Definition of affinity in English:

affinity

noun

  • 1A spontaneous or natural liking or sympathy for someone or something.

    ‘he has an affinity for the music of Berlioz’
    • ‘This time round, her verse resonates with her strokes on canvas and though this has not been deliberate, there is, as she admits, a natural affinity between the two.’
    • ‘They have a natural affinity with traditional country music which is the kind I do in my show.’
    • ‘The natural affinity between these two just seems to be a fact.’
    • ‘He showed a special affinity for the understanding and performance of the music of Rachmaninoff.’
    • ‘She has a natural affinity for the little-sister role, and has begun to follow Adrianne everywhere she goes.’
    • ‘Dolphins have a natural affinity with humans and just being with them, playing with them and touching them, is credited with bringing about wondrous results for sick people.’
    • ‘This dolphin later turned up in Grace Bay in 1980 and demonstrated a natural affinity with people.’
    • ‘He had a natural affinity with the tribe and would never miss an opportunity to be with them, interact with them and frequently get into discussions with them.’
    • ‘Teenagers have a natural affinity with the colour black as it saves having to change clothes everyday and time spent on needlessly choosing which outfit to wear today.’
    • ‘She had a natural affinity with the country way of life and she relished the various tasks synonymous with the changing seasons.’
    • ‘As you say, you have no experience, but I have seen you with William and you appear to have a natural affinity with children.’
    • ‘He was born with a natural affinity for the outdoors: he loved the mountains and rivers, as well as the forests and farms, birds, insects, wolves and bears.’
    • ‘For someone with such an affinity for the natural world, it's not surprising to discover that another passion of Baxter is conservation.’
    • ‘There is a natural affinity between the pair and Freddie said he can't believe how close they have grown.’
    • ‘People of her generation had a natural affinity with the soil and through it they were connected to the best medicine of all… nature.’
    • ‘She discovered she had an affinity with horses immediately’
    • ‘His employers realized his natural affinity for creating interesting smokes and immediately suspended all his other duties in favor of research.’
    • ‘Ten years later, the two women meet at their children's school and find that they have a natural affinity for one another.’
    • ‘He was most at home when working on the land and had a natural affinity with country people.’
    • ‘There is, or ought to be, a natural affinity between community supported radio stations and community supported farms.’
    empathy, rapport, sympathy, accord, harmony, like-mindedness
    relationship, bond, connection, propinquity
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A similarity of characteristics suggesting a relationship, especially a resemblance in structure between animals, plants, or languages.
      ‘a building with no affinity to contemporary architectural styles’
      • ‘Dresser's style was never dictated by dogmatic theories, but had a general affinity to the art of the early English Middle Ages and also suggested his admiration for Asian art.’
      • ‘Furthermore, as is typical of many phylogenetic problematica, myzostomids feature a mixture of characteristics that suggest affinities with disparate taxa.’
      • ‘The provenance signature instead suggests that the Sta Series has a closer affinity to the Northern Gneisses and may in a general sense represent a deformed cover sequence.’
      • ‘Shaped by the fastidious Harnoncourt, the central andante movement opens with a horn theme that whispers an affinity to the Largo from the New World symphony.’
      • ‘It seems that the dualistic language has an innate affinity to directive speech acts (in a second-person perspective).’
      • ‘The researcher suggested a close affinity to Tetraodontiformes, although this idea has not been generally accepted.’
      • ‘All investigated specimens show a remarkable affinity to D. (A.) tyrolensis.’
      • ‘Not surprisingly, we can see an affinity to Warhol's early films in this series of paintings.’
      • ‘Many of those are incompletely preserved, and some are decidedly tubular in appearance, calling into question their affinity to the Hyolitha.’
      • ‘Some authors have suggested a close relationship between cycads and Lyginopteris, but most favor an affinity to Medullosan seed plants.’
      • ‘He also suggested that Polyzoniida may have a closer affinity to Glomeridesmida than to the other colobognath taxa.’
      • ‘In its scale and some of its details Smith's building has an affinity to Richardson's 1875-1876 Hayden Building in Boston.’
      • ‘No fossils in the California Permian collection, other than the ‘hydrozoan’ described here, show a close affinity to Tethyan forms.’
      • ‘The meta-compound also loses binding specificity and it binds to AT- and GC-rich sequences with similar, relatively low affinities.’
      • ‘Nevertheless, ANII-DIN clearly had a higher affinity to the test sequences than ANI-NVS.’
    2. 1.2Relationship, especially by marriage as opposed to blood ties.
      • ‘These might be brief glossaries, grammatical or rhetorical definitions, astronomical diagrams, tables of kindred and affinity, accounts, or tests of penmanship by the apprentice.’
      • ‘Early Carboniferous coral faunas of the block have a strong Eurasian affinity, with two recognized coral faunas from two ecological facies having been recognized.’
      • ‘The bulk of local people were from the same Pashtun tribal stock as the Afghans of Kandahar and Jalalabad, and they felt close cultural and tribal affinity with those over the border.’
      • ‘Relational proximity is shaped by cultural affinity and facilitated by spatial and institutional proximity.’
      • ‘Related to this notion of communal affinity is ‘social closure’.’
      • ‘His recent utterances have shown him to have a more than ethnic affinity with Disraeli; and these are times that demand the Disraelian touch.’
      • ‘They generally feel a kinship and affinity with other types.’
      • ‘However, many states only punished relationships between first cousins and closer, and others only punished relationships of consanguinity, but not affinity.’
      • ‘These connections reflect ideological, not ethnic, affinity.’
      • ‘Across the continent there were marked continuities in physical characteristics and cultural features, and many linkages based on relations of kinship, affinity, exchange, and religion.’
      • ‘Croats also began to look to Serbs and other southern Slavs as people with whom they shared a linguistic and cultural affinity.’
      • ‘Yet she is also conscious of her own gypsy blood, of her affinity with these creatures.’
      • ‘Inter-confessional marriage and inter-confessional aid are expressions of social affinity.’
      • ‘There are hints of affinity in the terms used for these partnerships: baere is also romantic partner and kale is a term for spouse.’
      • ‘Peoples with no particular affinity toward each other are bound together in a state that was largely externally created and not the outcome of local political processes.’
      • ‘Use of the same island at the same time and the synchronization of seasonal and annual movements were not directly linked to any social affinity between the two individuals.’
    3. 1.3Biochemistry
      The degree to which a substance tends to combine with another.
      ‘the affinity of hemoglobin for oxygen’
      • ‘Besides the long-range interactions it makes with neighboring protease residues, the binding affinity of a peptide also depends on its own conformation.’
      • ‘Several of these results were based on measurements of binding affinities between specific residues in S4 and in the pore domain.’
      • ‘In the context of the affinity of hemoglobin for oxygen there are four primary regulators, each of which has a negative impact.’
      • ‘Our data do not pose any reason to suspect that we deal with gadolinium complexes of variable valence or that the affinity of binding sites changes with their density or occupancy.’
      • ‘When the divalent cation dissociates from actin, the affinity of actin for nucleotide is greatly reduced.’

Origin

Middle English (in the sense relationship by marriage): via Old French from Latin affinitas, from affinis related (literally bordering on), from ad- to + finis border.

Pronunciation:

affinity

/əˈfinədē/