Main definitions of agist in US English:

: agist1agist2

agist1

verb

[with object]
  • Take in and feed (livestock) for payment.

    ‘the dairy farmer might wish to agist lambs after the cows are housed for the winter’
    • ‘Market forces would soon sort out the cattlemen who are agitating to continue agisting their livestock in alpine national parks.’
    • ‘Well I agist my horses which means that I pay someone else to feed them in the morning and at night and take their rugs on and off, but I do everything else.’
    • ‘Thankfully, Molly and Jolly sheep, normally passengers in the trailer behind the bus, were agisting in Lismore at the time.’
    • ‘My parents have often hired earth-working vehicles, installing three further dams since arriving here in an effort to drought-proof the house's garden, and to allow them to agist neighbours' animals during droughts.’
    • ‘One of the brothers had left to attempt to find land to agist their stock.’
    • ‘However by the start of the 1850s the Government Farm was used extensively by the government of the day to grow fodder, particularly hay, agisting of government horses used by the police in the gold escorts and the Survey Department.’
    • ‘Now, as good seasons arrive, he buys cattle and agists them, then as the El Nino weather cycle ‘starts to swing and the door closes’, sells them off at a great profit, and does something else while the drought lasts.’

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘use or allow the use of land for pasture’): from Old French agister, from a- (from Latin ad ‘to, at’) + gister, from giste ‘lodging’.

Pronunciation

agist

/ˈeɪdʒɪst//ˈājist/

Main definitions of agist in US English:

: agist1agist2

agist2

noun

Pronunciation

agist

/ˈeɪdʒɪst//ˈājist/