Main definitions of adduct in English

: adduct1adduct2

adduct1

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • (of a muscle) move (a limb or other part of the body) toward the midline of the body or toward another part.

    The opposite of abduct
    • ‘Then, isometrically contract the pectoral muscle, attempting to adduct the arm.’
    • ‘Two possible effective responses would have been to flex the knee on the side of the higher foot, or to have adducted one leg and abducted the other.’
    • ‘Is it the oblique eye muscles or the superior or inferior recti that adduct the eye?’
    • ‘The affected arm is flexed at the elbow and adducted against the side of the body.’
    • ‘A recent consensus document suggests that the arm should not be extended behind the back or adducted in an extreme position for a substantial amount of time.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: back-formation from late Middle English adduction, from late Latin adductio(n-) bringing forward from the verb adducere bring in (see adduce).

Pronunciation:

adduct

/əˈdəkt/

Main definitions of adduct in English

: adduct1adduct2

adduct2

noun

Chemistry
  • The product of an addition reaction between two compounds.

    • ‘Rodents eating unfried pancakes had only one-tenth that concentration of acrylamide adducts.’
    • ‘Moreover, some photoactivable compounds can also produce bulky adducts.’
    • ‘Under these irradiation conditions, another major class of oxidative damage occurs, namely the formation of covalent protein-DNA adducts.’
    • ‘It has been known for some time that smoking can give rise to acrylamide in human red cells that forms adducts with haemoglobin.’
    • ‘In rat liver, it has been shown that tamoxifen forms covalent DNA adducts, implying a genotoxic mechanism for its carcinogenicity in this tissue.’

Origin

1940s: from German Addukt (blend of Addition and Produkt).

Pronunciation:

adduct

/əˈdəkt/