Definition of adventure in English:

adventure

noun

  • 1An unusual and exciting, typically hazardous, experience or activity.

    ‘her recent adventures in Italy’
    • ‘As he readied himself to leave, his mind conjured up images of cities, strange new lands and exciting adventures.’
    • ‘For some children starting kindergarten is an exciting adventure, for others the experience borders on the terrifying.’
    • ‘It is also an exciting adventure and a story of a quest that must be fulfilled.’
    • ‘Unearthing incredible facts and artifacts for the Museum requires some exciting adventures.’
    • ‘The trip is an exciting adventure for Alex and mum Karen who is accompanying him, especially as the location for the shoot was originally going to be Nottingham.’
    • ‘You'll meet fascinating people and have exciting adventures, but do pay attention, Taurus.’
    • ‘I may post our exciting adventures from the road tomorrow night.’
    • ‘Every year brings new adventures, experiences and surprises.’
    • ‘‘I feel as though we're embarking upon an exciting adventure,’ she confessed, her eyes sparkling.’
    • ‘It is a new experience, a new adventure, and we have lots of family and friends who will come out to see us.’
    • ‘In the tale Alice, an innocent enough young girl, steps through her mirror into a magical world where she has a range of exciting adventures.’
    • ‘Does the idea of touring conjure up exciting images of places to see and new foods and adventures to experience in foreign lands?’
    • ‘Read the exciting adventures of Black Bob, the clever sheepdog, in the wilds of Canada.’
    • ‘Starting a business based on a passion is an exciting adventure.’
    • ‘You may find it one of your most exciting adventures.’
    • ‘So grab your day pack, and get ready for some exciting adventures!’
    • ‘For Charlie, who has suffered heart and lung problems since he was born prematurely, the weekend is set to be packed with exciting adventures.’
    • ‘She said she is certain he would approve of her daring adventures.’
    • ‘A holiday in this province can be an exciting adventure.’
    • ‘Even for veteran scuba divers such as myself, an excursion on a submarine is an exciting adventure.’
    exploit, escapade, deed, feat, trial, experience, incident, occurrence, event, happening, episode, affair
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    1. 1.1 Daring and exciting activity calling for enterprise and enthusiasm.
      ‘she traveled the world in search of adventure’
      ‘a sense of adventure’
      • ‘This was what I had always dreamed of, true excitement and adventure.’
      • ‘Travelling by train has always been associated with romance and adventure, and one of the best ways to see the east coast of the States is by doing just that.’
      • ‘The danger, excitement and adventure of racing yachts on the high seas awaits a North Yorkshire woman, picked to take part in one of the world's toughest yacht races.’
      • ‘There is something endlessly appealing about this film, a sense of adventure and excitement as seen through the lens of a Hollywood of a more innocent time.’
      • ‘Men crave adventure, risk, danger and heroic sacrifice.’
      • ‘What happened to that sense of academic adventure, excitement and curiosity?’
      • ‘But suppressing their sense of adventure and insulating them from risk is not good for their long-term development.’
      • ‘But the people I met find excitement and adventure, an extraordinary sense of freedom.’
      • ‘I am armed with a sense of adventure, and excited for what awaits.’
      • ‘There is, of course, some thrill and sense of adventure in this sudden departure to a wholly new country and continent.’
      • ‘A walled and deserted garden provides the idea place for adventure and excitement for the town's children, until its owner returns.’
      • ‘What is lacking is suitable play equipment for our children to explore and develop their sense of adventure and excitement.’
      • ‘The past year was full of adventure and excitement.’
      • ‘As for those choosing to trek, this activity will mean thrill, excitement and adventure.’
      • ‘There was so much excitement and adventure in this story that really made me think about my life, in particular what I take for granted.’
      • ‘She is a woman accustomed to both adventure and danger.’
      • ‘There was a flushed look on his face, as if the thrill of danger and adventure was something he dearly missed.’
      • ‘I go out looking for adventure and risk, so I can feel alive.’
      • ‘You are a roamer and need adventure, excitement, and freedom.’
      • ‘Rome offers you a wide range of excitement, adventure, and enjoyment.’
      excitement, exciting experience, thrill, stimulation
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    2. 1.2archaic A commercial speculation.
      • ‘The first recorded case of an Indian being christened here was bound up with British commercial adventures in South Asia.’
      • ‘At this stage in history, the merchant class, desperate for money to finance their adventures, struggled with the monopoly of the moneylenders and overcame it.’
      • ‘The only downside to my commercial adventure is the mischief being done to the American dollar.’
      enterprise, undertaking, project, scheme, pursuit, operation, endeavour, campaign, activity, act, deed, move, measure, task, exploit, mission, trial
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verb

[NO OBJECT]dated
  • 1Engage in hazardous and exciting activity, especially the exploration of unknown territory.

    ‘they had adventured into the forest’
    • ‘To prevent further adventuring, these emperors made it a capital offense to build a boat with more than two masts.’
    • ‘The European seaman is prudent when adventuring out to sea.’
    • ‘I have been out adventuring again today at the Karori Wildlife Sanctuary.’
    • ‘Wills, a three-year-old black and white cat, decided to go adventuring.’
    • ‘For the time being, bushwacking will still be permitted, as will adventuring on unofficial boot trails, but protecting low-use zones will be a high priority.’
    1. 1.1with object Put (something, especially money or one's life) at risk.
      ‘he adventured $3,000 in the purchase of land’
      • ‘The adventurers were so called because they lent or adventured money to parliament.’
      • ‘Before they killed him he said, ‘I have adventured my life in endeavouring to obtain the liberty of my countrymen, and I am a willing sacrifice in their cause.’’
      • ‘The document contains lists of the men and women who adventured money to the Virginia Company.’
      • ‘In at least two battles, he had adventured his life for love of liberty.’
      • ‘Why had she adventured her life on a bold impulse to satisfy mere curiosity?’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French aventure (noun), aventurer (verb), based on Latin adventurus ‘about to happen’, from advenire ‘arrive’.

Pronunciation