer to ask of herself why she does it.’
      • ‘With all due respect to Mr Hiddink, it is unlikely he would have achieved what O'Neill has.’
      • ‘In all probability she would have been dumped after two or three books which didn't sell very well.’
      • ‘We are making sure they are doing everything in their power to sort things out with all due speed.’
      • ‘With all due respect to Chen, he needs to be set straight on that right from the start.’
      • ‘In all seriousness, though, a large proportion of them are either taken or dead.’
      • ‘So, with all due respect, let's see what the outcome is before passing judgement.’
      • ‘In all honesty I was expecting a tiny wall stuck in the corner of the hall about eight feet high.’
    3. 1.3informal Dominated by a particular feature or characteristic.
      ‘an eleven-year-old string bean, all elbows and knees’
      • ‘He can't be all bad then.’
      • ‘After a long period of not speaking, my ex is being all normal and friendly towards me.’
      • ‘In between those two scares the story was all Wanderers dominance and atrocious weather.’
      • ‘The rest of this is going to be all business, and it most likely won't take long so if you want to go wait outside, that's fine.’
    4. 1.4pronoun , with clause The only thing (used for emphasis)
      ‘all I want is to be left alone’
      • ‘Make any change to the reference period, change the baseline, and all that happens is you create equivalent offsets to the beginning and ending anomaly.’
      • ‘All that is left to say is that I hope those of you who attended thought the event as worthwhile and inspirational as I did.’
      • ‘How much must this cost in time and paperwork, surely all that is required is a police presence?’
      • ‘All that is left to do is to secure the gemstone in the setting.’
      • ‘I realize it’s a little obscure, but it amused me and that’s all that counts.’
      • ‘Everyone knows that all I wanted was to be off that list.’
    5. 1.5pronoun (used to refer to surroundings or a situation in general) everything.
      ‘all was well’
      ‘it was all very strange’
      • ‘On the surface, all is well.’
      • ‘Although the team took a significant step towards the quarter-finals, the manager will know better than to think all was perfect in Galicia last night.’
      • ‘It all seems a bit strange, especially having only just taken the job at Molineux.’
      • ‘Her father was troubled by a nagging doubt that all was not as it appeared.’
      • ‘Where is the Government in all of this, do they think all is right with the world, do they?’
      each one, each thing, the sum, the total, the whole lot
      View synonyms
    6. 1.6US dialect Consumed; finished; gone.
      ‘the cake is all’

adverb

  • 1Used for emphasis.

    1. 1.1 Completely.
      ‘dressed all in black’
      ‘she's been all around the world’
      ‘all by himself’
      • ‘And there was me thinking that we have the perfectionism game sewn up all by ourselves.’
      • ‘She heard some steps coming down the stairs and out of it came Jason, all dressed up and ready for work.’
      • ‘We are all dressed up and ready to go, prepared to jump in as soon as the current drops to a diveable speed.’
      • ‘Two birdies at the start of his final round were all well and good, but now it had become three.’
      • ‘You have to get into their last third of the pitch as often as you can and then it is all about the quality of the chance you create.’
      • ‘Miss Pain tried to look cheerful but they looked all dressed up with nowhere to go.’
      • ‘He pulled out three black robes, all of the same size as the person wearing it.’
      • ‘Tranquillity is one of the central qualities which define what the national park is all about.’
      • ‘Bizarre belts Last year it was all about studded leather belts around rock chic waists.’
      • ‘From then on, the game was all about the forward confrontation and the boots of Lynagh and Andrew.’
      • ‘The prototype car is all different and I never even gave it a thought that this was the Nextel Cup garage.’
      • ‘A woman was at home, all dressed in white, she had her little white pet mouse with her.’
      • ‘He told me all about your lovely black curls and blue eyes, speaking of you as though you were an angel.’
      • ‘He was all dressed up, wearing a suit and a kaffiyeh, he looked really respectable.’
      • ‘Those monks have had their own way for far too long and this is all about equal opportunities.’
      • ‘But it was scary in court anyway, with everyone all dressed up just like the real thing.’
      completely, fully, entirely, totally, wholly, absolutely, utterly, outright, thoroughly, altogether, quite, in every respect, in all respects, without reservation, without exception
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 Consisting entirely of.
      ‘all leather varsity jacket’
      • ‘This all leather water resistant golf shoe is fitted with soft spikes for better tread.’
      • ‘If you want to avoid formaldehyde altogether, you will need to switch to an all cotton wardrobe.’
  • 2(in games) used after a number to indicate an equal score.

    ‘after extra time it was still two all’
    • ‘This was a game that went basket for basket with the game level at 14 all for some time.’
    • ‘The junior was on top in the early part of the game only to relax and see her older opponent come back into the game to take the match to two all.’
    • ‘Byes will be recorded as 1-all draws and the team will receive 1 pt.’
    • ‘Gough called set three but at 15 all, two errors handed the game to Palmer.’
    • ‘In the 50th minute Conway dropped a great goal from 35 metres leaving the scores at 3 all.’

noun

  • The whole of one's energy or interest.

    ‘giving their all for what they believed’
    • ‘Ja gave each song his all.’
    • ‘‘Because of that, he gave us his all,’ said Ken Detwiler, his manager. ‘We couldn't have asked more from an employee ’.’
    • ‘A local Marine gave his all fighting for a cause he believed was just.’
    • ‘Wallschlaeger gave his all for Gowanda.’
    • ‘Burman gave his all to his job.’
    • ‘But nobody will ever be able to accuse the man from Keith of not giving his all for country and cause.’

Phrases

  • all comers

    • informal Anyone who chooses to take part in an activity, typically a competition.

      ‘the champion took on all comers’
      • ‘Apparently it's a fast course and he's trying to beat the British all comers record.’
      • ‘The Arksorn School has won the competition for the fifth straight year defeating all comers in the competition.’
      • ‘Open to all comers, it attracts thousands of Norwegians, and most of the world's best marathon skiers.’
      • ‘From there the two talking heads plotted and pasted together the concept of an international race, which would attract all comers.’
      • ‘Tea and refreshments will be served and a great welcome awaits all comers at this special event organised by the local committee.’
      • ‘Far from expecting privacy on a website, its designers hope for the greatest possible exposure to all comers.’
      • ‘In the event, the candidate brushed aside all comers as in 1938.’
      • ‘While the poor run of results is causing some to pull their hair out, the young internationalist is regularly turning in good performances against all comers.’
      • ‘Brian beat all comers in the competition as fishers from all over Ulster came to Silverbridge to try and catch a big one.’
      • ‘One spot is an open competition between Joe Odom and all comers.’
      • ‘But the car all comers have to beat is this one, and it's stiff competition.’
      • ‘The other key point that is beginning to distinguish the company's range is on-the-road ability, where the cars are now routinely trouncing all comers.’
      • ‘It has considerable interests in that country, which it intends to defend against all comers.’
      • ‘A grey heron meditates halfway up a tree, while a pair of red-wattled lapwings drive away all comers from their private niche.’
      • ‘Mr Dymond said it was hoped to have displays by professional skaters and bikers with open competitions for all comers to take part in.’
      • ‘He started with style - speaking plainly and wandering around in a bus addressing town meetings open to all comers.’
      • ‘We do not need to be available 24 hours to all comers.’
      • ‘One reason is that it throws open to all comers, both client and provider, the ‘knowledge economy’.’
      • ‘Last week, they offered the info to all comers, ending their exclusive agreement.’
      • ‘Here we are finally at Easter, with our Easter Carnival all ready, the course looking good and ready to take on all comers.’
  • all for

    • informal Strongly in favor of.

      ‘I was all for tolerance’
      • ‘They are all for the odd shock, but not every other week.’
      • ‘I am all for recycling, but I don't see how we will gain anything from such a poorly managed scheme.’
      • ‘I am all for protecting species because they are useful, or aesthetically pleasing.’
      • ‘After speaking a bit, I asked him if he'd be down for an interview, and he was all for it.’
      • ‘I'm all for seniors tackling technology with a song in their heart but your kitchen is your kitchen.’
      • ‘One councillor was all for breaking off negotiations with the association.’
      • ‘I was all for using my paddle as a club and bashing the living daylights out of it if it got any closer.’
      • ‘That is to say 95 per cent of the public who use taxis would be all for an additional test.’
      • ‘In general, I'm all for investment trusts when they are trading on large discounts.’
      • ‘I'm all for experiment and economy, but a less ambitious reading might be more coherent.’
      • ‘I'm all for movies being made on digital video and released in cinemas.’
      in favour of, pro, for, giving support to, giving backing to, right behind, encouraging of, approving of, sympathetic to
      View synonyms
  • all in

    • informal Exhausted.

      ‘he was all in by halftime’
      tired out, worn out, weary, dog-tired, bone-tired, bone-weary, ready to drop, on one's last legs, asleep on one's feet, drained, fatigued, enervated, debilitated, spent
      View synonyms
  • all in all

    • Everything considered; on the whole.

      ‘all in all it's been a good year’
      • ‘There was no point in justifying her actions because all in all, it embarrassed HIM!’
      • ‘So all in all, apart from the obvious need to drive, I think it's something I really want to do.’
      • ‘But all in all, I was pretty confident coming back in here this morning.’
      • ‘So all in all, they are asking you to close your eyes and believe.’
      • ‘So all in all, it was a very nice evening and I thank everyone who voted me the thing but couldn't be present.’
      • ‘So, all in all, I would still say the economy is a major issue for American voters at this point.’
      • ‘This was the first outing and all in all, a very successful learning experience.’
      • ‘It was hard at times, like when money was tight, but all in all, he was great.’
      • ‘Although the site may have been different, all in all, the annual celebration of this culture was a success.’
      • ‘So, all in all, I have begun looking for shows I think come from this sort of thinking.’
      • ‘It is, all in all, quite a spectacular living space, and there is a strange feeling of deja vu.’
      • ‘It took barely five minutes to respond to my call following a heart attack, and all in all no less than four medics were in attendance.’
      • ‘But all in all, Brown has good reason to envy the performance of the American economy.’
      • ‘So, all in all, it baffles me that more British anglers don't hunt out asp specifically when they're travelling abroad.’
      • ‘They wreak havoc on our nervous systems and, all in all, make for generally unsavoury experiences.’
      • ‘The bar is set very high for animations now and all in all, this is just a distinctly average film.’
      • ‘I think we both recognised that what we had done was, all in all, a low-down thing.’
      • ‘It's an extremely odd little movie, all in all, and it's a little tough to understand the high expectations.’
      • ‘Taken all in all, this is probably the biggest humanitarian relief operation in history.’
      • ‘But all in all, I would much rather have been running on the straight.’
      all things considered, considering everything, on the whole, taking everything into account, taking everything into consideration, at the end of the day, when all's said and done
      View synonyms
  • all kinds (or sorts) of

    • Many different kinds of.

      ‘how to install paneling on all kinds of walls’
      • ‘Avoid all kinds of secret activity as you are likely to fall into trouble this week.’
      • ‘The foot is incredibly complex and all kinds of forces and loads pass through different parts.’
      • ‘The problem that the analysts have is that they have to please all sorts of different people.’
      • ‘The gain is that all kinds of minorities with different views are now represented.’
      • ‘Stories from all kinds of different cultures have common threads running through them.’
      • ‘When you get used to all sorts of different bits of kit attached to your body they lose their mystique.’
      • ‘If you start chasing this team on a good night for them, you can end up in all sorts of trouble.’
      • ‘I worked at Stockport for five years in all and worked on all sorts of different engines.’
      • ‘In our group there are people from all sorts of different political backgrounds.’
      • ‘It is possible to think of all sorts of offbeat things or things that would sound trite.’
      • ‘It also means I can test out a different commenting system and try all kinds of fancy things.’
      • ‘You could put all sorts of different genes in animals and do all sorts of damage.’
      • ‘There are all sorts of other cases in which the standard components of parenting can come apart.’
      • ‘If we had kept them we could have had towns laid out like our fields in all sorts of different shapes.’
      • ‘The internet is also a means for people to get music from all sorts of different sources.’
      • ‘The carmaker has filled its body with all kinds of cunningly developed foams and insulators.’
      • ‘We'll start having all sorts of trouble with you if you start thinking you're funny.’
      • ‘So I did all sorts of crazy stuff and got myself into trouble on a regular basis.’
      • ‘It was only then that I noticed all sorts of little details which had evaded my notice earlier.’
      • ‘Bradford needs to develop a different, more positive image on all sorts of fronts.’
  • all of

    • As much as (typically used ironically of a quantity considered small by the speaker)

      ‘the show lasted all of six weeks’
      • ‘That final plan lasted all of about six months.’
      • ‘That mood, however, lasted all of five minutes.’
      • ‘This moment of Zen lasted all of 30 seconds.’
      • ‘Criminally this lasts all of about ninety seconds as if he wasn't supposed to be in the film at all but just happened to busking there when the director wandered by with his camera.’
      • ‘This generated an amazing meeting that lasted all of thirty seconds, in which Brian declared ‘we’re keeping Studio X’.’
  • all out

    • Using all one's strength or resources.

      ‘going all out to win’
      as adjective ‘an all-out effort’
      • ‘After a goalless first half, Ware went all out after the break to stifle Dorking's creativity.’
      • ‘We'll be going all out for victory, which would do wonders for the game in this part of the country.’
      • ‘With the win vital to Rossendale, they went on all out attack to try for the much needed goal and the three points.’
      • ‘The newcomers will be going all out to claim the team championship in a special six-a-side event.’
      • ‘The speaker from east London, where they went all out and won, got a great reception.’
      • ‘The Galway side know only too well the task that lies ahead of them and they will be all out to upset the odds.’
      • ‘Ministers will be putting their differences behind them and going all out for victory.’
      • ‘It is not like the Champions League format where you can go all out to win the game.’
      • ‘Activists are now going all out to win the ballot for action over the next few weeks.’
      • ‘Perhaps just as importantly, another company is also going all out to win the contract.’
      • ‘In other words, when the Prime Minister is confident of victory he goes all out to ensure he wins.’
      • ‘If draws are removed, we will see better matches with teams playing all out attacking football.’
      • ‘The team will be all out to retain the title but they will know that champions can be beaten.’
      • ‘The racecourse's new owners are going all out make their first meeting a memorable one.’
      • ‘These two players both went close as College went all out for an equaliser.’
      • ‘Those involved are fully aware that they may not succeed in stopping an all out war.’
      • ‘We will be going all out to win every game and we might surprise a few people.’
      • ‘It also creates the impression that the President is prepared to go all out to get his way at any cost.’
      • ‘Now once again the President of the USA is making plans for an all out effort to put a man on Mars.’
      • ‘Expect the action to be fast and furious as the drivers go all out to win the Southern Championship on the day.’
      strenuously, energetically, vigorously, hard, mightily, with all one's might, with all one's might and main, heartily, with vigour, with great effort, fiercely, intensely, eagerly, enthusiastically, industriously, diligently, assiduously, conscientiously, sedulously, with application, earnestly, with perseverance, persistently, indefatigably
      strenuous, energetic, vigorous, powerful, potent, forceful, forcible
      View synonyms
  • all over

    • 1Completely finished.

      ‘it's all over between us’
      • ‘Gaughan stretched the lead to nine, a minute later and it seemed all over but Castlerea weren't finished.’
      • ‘It's all over, but it could be messy.’
      • ‘It's all over for homophobia.’
      • ‘It’s all over between Shravani and Zaheer.’
      • ‘It’s all over for this systems company. The 20-hour days put in by its CEO and many of its crew of 70 for the last five years have gone for naught.’
      • ‘It's all over between us.’
      • ‘It's all over for the Archbishop.’
      • ‘However, a pal claims that it is all over between them.’
      • ‘It's all over between Kate and Pete, as she chucks out her belongings.’
      • ‘I can't believe it's all over!’
      • ‘So you think it's all over?’
    • 2Everywhere.

      ‘there were bodies all over’
      • ‘The past pupils came from all over to join in the celebrations.’
      • ‘I radioed in that there was oil all over, but I got through it and we finished in one piece.’
      everywhere, all over, all around, in all places, in every place, far and wide, far and near, here, there, and everywhere, extensively, exhaustively, thoroughly, widely, broadly, in every nook and cranny
      View synonyms
      1. 2.1With reference to all parts of the body.
        ‘I was shaking all over’
        • ‘By the time I was finished I was hurting all over again, but this time I was not going to cry.’
        • ‘By the time he'd finished I was beaming all over, eyes wide in delight as I listened to him.’
        • ‘I'm shaking all over and sweating and my legs feel weak.’
        • ‘My body was shaking all over as I left the room, and I prayed to God I wouldn't trip on the way out.’
        • ‘Sweat was beading on his body, he was shaking all over, and he was breathing hard.’
    • 3Typical of the person mentioned.

      ‘that's our management all over!’
      • ‘See, that's you all over.’
      • ‘That's him all over: irreverent, outspoken, outrageously good company.’
      characteristic, in character, in keeping, to be expected, usual, normal, par for the course, predictable, true to form, true to type
      View synonyms
    • 4Effusively attentive to (someone)

      ‘James was all over her’
      • ‘Every time a 'hunk' shows up, they're all over him.’
      • ‘Becky, now awake, lived up to her billing for her character and was all over Mike.’
      • ‘If I were 15 years younger I'd be all over her,' he thought.’
      • ‘I went to the party and I had women all over me.’
  • all around

    • 1In all respects.

      ‘it was a bad day all around’
    • 2For or by each person.

      ‘drinks all around’
      ‘good acting all around’
  • all's well that ends well

    • proverb If the outcome of a situation is happy, this compensates for any previous difficulty or unpleasantness.

      • ‘So the punter is now exceedingly happy with his connection, and all's well that ends well.’
      • ‘However, all's well that ends well with Joseph reconciling himself with his brothers and a new sister - Jamin.’
      • ‘Keep mentioning who he's supposed to be and if he fails to answer at one point then all's well that ends well.’
      • ‘As Shakespeare noted, all's well that ends well, and Warren is going out in style with mordant humor intact and head held high after a decidedly up and down career as a person.’
      • ‘She's now had two kids and is happily married, he's getting married, so all's well that ends well, but at the time it was bit ‘hairy’.’
  • all that —

  • all there

    • informal usually with negativeIn full possession of one's mental faculties.

      ‘he's not quite all there’
      • ‘There's another wee guy who was not quite all there and he used to go into the record shop and ask for Elvis' latest hit.’
      • ‘You're not all there are you Mike? You should think seriously about getting some professional help.’
      • ‘He stalks this girl he's in love with, but he's not all there.’
      • ‘He was now looking at me as if I was not all there.’
      sensible, well adjusted, reasonable, rational, level-headed, sound, practical, discerning, logical, able to think clearly, lucid, clear-headed, coherent
      View synonyms
  • all together

    • All in one place or in a group; all at once.

      ‘they arrived all together’
      Compare with altogether
      ‘5,000 people all together’
      • ‘We all left together and I remember walking all together to the kerb edge.’
      • ‘It has been a while since I have had a lot of my friends all together in one place and it proves to be a fantastic night!’
      • ‘But you can't do much more than that until all the players are back and we are all together.’
      • ‘Hubbs and I had tears in our eyes at the sight of seeing them all together again, all alive.’
      • ‘The first episode is supposed to introduce the characters and why exactly they're all together.’
      • ‘Before the evening was over I went to get my neighbor Jan to take a picture of us all together on my deck.’
      • ‘There will be two million people of my age in Marienfeld camping out on the one night all together.’
      • ‘And yet taken all together there is far more to the loss of these seats than these localised factors.’
      • ‘Going back to the good old days of doing nothing and doing it all together is no longer a possibility.’
      together, all together, as a group, in a body, as one, as a whole, in a mass, wholesale
      View synonyms
  • all told

    • In total.

      ‘they tried a dozen times all told’
      • ‘The huge increase in health spending has brought a staff rise of 160,00, with the NHS now employing 1.3 million all told.’
      • ‘They have won three out of the last four championships and all told, have won a total of seven.’
      • ‘Anyhow, I ended up coming out feeling springy and fit, and only missed breaking my record by 60 seconds, so it wasn't so bad, all told.’
      • ‘So, a surprising weekend all told - it's going to be a lot fun showing our guest just a taste of what this fine little colony has to offer.’
      • ‘SRU supremo Bill Watson said that Premiership One clubs will lose an average of two players, which is up to 20 players all told.’
      • ‘It is, all told, one of the purest experiences you can have.’
      • ‘So February looks to be pretty promising all told.’
      • ‘Yet all told, its simplicities are gloriously redeemed by the novel's intricate take on sexuality, and its ecstatic and gilded prose.’
      • ‘Red Deer Press did well, with five awards all told, but even this didn't match their 1999 performance.’
      • ‘Unlike the Smiths, there were probably only a dozen men all told in this group.’
      in all, all told, in toto, taken together, in sum, counting them all
      View synonyms
  • all the way

    • informal Without limit or reservation.

      ‘I'm with you all the way’
      See also "go all the way" at way
      • ‘We need support from relatives behind us all the way if we are to push for extra money.’
      • ‘The married dad of two is dedicated to the school say colleagues, who back him all the way.’
      • ‘If the government decides that military action is the way to go, then I will back them all the way.’
      • ‘If this really were a matter of social freedom then I would back them all the way.’
      • ‘As long as our concerns are left outstanding we will fight this development all the way.’
      completely, totally, absolutely, entirely, wholly, fully, thoroughly, quite, altogether, one hundred per cent, downright, outright, unqualifiedly, in all respects, unconditionally, perfectly, implicitly, unrestrictedly, really, veritably, categorically, consummately, undisputedly, unmitigatedly, wholeheartedly, radically, stark, just, to the hilt, to the core, all the way, to the maximum extent, extremely, infinitely, unlimitedly, limitlessly, ultimately
      View synonyms
  • — and all

    • 1Used to emphasize something additional that is being referred to.

      ‘she threw her coffee over him, mug and all’
      • ‘We don't want to miss the start, so we head to the gig, bags and all, leaving the baffled hotel staff in the dust.’
      • ‘She climbed into her bed, clothes and all, and went to sleep.’
      • ‘He grabbed his plate and hurled it, food and all, against the wall.’
      1. 1.1informal As well.
        ‘it must hit him hard, being so young and all’
        • ‘I know he still really cares for me and all, but it's like, painful for him to think about other me with other guys.’
        • ‘He'd never pick me, being his son and so young and all.’
        as well, also, too, besides, into the bargain, in addition, additionally, on top, on top of that, over and above that, what's more, moreover, furthermore
        View synonyms
  • at all

    • with negative or in questions(used for emphasis) in any way; to any extent.

      ‘I don't like him at all’
      ‘did he suffer at all?’
      • ‘She works full time and if she has children at all it will be as late as possible.’
      • ‘The criticism really wasn't accurate at all.’
      • ‘One of them is poor to the extent that their parent cannot afford to support them at all.’
      • ‘They have no principles, at all.’
      • ‘I don't think that the government will change at all.’
      • ‘Most of us would probably want to stay in bed if at all possible and give advice over the phone.’
      • ‘There were eight children and no groceries, no money to buy soap, no money to buy anything at all.’
      • ‘He added that people had been advised to avoid the Ashchurch area if at all possible.’
      conceivably, under any circumstances, by any means, at all, in any way
      View synonyms
  • be all about —

    • informal Be focused on or interested in (a particular thing)

      ‘school has become my refuge and I'm all about being the perfect student’
      • ‘This is a relationship business and we're all about that.’
      • ‘I have a friend who is all about the show, in fact, and sings its praises quite strongly.’
      • ‘Flavors, I am all about the flavors, baby.’
      • ‘He'll never be typecast because he's all about defining himself in a persona.’
      • ‘Apparently they're all about taking credit for the end result.’
      • ‘I am all about creating memories with my family.’
      • ‘I'm all about making life more convenient.’
      • ‘Todd is very intelligent and is all about media and everything film.’
      • ‘Believing in the supposedly impossible is what he is all about.’
      • ‘Thanks guys, we got it already - you're all about the family unit.’
      • ‘If you're watching this movie, you're all about the kung fu.’
      • ‘I know that both Jim and Mike feel this way, that Welles was all about pulling off an amazing effect for the viewer.’
      • ‘In fact, I am all about the love.’
      • ‘I am all about the thrill of movement.’
      • ‘She's all about making sure we don't portray women in a bad light, take advantage of women, or exploit them in any way.’
      • ‘We're all about the customer.’
  • be all one to someone

    • Make no difference to.

      ‘simple cases or hard cases, it's all one to me’
      • ‘The audience, the organizers, the two presiding media (newspapers and radio), are all one to him.’
      • ‘Look, simple cases or hard cases, it's one to me.’
      • ‘Interviews could come and interviews could go; it was all one to the punters.’
      • ‘It was all one to Danny whether they set up a republic or a skittle alley afterwards.’
      • ‘This is probably doubtful; yet it is all one to me; what she is were nothing to me if she would but go by herself and not talk.’
  • be all very well

    • informal Used to express criticism or rejection of a favorable or consoling remark.

      ‘your proposal is all very well in theory, but in practice it will not pay’
      • ‘Mere managerial ability was all very well, he continued, but it wasn't enough.’
      • ‘Restoration of Victorian values is all very well, but it does not strike me as particularly practical.’
      • ‘It's all very well to set up a waste recycling scheme, but surely, it's better not to create it in the first place.’
      • ‘That's all very well, of course, but little consolation when the wins stop coming.’
      • ‘I mean, this is all very well as a hobby, but will blogging put food on the table?’
      • ‘It is all very well to criticise that action, but we need to come up with a solution by way of an alternative.’
      • ‘This is all very well, but it is quite a leap to say that it is morally wrong to pay people to do unfulfilling work.’
      • ‘Pragmatism is all very well, but there are blunter ways to describe the new state of mind.’
      • ‘It is all very well to say it is great to be competing with sides like Legion but this has to be looked on as a game thrown away.’
      • ‘Expressing regret is all very well, but restitution of those rights is also required.’
  • in all

    • In total number; altogether.

      ‘there were about 5,000 people in all’
      • ‘There are three flats in all at the address and it seems to be quiet and secluded.’
      • ‘There were, of course, wines to accompany this: 13 of them in all.’
      • ‘We had a family meal (there were 14 of us in all) in a posh hotel.’
      • ‘In all, 250 students from 25 colleges made it to the finals of various events organised as part of the festival.’
      • ‘In all, there are eight changes from the run-one side that beat Australia in Sydney.’
      • ‘The caravans, up to twenty in all, were moved on by the weekend.’
      • ‘They each take turns telling stories, one hundred in all, in the garden.’
      • ‘There were four tents in all, three for the thirty male soldiers and one for the ten females.’
      • ‘It's just over a mile in all, and I arrive back wheezing for breath but alive and well.’
      • ‘In all, 10 candidates attended the Colloquium from a total of five countries.’
      in all, all told, in toto, taken together, in sum, counting them all
      View synonyms
  • on (or on to) all fours

    • On hands and knees or (of an animal) on all four legs rather than just the hind ones.

      ‘Frankie scuttled away on all fours’
      • ‘This involves going into a standing split, which I easily can do, with the operated leg out behind me, and then sinking on to all fours on the other knee.’
      • ‘The bear dropped back on to all fours and I thought it was going to come at me, kill me.’
      • ‘The ground shook violently as the bear crashed down on to all fours.’
      • ‘Many babies pull themselves over on to all fours and start to crawl.’
      • ‘Finally, roll over on to all fours to a stable table-like position with your hands and knees about shoulder width apart.’
      • ‘Occasionally she almost gets on to all fours, but then sits down again.’
      • ‘Go on to all fours (as above) ensuring your shoulders are above your wrists and your hips are above your knees.’
      • ‘I began to get pushy feelings at the end of each contraction, so I got off the loo and on to all fours on the bathroom floor.’
      • ‘Begin the series by coming on to all fours with the wrists underneath the shoulders and the knees underneath the hips.’
      • ‘Come on to all fours in a neutral table top position.’
  • all along

    • All the time; from the beginning.

      ‘she'd known all along’
      • ‘It wants to pretend that it has the answers, and has known them all along.’
      • ‘And then I got two or three more people to explain it to me and it turns out I understood it all along.’
      • ‘As we said all along, it is the intervention, it is the appropriate mediation.’
      • ‘Jonah just smiled, and I got the distinct impression he'd been planning this all along.’
      • ‘Luckily for Honey, her ticket to fame and fortune has been lurking at her club all along.’
      • ‘The concern all along was that the team would not be able to match the other physically.’
      • ‘Perhaps part of the attraction had all along been that he wasn't available as a husband, and so as king.’
      • ‘This might not be so surprising; maybe it is what the supermarket critics wanted all along.’
      • ‘It's there, maybe it was even there all along because it's so hard to find.’
      • ‘Rather, you sense the witches' tidings confirm something he has suspected all along.’
      • ‘Then we took mom out for dinner and pretended that we had remembered her birthday all along.’
      • ‘Even Samantha wanted true love in the end: it turned out that she'd been scared of it all along.’
      • ‘Katz also said he knew all along that the letter-writing project could backfire.’
      • ‘He made some statements that are pure gold, and it is stuff that we have been saying all along.’
      • ‘The urge to prove that they have been right all along is so much greater than the need to adapt to new circumstances.’
      • ‘I think it goes to show that, perhaps, just perhaps, Bridget was right all along.’
      • ‘But he says that all along there was evidence to prove the booking was legitimate.’
      • ‘They knew all along how big and important this day was for them and for us who were part of the college.’
      • ‘He might be lost in the thickets of the English language; they knew all along that money talks.’
      • ‘She then sighed the sigh of a defeated woman before telling me what i'd wanted all along.’
  • all and sundry

    • Everyone.

      ‘insolent drivers crying to all and sundry to get out of the way’
      • ‘The term has been enthusiastically jumped on by all and sundry (as a web search shows).’
      • ‘By the time I got home in the evening the temperature here had plummeted to barely above zero and a strong wind was blowing all and sundry around.’
      • ‘Half a dozen Canterbury players breathed a sigh of relief, then demanded apologies from all and sundry.’
      • ‘I should never have tempted fate a couple of weeks ago by proudly declaring to all and sundry that I had never been suspended in my career.’
      • ‘It's a scam that includes everyone because it has the effect of appearing to benefit all and sundry.’
      • ‘In days gone by it would, with great authority, thunder out opinion on all and sundry, quite often influencing policy in so doing.’
      • ‘I have exasperated all and sundry and got on everyone's nerves.’
      • ‘Who was the girl who, after being rude to all and sundry, got very drunk at a recent press event?’
      • ‘Promises have been made to all and sundry that increases, indeed, large increases, will follow.’
      • ‘This has been handed in to Bradford Council and now lies gathering dust in the planning office, completely ignored by all and sundry.’
      • ‘So, plans are in place to make for a good time for all and sundry.’
      • ‘The runner up impressed all and sundry and is one to keep in mind.’
      • ‘But in his haste to maximise takings by admitting all and sundry, Mr Doan has alienated his customer base.’
      • ‘Honestly, I would not want to justify or defend what I write to all and sundry.’
      • ‘She went to the opening and has been raving about it to all and sundry but what they managed on opening night doesn't seem to have been carried through.’
      • ‘When he gets back to Leeside, the unidentified fan will no doubt be showing his classic snap to all and sundry for many years to come.’
      • ‘Judged on her two runs this term she has lost none of her sparkle, and she has been tipped by all and sundry for today's big race.’
      • ‘Chances are you will have already seen this commercial, which has been linked by all and sundry over the past few days.’
      • ‘Jasper, the eight-year-old macaw, was on top form, singing, talking and clicking his tongue at all and sundry.’
      • ‘We also encourage all and sundry to support the minister's efforts - he cannot do it alone.’
      everyone, everybody, every person, each person, each one, each and every one, all, one and all, the whole world, the world at large, the public, the general public, people everywhere
      View synonyms

Origin

Old English all, eall, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch al and German all.

Pronunciation

all

/ôl//ɔl/