Definition of admissible in English:

admissible

adjective

  • 1Acceptable or valid, especially as evidence in a court of law.

    ‘the Court unanimously held that the hearsay was admissible’
    ‘legally admissible evidence’
    • ‘The rules of the commission provided more room to maneuver and allowed for a broader range of admissible evidence.’
    • ‘I was pleased that the bill enunciates the principle that all relevant evidence is admissible unless there is a policy reason to exclude it.’
    • ‘They enable the court to control the evidence by excluding evidence otherwise admissible and limiting cross-examination.’
    • ‘His qualifications were called into question, but I accept he had admissible evidence to give.’
    • ‘The principal task of the courts will continue to be to ensure that, whatever the range of admissible evidence, coincidence is not confused with proof.’
    • ‘Their eye-witness accounts were not admissible in court as evidence.’
    • ‘The court was left with no admissible evidence on this point.’
    • ‘In all such instances, after due consideration I was satisfied that the evidence was relevant and admissible.’
    • ‘This information will be admissible as evidence in the court of law.’
    • ‘For any proposed fresh evidence to be admissible the following four criteria must be satisfied.’
    • ‘I doubt very much that such evidence would be admissible in an Australian court.’
    • ‘In China, private detectives are not allowed to testify in court, and tape-recorded evidence is not admissible.’
    • ‘The new Criminal Justice Bill would make hear-say evidence more readily admissible in court.’
    • ‘That being so, the finding by the trial judge that the accused was guilty of the offence was not supported by admissible evidence.’
    • ‘Whether such a statement is admissible as evidence is a matter for the courts to decide.’
    • ‘The British government wants to make them admissible evidence in British courts.’
    • ‘It is likely that the court will accept that this evidence is admissible, since the strict common law rule is generally ignored.’
    • ‘Further the opinion evidence now tendered relies upon factual statements which are still not supported by any admissible evidence.’
    • ‘The onus is now on legal council to establish evidence that is admissible in court of noncompliance on the part of the debtors.’
    • ‘There is no merit in this claim of deficiency, on the evidence properly admissible before me.’
    allowable, allowed, permissible, permitted, acceptable, passable, tolerable, satisfactory, justifiable, defensible, supportable, well founded, tenable, sound, sensible, reasonable
    legitimate, lawful, legal, licit, within the law, above board, valid, recognized, sanctioned
    ok, okay, legit, kosher, pukka, by the book
    View synonyms
  • 2Having the right to be admitted to a place.

    ‘foreigners were admissible only as temporary workers’
    • ‘The green card is given to foreigners who are admissible.’
    • ‘However, the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada limit the number of students admissible without a first degree to 10 percent.’
    • ‘All academic documents show the student admissible except for language proficiency.’

Origin

Early 17th century: from medieval Latin admissibilis, from Latin admittere (see admit).

Pronunciation:

admissible

/ədˈmisəb(ə)l/