Definition of alder in English:

alder

(also alder tree)

noun

  • A widely distributed tree of the birch family that has toothed leaves and bears male catkins and woody female cones.

    • ‘Pollen studies by scientists have revealed that both of the island chains were once covered in dense woodlands of birch, alder, willow, hazel, rowan and aspen.’
    • ‘Trees which are especially suited for erosion control include varieties of birch, cedar, alder, fir, pine and redwood.’
    • ‘The River Derwent was brown and high, ducks sheltered in eddies, and little birds flitted from alder to willow to alder.’
    • ‘Just 14 acrres of broadleaf woodland remain, including oak, ash, alder and birch and several large yew trees.’
    • ‘In Prussia the coal of the alder, limetree, poplar, elder, willow, hemp, and hazel is used for powder.’
    • ‘The train passes mature hardwood maple, beech, yellow birch, hickory and American linden trees, and softwood alders and willows weeping over a calm pond.’
    • ‘Apple, willow, birch, poplar, citrus, alder and maple are varieties we have used.’
    • ‘Birds nest in them, and bring in seeds of other trees like alders and oaks.’
    • ‘The native trees planted include oak, ash, birch, alder, hazel, yew, and Scots pine.’
    • ‘The landscape's rustic tone is anticipated as visitors approach along a nearly mile-long driveway lined with redwood, alder, fir and madrone trees.’
    • ‘For the first time in 2,000 years, Scots pine, alder, birch, hazel, holly, and mountain ash are set to reclaim a large swath of the Scottish Highlands.’
    • ‘Everything would be awash in pale yellow-green with cattails on the alders, and the maples trailing green seed plumes.’
    • ‘Much of the weed was cleared out to allow easy angling, though plenty of silver birch, rowan, alder, sycamore and pine remain to provide a scenic backdrop.’
    • ‘The total of the 10 lots listed was 788 oaks, over 350 alders and birches, over 230 holly, and over 120 ash.’
    • ‘The most suitable trees for bulbs and tubers are alder, ash, birch, cherry / Japanese cherry, oak and fruit trees.’
    • ‘Stunted forms of tree species such as dwarf birch, alder, arctic willow, white spruce, black spruce, tamarack, least willow, net-veined willow and blue-green willow grow here.’
    • ‘Oak and hazel were probably dominant, but with an intermixture of other species, including birch, alder - a tree of wetlands - ash and elm, which varied regionally.’
    • ‘The mouths of side streams also attract fish - more so if there is some overhead cover from willows, alders or some other trees.’
    • ‘The picture is then traced onto the boards, using a pointer or toothed wheel, and marked out with cones from the alder tree or with coffee beans.’
    • ‘The newly planted trees include oak, ash, Scots pine, yew, birch and alder.’

Origin

Old English alor, aler, of Germanic origin; related to German Erle; forms spelled with d are recorded from the 14th century.

Pronunciation:

alder

/ˈôldər/