Definition of affectation in English:

affectation

noun

  • 1Behavior, speech, or writing that is artificial and designed to impress.

    ‘the affectation of a man who measures every word for effect’
    ‘she called the room her boudoir, which he thought an affectation’
    • ‘Ri smiled and decided to drop her officious speech affectation.’
    • ‘But showing off is one thing, and vanity is another, and envy is a third, and affectation is something else.’
    • ‘First names are not used, a classic public school affectation.’
    • ‘Surely even most conservatives cringe when they see this type of ridiculous affectation.’
    • ‘Not every American politician could manage this, without affectation.’
    • ‘Donald's love of sport was not some kind of affectation designed to bring him street credibility in constituency walkabouts.’
    • ‘But these techniques are not stylish affectation.’
    • ‘He doesn't use correct punctuation, and I think it may be more affectation than lack of education.’
    • ‘Names drop from her lips without a hint of affectation.’
    • ‘With flamboyance and little affectation, she explained the functions and advantages of optical fibre communication.’
    • ‘Call it affectation if you will, it's still particularly well done.’
    • ‘His work was lucid, direct, perceptive and totally without affectation.’
    • ‘In a lesser artist and person, we might have suspected mere affectation, or an attempt at playing the reluctant genius.’
    • ‘Each of the performers is distinctive because of his or her unique appearance or affectation.’
    • ‘He plays the guitar in an Irish band (it isn't a politician's affectation: they've been going for 20 years).’
    • ‘They had, for whatever did not form part of their group, no affectation of contempt; their genuine contempt was sufficient.’
    • ‘This hint at rags is a fashion, or affectation, that I find offensive.’
    • ‘‘This is perhaps the creator's message,’ continued my vegetarian friend with the pious affectation.’
    • ‘Despite what many of your comrades believe, showering is not just a middle class affectation.’
    • ‘Perhaps this second variety is not style at all, but affectation.’
    pretension, pretentiousness, affectedness, artificiality, insincerity, posturing, posing, pretence, ostentation, grandiosity, snobbery, superciliousness
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    1. 1.1 A studied display of real or pretended feeling.
      ‘an affectation of calm’
      • ‘They charm rather than irritate, because all their eccentricities and affectations are clearly so deeply felt.’
      • ‘Ironic postures, become her target every bit as much as sentimental affectations of feeling.’
      • ‘On a record composed of cinematic affectations, how much of the feeling is real?’
      • ‘But in the end, their gluttony, loneliness, and affectations - their rabid humanity is what interests me.’
      • ‘The actor's affectations are little creepy at some points, but overall, I love the job he did.’
      facade, front, show, appearance, false display, pretence, simulation, posture, pose, sham, fake, act, masquerade, charade, mask, cloak, veil, veneer, guise
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Origin

Mid 16th century: from Latin affectatio(n-), from the verb affectare (see affect).

Pronunciation

affectation

/ˌæfɛkˈteɪʃ(ə)n//ˌafekˈtāSH(ə)n/