Main definitions of affect in English

: affect1affect2affect3

affect1

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Have an effect on; make a difference to.

    ‘the dampness began to affect my health’
    with clause ‘your attitude will affect how successful you are’
    • ‘Apart from the physical effects, he admits his mental health has also been affected.’
    • ‘I needed a place to fully explore cultural differences that affected me as a therapist.’
    • ‘Research from the United States suggests that the neighbourhood you live in can affect how well your children perform at school.’
    • ‘The murder rates of the U.S. and U.K. are also affected by differences in the way each counts homicides.’
    • ‘The effects of the hunger affected each of their kind differently.’
    • ‘Since then, science, health, medicine and technology - and how they affect how we all live - have become central themes on the programme.’
    • ‘It is possible that the difference in setting could affect the way personal topics impact on participation rates.’
    • ‘It is not just the physical effect of rain that affects us all, it is the gloom that goes with it.’
    • ‘Personal mission statements can drive us and affect how we conduct daily journalism.’
    • ‘Towns said the new rule would not affect how his team conducted its attacking or defensive penalty-corners.’
    • ‘Eventually, our ordinary people will be affected with adverse effects on our still fragile economy.’
    • ‘These flow-rate differences affect the glaciers' surface topography.’
    • ‘In this way, the tank fulfills both the physical and the psychological effects needed to affect the enemy's will to fight.’
    • ‘Differences in environment or health status may affect how people respond to subjective assessments.’
    • ‘The demand has also been affected because of the effects of the energy crisis in the year 1973.’
    • ‘A variety of factors can affect how much you pay for insurance, such as where you live, the age and health of your animal and the level of cover you require.’
    • ‘The city has been affected by after effects of the quake, with over 200 casualties reported by police and hospital sources.’
    • ‘This is beginning to affect how the law determines which of these relationships should be given legal recognition.’
    • ‘Battlefield effects on soldiers affected everyone - veterans and young soldiers alike.’
    • ‘Sheila said the pub would continue fundraising but this year's effort had been affected by the effect of the scam.’
    affect, influence, exert influence on, act on, work on, condition, touch, have an impact on, impact on, take hold of, attack, infect, strike, strike at, hit
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Touch the feelings of (someone); move emotionally.
      ‘the atrocities he witnessed have affected him most deeply’
      • ‘I do not remember the last time I was so viscerally affected by a literary account of another person's experience.’
      • ‘Despite admitting to affairs in his rock-star years, he remains terribly affected by her death.’
      • ‘When I saw the documentary "Fahrenheit 9/11," I was really affected by it.’
      • ‘Alison, who is visibly affected by the reappearance of her old lover, at first tries to avoid him.’
      • ‘But these are the stories that affected me, that moved me, that stayed with me.’
      • ‘Salinger's book has powerfully affected, and still affects, so many generations of readers.’
      • ‘I was really affected and touched by the sound of her voice, which differed from any conventional idea of a beautiful voice.’
      touching, moving, emotive, powerful, stirring, impressive, telling, soul-stirring, uplifting, heart-warming
      upset, trouble, hit hard, overwhelm, devastate, damage, hurt, pain, grieve, sadden, distress, disturb, perturb, agitate, shake, shake up, stir
      View synonyms

Usage

Affect and effect are both verbs and nouns, but only effect is common as a noun, usually meaning ‘a result, consequence, impression, etc.’: my father's warnings had no effect on my adventurousness. The noun affect is restricted almost entirely to psychology (see affect). As verbs, they are used differently. Affect most commonly means ‘produce an effect on, influence’: smoking during pregnancy can affect the baby's development. Affect also means ‘pretend to have or feel (something)’ (see affect): she affected a concern for those who had lost their jobs. Effect means ‘bring about’: the negotiators effected an agreement despite many difficulties

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘attack as a disease’): from French affecter or Latin affect- ‘influenced, affected’, from the verb afficere (see affect).

Pronunciation

affect

/əˈfekt//əˈfɛkt/

Main definitions of affect in English

: affect1affect2affect3

affect2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Pretend to have or feel (something)

    ‘as usual I affected a supreme unconcern’
    with infinitive ‘a book that affects to loathe the modern world’
    • ‘But he has always affected a public air of unconcern whenever the subject comes up.’
    • ‘These affect an air of tired superiority in a world of unoriginal humorists.’
    • ‘One can affect unawareness, feign indifference or summon up some other defense against such entreaties.’
    • ‘Although the author affects befuddlement, his book demonstrates an unfaltering sense of self.’
    • ‘The boy then sat on top of the pillow, affecting an air of supreme indifference.’
    pretend, feign, fake, counterfeit, sham, simulate, fabricate, give the appearance of, make a show of, make a pretence of, play at, go through the motions of
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Use, wear, or assume (something) pretentiously or so as to make an impression on others.
      ‘an American who had affected a British accent’
      • ‘Sometimes you become very aware that you're watching an actor affecting crazy mannerisms in a crazy movie.’
      • ‘Rosalinda, who was also invited to the party, arrives there, affecting the airs of a Hungarian countess.’
      • ‘Her haughty tone affected the third voice, giving him the impression that she was annoyed.’
      • ‘He wasn't accepted, even when he affected an accent.’
      • ‘He has enough shirt buttons undone to wear a medallion, but instead affects a necklace.’
      assume, put on, take on, adopt, like, have a liking for, embrace, espouse
      View synonyms

Usage

See affect

Origin

Late Middle English: from French affecter or Latin affectare ‘aim at’, frequentative of afficere ‘work on, influence’, from ad- ‘at, to’ + facere ‘do’. The original sense was ‘like, love’, hence ‘(like to) use, assume, etc.’.

Pronunciation

affect

/əˈfekt//əˈfɛkt/

Main definitions of affect in English

: affect1affect2affect3

affect3

noun

Psychology
  • Emotion or desire, especially as influencing behavior or action.

    • ‘There has also been a need to begin to integrate a focus on affect in behavioral couples therapy.’
    • ‘A third component of reactive aggression is affect, and specifically anger.’
    • ‘By triggering affect and emotion, intolerant behaviors are set in motion.’
    • ‘This, says Jung, is because they confuse feeling with emotion or affect.’
    • ‘We have come a long way from Freud's affect theory to viewing emotions as joining and integrating minds.’

Usage

See affect

Origin

Late 19th century: coined in German from Latin affectus ‘disposition’, from afficere ‘to influence’ (see affect).

Pronunciation