Definition of action in English:

action

noun

  • 1The fact or process of doing something, typically to achieve an aim.

    ‘he vowed to take tougher action against persistent offenders’
    ‘if there is a breach of regulations, we will take action’
    • ‘She said emissions to air, waste management and water eutrophication required urgent action.’
    • ‘As with all security audits, should the results require remedial action, such actions will be taken.’
    • ‘What can be done about it and what effects will any action have on the rest of the economy and the environment?’
    • ‘He was also a source of ideas and plans for covert action to influence the course of the war.’
    • ‘One of the callers threatened to take action against the attackers.’
    • ‘People need to write their Congressmen about this and demand the Army take action.’
    • ‘Assuming that the figures are an effective measure of overall hospital performance, what action should then follow?’
    • ‘If so, it is important to know your rights and how to take action against unfair work practices.’
    • ‘The congressman behind the report will tell us how he's planning to take action.’
    • ‘I know that some have argued that we should take action to achieve a very much smaller population.’
    • ‘When we demand the government take action in a field we no nothing about we are courting disaster.’
    • ‘Their action had the desired effect of restoring confidence in the market and helped the bullion price to begin its recent recovery.’
    • ‘Elections are the paramount means for influencing governmental action.’
    • ‘Postal services could be hit by prolonged strike action over plans to process North Yorkshire's mail in Leeds at weekends.’
    • ‘Secondly, we may consider the effects of human action on the environment itself.’
    • ‘Both unions have threatened strike action if their demands are not met.’
    • ‘But the speech had had the desired effect: public health action had finally been galvanised.’
    • ‘With the local prosecutor declining to take action, the issue has probably peaked.’
    • ‘I did in fact take action at that time on advice from officials to address these concerns.’
    • ‘It would take a change in the minister of state to really effect some action.’
    steps, measures, activity, movement, work, working, effort, exertion, operation
    act, take steps, take measures, take the initiative, move, make a move, react, do something
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    1. 1.1 The way in which something such as a chemical has an effect or influence.
      ‘the seeds require the catalytic action of water to release hotness’
      • ‘The precise mechanism of the biological actions of this plant is not fully understood.’
      • ‘That very specificity of chemical action is often a highly prized medicinal property.’
      • ‘Syrup alone may act as a demulcent and provide antitussive action without side effects.’
      • ‘The tetrodo-toxin produced has a selective blocking effect on nerve action potentials.’
      • ‘The Hox genes exert this influence by their action on the genes controlling the development of these structures.’
      • ‘When all the finish is removed, apply a neutralizer to stop the chemical action.’
      • ‘This effect could be the consequence of the anti-proliferative action of glucocorticoids.’
      • ‘Therefore the area of the roadway in question had been subject to the detrimental effects of frost action.’
      • ‘Onset of action is rapid and side effects include local irritation and unpleasant taste.’
      • ‘Problems included unspecified dosages, unclear information about drug action, and side effects of drugs.’
      • ‘I think the chemical action of light is to be regarded in this way.’
      • ‘For outdoor metal sculpture waxing at least once a year is essential to protect the metal from chemical action.’
      • ‘Considering the different mechanisms of the action of the two drugs, different protective effects are suggested.’
      • ‘Prevent major spills which can form a hard glaze and destroy the chemical oxidizing action.’
      effect, influence, power, working, work
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    2. 1.2 The events represented in a story or play.
      ‘the action is set in the country’
      • ‘The action of the story divides between this rural backdrop and Helsinki, to which Eeva eventually flees.’
      • ‘Yes the story and action is horrific at times but Ray and Kathy put in such excellent performances.’
      • ‘This film is closely inspired by and links to the story, characters and action of Driver 3.’
      • ‘There isn't actually a lot of dramatic action happening - much of the story revolves around the psychology.’
      • ‘While the action sometimes moved a little too slowly, there were plenty of funny scenes to keep things bubbling along.’
      • ‘Time. Used to define the limits of the story and around which action is organized.’
      • ‘An ability to penetrate the superficialities of the story and action to see the moral truths expressed therein.’
      • ‘As the action moves from Königsberg to Cambridge, such ironies build and become more acute.’
      • ‘Yet, compared to Deus Ex, it seems to have far less action and far more story.’
      • ‘Ralph the Heir was written in spring and summer 1869 - the same period that the novel's action is set.’
      • ‘It is set about two hundred years ago, at the time of the Napoleonic wars; the action takes place mostly in England.’
      • ‘Jackson is back for the sequel, playing the tough Security Agency head, and this time the action is set in Washington DC.’
    3. 1.3informal Exciting or notable activity.
      ‘people in the media want to be where the action is’
      ‘the nonstop action of mountain biking’
      • ‘Well chapter 7 is done, and with it the first real action in the story so far, from my point of view at least.’
      • ‘The pair will present a brand new weekend show covering all the latest sporting action from across the globe.’
      • ‘The second half was brimful of exciting action, even if the scoring returns were nothing to crow about.’
      • ‘It will be in place on match-days so that fans can catch up on the latest Sunday sporting action before and after the Knights home matches.’
      • ‘Excitement, glamour, exposure, top sporting action, cash by the barrow-load.’
      • ‘The first sporting action will be at Hampden Park where the football tournament will kick off.’
      • ‘So probably not much exciting, government-toppling action for me sadly.’
      • ‘Thankfully, that proved to be unfounded and we can continue to savour the prospect of some exciting action.’
      • ‘On the eve of his 100th birthday, Gaston suffered a stroke, but it didn't stop his drive to be ‘to be where the action’ was where the action was.’
      • ‘So a CEO has to spend time where the action is, or you're not going to get the true picture.’
      • ‘My only criticism is that perhaps there could have been a little more exciting action.’
      • ‘The film is funny and exciting, with non-stop action and set pieces.’
      • ‘Things got off to a slow start but by mid afternoon there was non stop action.’
      • ‘Five games on each day of the carnival means that there is non-stop action throughout the weekend.’
      • ‘It was a complete jump away from slow-moving stories to one containing action and excitement.’
      • ‘On some days it was difficult for visitors to know which way to look because there was just so much exciting wildlife action going on around them.’
      • ‘It also helped that I play a lot of video games in a similar effort to infuse my life with nonstop action.’
      • ‘Hollywood is hot, but this is where the action is and sometimes it is fun to be where the action is.’
      • ‘At one level, the movie is about science fiction, kung fu, firearms and non-stop action.’
      • ‘Exciting racing action throughout the weekend in the Porsche Carrera Cup Asia.’
      excitement, activity, bustle
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    4. 1.4as exclamation Used by a movie director as a command to begin.
      ‘lights, camera, action’
      • ‘Once he has his quarry in his sights, it's ready, aim, fire, lights, camera, action for this freedom-loving documentarian.’
      • ‘Jayson pointed the camera, Eric called ‘Action’ and Chris ran with an expression of terror on his face.’
      • ‘I had to make a living and I wanted to get behind a camera and shout ‘action’.’
      • ‘Everyone went into their places, and then Stephen called out, ‘Lights, camera, action!’’
  • 2A thing done; an act.

    ‘she frequently questioned his actions’
    ‘I would not be responsible for my actions if I saw him’
    • ‘The book is a sustained diatribe questioning Churchill's actions from the early 1930s through 1941.’
    • ‘Increasingly dog-tired and conflicted, his actions often seem those of a guilty man.’
    • ‘It is not your responsibility to control their actions and behavior.’
    • ‘There comes a point where you have to take responsibility for your own actions.’
    • ‘A nurse has told a jury she did not feel able to question the actions of a colleague who mistakenly gave a toddler an incorrect injection.’
    • ‘It's all well and good to perform these actions in response to the alarm clock if that's what happens every day.’
    • ‘The wider issue is the question of the state's behaviour and whether its actions were responsible.’
    • ‘The legislation will raise further questions in relation to actions open to an employer if a drug test proves positive, he said.’
    • ‘The scene requires viewers to question the actions and reactions of characters in a highly complex situation.’
    • ‘But there is also a perceived need on the part of governments to build up a momentum in public opinion both to justify its actions and bury awkward questions.’
    • ‘When will she take responsibility for her own actions?’
    • ‘Our group largely agreed but added that the police response to our actions would play a decisive role in how far things would escalate.’
    • ‘You alone are responsible for your own actions and behavior in life.’
    • ‘The consumer is king and it is the consumer who must accept a little more responsibility for the actions of global companies that are only reacting to our whims.’
    • ‘Notwithstanding his off-field actions, no one questions Carey's commitment to the concept of team.’
    • ‘However, the actions of corporations do have effects on the environment, society, and culture, etc.’
    • ‘Bacon accepts no responsibility for your drunken actions if this is attempted!’
    • ‘They knew that complaining about her actions could raise questions about their conduct and did it anyway.’
    • ‘Our country was founded in response to the actions of an over-reaching, hegemonic empire.’
    • ‘Welcome to the real world people, a world of personal responsibility where actions can generate reactions.’
    deed, act, activity, move, gesture, undertaking, exploit, manoeuvre, achievement, accomplishment, venture, enterprise, endeavour, effort, exertion
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    1. 2.1 A gesture or movement.
      ‘his actions emphasized his words’
      • ‘But their movement and actions are depicted with expressiveness and drama.’
      • ‘They learn that gestures and actions are a form of communication and begin to say a few ‘real’ words.’
      • ‘They do not perform actions, and their movements and modifications are not caused by motives, for the simple reason that they have no minds with which to perceive.’
      • ‘Rue fumed silently as he hummed contentedly and she watched him closely, studying his movements and actions.’
      • ‘What is meant by movement is specific actions of the weapon and body.’
      • ‘His movements contradicted the others' actions, his steps were graceful and quiet like that of a doe.’
      • ‘Simple actions and words are put at a premium when they aren't used to buoy a Message of Personal and Social Importance.’
      • ‘No words, just clean efficient movement and actions.’
      • ‘It's important to express our love through words and actions, kissing and hugging our children often.’
      • ‘How was it possible for someone as dumb and arrogant as Heath to make me blush with a simple action or word?’
      • ‘He was slightly taken back by her action yet returned the gesture, content to have her small frame in his arms.’
      • ‘The darkness of winter slows the city's heartbeat, making our every action or movement an effort.’
      • ‘He doesn't tend to speak, rather communicate in actions and gestures.’
      • ‘The actors, in their movements and actions, too remind one of theatrical expressions that are wholly Malayali in origin.’
      • ‘Her actions and movements sluggish and purposefully so, she has a bad feeling.’
      • ‘Movement and actions were scripted superbly, which is immediately evident when engaged for the first time in battle.’
      • ‘For many years it has been known that rock failure is complex, and results from the many stresses arising from the combined movements and actions of the tooth of a rock bit.’
      • ‘Some levels will have you performing the same movements and actions for ten minutes only to get you to a room with no purpose.’
      • ‘This workshop was the first phase of a training programme in which the kids learnt how to create expressions, actions and movements of characters.’
      • ‘Christopher also bent down to the parcel, concealing his and her actions with a turned back and diminished movements.’
  • 3A manner or style of doing something, typically the way in which a mechanism works or a person moves.

    ‘the weapon has speed and smooth action’
    ‘a high paddle action in canoeing’
    • ‘An anti-runway warhead which is equipped with a delayed action fuse has the capability of penetrating reinforced concrete runways to a depth of nearly 0.5m.’
    • ‘One of the things that gives the gun such a smooth action is the fact that the action bar and magazine tube move together.’
    • ‘The heart's pumping action pushes the blood around the body through the arteries.’
    • ‘The tray slides along the rails in a very smooth action, and is held in place with four thumbscrews.’
    • ‘In 1855 he entered Nicaragua with a small band of mercenaries armed with a new type of quick-action rifle.’
    1. 3.1 The mechanism that makes a machine or instrument work.
      ‘a piano with an escapement action’
      • ‘Most bolt actions will fit the cartridge without bolt modification and bullets up to .35 caliber can be fitted into some variation of the case.’
      • ‘His actions are machined from pre heat-treated 4140 bar stock using all carbide tooling.’
      • ‘He moved the slide action back and forth, checking that the movement was smooth enough to meet his satisfaction.’
      machinery, workings, works, movement, motion, gear, gears, wheels, components, motor, engine, power source
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  • 4Armed conflict.

    ‘servicemen listed as missing in action during the war’
    • ‘Military action is but a single prong of a much larger and broader effort to halt the threat of terrorism.’
    • ‘Several yeomen are known to have volunteered for service at Waterloo, but no formed units saw action until the Second Boer War.’
    • ‘Wayne's body has never been found, he is listed as missing in action, and presumed to be dead.’
    • ‘A former soldier who was in the thick of the action during the War told how he had met his match - in York.’
    • ‘Casualties totaled 77,000 men, which included 8,000 killed in action, 48,000 wounded in action, and 21,000 as prisoners of war or missing in action.’
    • ‘In each case, only outside military action eventually ended Genocide.’
    • ‘Most National Guard and Reservists sign up thinking they'll never see action, let alone deployment overseas.’
    • ‘He saw early action in North Africa, where he was awarded a Military Cross and bar.’
    • ‘As the news of their son's bravery came in, his parents didn't seem surprised that he had been in the thick of the action on the outskirts of the city.’
    • ‘Those killed in military action are represented as inflicting their own deaths.’
    • ‘His father, a gifted poet who worked in a bank, was killed in action in France in 1917.’
    • ‘He was wounded in action in Italy in November 1944.’
    • ‘Military action, especially a Nato assault, must be the option of last resort.’
    • ‘Nevertheless, members of this camp believe that the onset of military action might give the market a lift.’
    • ‘Cope was one of more than 8,000 Americans missing in action during the Korean War.’
    fighting, hostilities, battle, conflict, armed conflict, combat, warfare, war, bloodshed
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    1. 4.1 A military engagement.
      ‘a rearguard action’
      • ‘The combined arms battle called for concerted actions by infantry and artillery later joined by tanks and aviation.’
      • ‘He could have engaged in military actions short of an outright invasion.’
      • ‘This meant that they were part-time warriors and that spoils of war played a major role in military actions.’
      • ‘For a long time the concept of combat was synonymous to the concept of military actions.’
      • ‘One was to engage in guerilla actions and wear the enemy down.’
      • ‘‘This is a disgrace to all those who have legitimately received injuries or died in the combat actions since the first day of the war,’ Robinson said.’
      • ‘But recent weeks have seen a resurgence of armed actions by government opponents.’
      • ‘Further, subsequent military actions may depend on the effectiveness of a non-lethal attack.’
      • ‘Hawks hurriedly flew off to protect Paris but Paris was soon occupied and the Hawk pilots attempted to fight a rearguard action as they retreated from one base to another.’
      • ‘However, other soldiers, sailors, airmen, and Marines die in combat actions, too.’
      • ‘Our purpose was to study this great battle to better inform military actions in the future.’
      • ‘In Africa there have been unilateral military actions by states to overthrow despotic governments in neighbouring states.’
      • ‘The murkiness and chaos that attend armed conflict mean military actions are hardly immune to mistake.’
      • ‘He also lists the numerous combat actions in which the United States became involved after the fall of the Soviet Union.’
      • ‘Some of our adversaries are not bound by the laws we value and which regulate U.S. military actions.’
      • ‘It was the beginning of decades of military actions until the wars of independence ended in 1825.’
      • ‘We had been fighting a rearguard action across France, and we were 30 miles outside Dunkirk when the evacuation began on May 26th.’
      • ‘They sought to wear down the adversary through harassing actions and protracted conflict.’
      • ‘Third, normally blockade takes the form of systematic naval military actions.’
      • ‘The doctrine of ‘preemptive’ war will remain in force, and will be used to justify further military actions.’
      fighting, hostilities, battle, conflict, armed conflict, combat, warfare, war, bloodshed
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  • 5A legal process; a lawsuit.

    ‘an action for damages’
    • ‘If he fails to do so, he is held liable, whereas in an action for negligence the legal burden in most cases remains throughout on the plaintiff.’
    • ‘Judicial Watch has filed 92 lawsuits and legal actions against government officials.’
    • ‘The Claimant would lose his action against the primary tort feasor and must look to a claim against his solicitors.’
    • ‘If a writ in a Queen's Bench action is not issued within the statutory time limit the action cannot proceed.’
    • ‘He will remain as a defendant and the action will proceed against him and the other three defendants.’
    • ‘Would the law of New Zealand that takes away rights of common law actions for personal injuries and puts people on some kind of pension scheme apply?’
    • ‘Academic commentators have discussed various possibilities for legal actions, both of a criminal and civil nature.’
    • ‘It must be stressed that it is not for the court to assign a legal classification to the actions brought by the plaintiffs before the national court.’
    • ‘The ability to make comparisons with damages awarded for non-pecuniary losses in personal injury actions would have a salutary effect on libel juries.’
    • ‘The company says it has a strong case and intends to fight the action.’
    • ‘The first chance event is whether the plaintiff decides to bring an action for common law damages.’
    • ‘The litigation was an action in the District Court, your Honour, in a commercial matter.’
    • ‘After his accident in the spring of 1988, Kenneth sued for damages in a civil action.’
    • ‘As with other questions in this chapter it also covers a number of the judicial actions in the Community legal order.’
    • ‘That case was not concerned with public law but was a civil action for damages.’
    • ‘These costs can be recovered in a variety of ways: through fines, charges, or civil actions for damages.’
    • ‘The claimant brought an action for wrongful arrest and false imprisonment.’
    • ‘There's also a limit on how long after a wrongful act a civil action can be commenced.’
    • ‘Here, the contractor was the plaintiff and the owners were the defendants in a lien action.’
    • ‘The plaintiffs commenced an action in private law for recovery of the money due.’
    lawsuit, legal action, suit, suit at law, case, cause, prosecution, litigation, legal dispute, legal contest
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Phrases

  • go into action

    • Start work or activity.

      • ‘Elliot went into action after local radio station Z - 99 announced the contest, which awarded a pair of seats to the show to the collector of the most grasshoppers in two days.’
      • ‘Armed police went into action in the town centre on Saturday night after a youth was spotted with a gun in New Road.’
      • ‘The eight-strong police team went into action at 10 am and five people were arrested at the scene on suspicion of possessing drugs with intent to supply and were later released on bail.’
      • ‘There is a lot of people that dislike the federal government, but, he just went into action beyond anyone's wildest nightmares.’
      • ‘It's the second time the hotel's taskforce has gone into action in response to the growing disquiet over the city's increasingly grotty appearance.’
      • ‘As a curious crowd gathered at the entrance to Central Park at Fifth Avenue and 60th Street, a team of riggers, steelworkers and Japanese art world figures went into action.’
      • ‘Workers in an adjoining room were ordered to leave while the firefighters went into action.’
      • ‘Irene and Dave went into action to bring the public in.’
      • ‘As the home captain lay unconscious on the ground and the official was flat out on the touchline, spectators went into action.’
      • ‘What they're all referring to is the fact one American serviceman made a complaint in January this year, and the Pentagon's investigative machinery went into action.’
      • ‘Grandad Danny, 39, went into action after daughter-in-law Charlotte went into labour in the early hours of Monday morning at his home in Boreham.’
      • ‘We talked for a while then moved into the living room and I went into action.’
      • ‘They rob parked cars and have studied the habits of their targets before going into action.’
      • ‘The corporation stands ready to go into action and assist residents, if that becomes necessary,’ he promised.’
      • ‘By the time a helicopter lifts off, a team of experts has already gone into action - both in the air and on the ground.’
      • ‘The emergency services have a plan in place to deal with such accidents, and that has gone into action today.’
      • ‘Teresa went into action, amassing all the information she could, while Terence telephoned specialists all over the world for advice.’
      • ‘As we eat, a nearby market closes up and the local street-sweeping team goes into action as though they are finishing up for the Glasgow Fair.’
      • ‘Emergency services were on standby throughout the night on Friday and went into action at dawn on Saturday to evacuate six properties at Mill Lane, Tempsford.’
      • ‘‘We all knew as the meeting was going on that British forces were going into action,’ the Prime Minister's spokesman explained.’
  • in action

    • Engaged in a certain activity; in operation.

      • ‘Seeing the dancers and musicians in action there last weekend was a revelation.’
      • ‘Yet it is another horse who was in action at Aintree last week who threatens to take centre stage on Saturday.’
      • ‘Parliament has voted and we all know that when parliament votes that is democracy in action isn't it?’
      • ‘It's pretty hard to say who starts as favourite as we have not seen Team New Zealand in action yet.’
      • ‘So it was a relief to finally see him back in action again last night and he happily reported no after effects.’
      • ‘Both he and Grant were in action in a sprint relay race where the British B-team beat the A squad.’
      • ‘I explained to the people who didn't like me that this was democracy in action.’
      • ‘Wartime Britain was supposed to be the epitome of socialist planning in action.’
      • ‘David has another five weeks to get through and then he expects to be back in action.’
      • ‘To bring a case to court, an officer would have had to have witnessed vandals in action, he said.’
      • ‘I wasn't even allowed to take a closer look, let alone photograph the machine in action.’
      • ‘Teachers from Italy and Finland have been in town all week to see Grange Junior School in action.’
      • ‘Perhaps the single most important factor, however, is seeing it in action first.’
      • ‘Robert Sangster brought him over to Europe to give us all a chance to have a look at him in action.’
      • ‘Cheesy some of it may be, but there's a genuine thrill to be had from seeing this pampered pop icon in action.’
      • ‘An upset stomach stopped him from training on Tuesday and Wednesday but he is back in action now.’
      • ‘No games were played during the summer, when the county teams were in action.’
      • ‘A visitor centre was also added to the design, to provide a vantage point to view the wheel in action.’
      • ‘A lot of our own senior players could do with going to watch this young man in action.’
      • ‘I can remember as a child going to the old town park hoping to find one of the swings in action.’
      functioning, working, running, up and running, operative, in use, going
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  • man of action

    • A man whose life is characterized by physical activity or deeds rather than by words or intellectual matters.

      • ‘He has proved himself to be a man of action not just words.’
      • ‘Forgive me, fellow Parisians, I am a man of action not words.’
      • ‘That earned him opprobrium in the council chamber but on the streets cemented his reputation as a man of action.’
      • ‘His comedy timing is impeccable and he was equally at home as a man of action or a driven intellectual of thoughts, dreams and desires.’
      • ‘Peck's craggy good looks, grace and measured speech contributed to his screen image as the decent, courageous man of action.’
      • ‘So when we speak of intellectuals or men of action, it is important to bear in mind that such distinctions are matters of degree, of mere tendencies, not absolutes.’
      • ‘Superman, the man of Steel, is a man of action, a man who although he is not American fights the great American fight.’
      • ‘Lawrence's roles as man of action, poet, neurotic, and leader of men fascinated friends and biographers and the public for years.’
      • ‘He emerges with the most credit as a man of action, honour and compassion.’
      • ‘Although a man of action and a skilled administrator rather than an intellectual, he enjoyed the company of scholars and converted to Protestantism.’
      • ‘The 51-year-old entrepreneur is a man of action, not words.’
      • ‘Groomed by his father Nicholas I to head the navy, he had developed into a perceptive intellectual who at the same time was a man of action.’
      • ‘Unlike France, Britain has preferred men of action, pragmatists, doers rather than thinkers.’
      • ‘He is a liberation theologist, a man of action who gets on with it rather than talking about it.’
      • ‘Lame from birth, he spent his life attempting to become a man of action.’
      • ‘Both were men of action who found themselves in the right place at the right time because, in 1910, Mexico was a country which could have been created specifically for revolutionary change.’
      • ‘She loved her father, she wrote, ‘when he's a revolutionary… a man of ideas, a man of action, a man who sticks steadfastly to his views and won't trade them for anything in the world’.’
      • ‘The Romans, on the other hand, were doers, they were men of action.’
      • ‘A most affable man, his ready smile is always to the fore but underneath all that charm is a man of action who speaks by deeds as well as words.’
      • ‘He's a spiritual man, but he's a man of action, too.’
      worker, organizer, activist, man of action, achiever, high achiever, succeeder, hustler, entrepreneur
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  • out of action

    • Temporarily unable to engage in a certain activity; not working.

      ‘a heart attack put him out of action’
      ‘the ship was out of action for 16 days’
      • ‘It put one of the runways out of action for 15 minutes, disrupting incoming and departing flights.’
      • ‘The 31-year-old is currently out of action with a broken arm but will be back in a month's time.’
      • ‘A subsequent operation kept him out of action for four months and even he came back too soon.’
      • ‘She estimates the shop will be out of action for several weeks while repairs are carried out and replacement stock is ordered.’
      • ‘Traffic lights were temporarily out of action, although there were no reports of accidents.’
      • ‘Pastor Roe said that the toilets had been out of action since February.’
      • ‘And why was a security camera monitoring the prison yard mysteriously out of action?’
      • ‘Anyway, with my arm more or less out of action, and the pain, lack of sleep, etc, I've not been to work yet this week.’
      • ‘CAN I apologise for the fact that my e-mail has been out of action for the past few weeks due to a technical hitch.’
      • ‘Questions have to be asked, including why the CCTV cameras on the ward were out of action.’
      • ‘Malt attacked from the restart and, with Cooke temporarily out of action, Will Barber booted a penalty.’
      • ‘They managed to release the lift, but it has since been out of action.’
      • ‘He signed for them at the start of the season but has been out of action since sustaining a broken leg in a pre-season friendly.’
      • ‘The electricity failure kept the phones and most of the lighting out of action for more than three hours.’
      • ‘Her problems were made worse by the fact that the lift was temporarily out of action.’
      • ‘He was out of action for a year and was eventually forced to retire.’
      • ‘Gashes and knocks that would put a professional footballer out of action for weeks tend to be shrugged off.’
      • ‘He was out of action for six months, although the initial diagnosis was for much longer, and on crutches for two.’
      • ‘The centre also paid for engineering work on the ship's main generator which was out of action.’
      • ‘He lives on the top floor and said one lift has been out of action for more than eight weeks, and the other takes users to the wrong floor.’
      not working, not in working order, not functioning, broken, broken-down, out of order, out of service, out of commission, acting up, unserviceable, faulty, defective, non-functional, in disrepair
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  • a piece (or slice) of the action

    • 1informal A share in the excitement of something.

      share, portion, bit, cut, quota, percentage
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      1. 1.1US A share in the profits accruing from something.
  • put into action

    • Put into effect; carry out.

      • ‘The County Emergency Service Plan was put into action as fire brigades and ambulance crews arrived at the scene’
      • ‘A major new coast protection plan for Clacton has been drawn up, after two years of research, and will cost £34 million to put into action.’
      • ‘As I mentioned in Friday's blog entry, Plan B was put into action.’
      • ‘‘We're alarmed that what was threatened was put into action,’ Mr Dale said.’
      • ‘Richards said an up-do-date traffic survey needs to be carried out before any plans are put into action.’
      • ‘A bid to get a repair operation under way was put into action.’
      • ‘Chamber spokesman Murray Willock, who has been involved with the concept from day one, questioned why the proposal had not been put into action by police.’
      • ‘Sadie can come to a company and organise a ‘brainstorming meetings’ where ideas are discussed, up dated and put into action.’
      • ‘Pratyabhijna says with emphasis that knowledge put into action or practice is really meaningful.’
      • ‘The speed restrictions will be put into action throughout the village centre after no objections were received to the order.’
      • ‘We're a long way from seeing these cuts put into action, but I'm cautiously optimistic.’
      • ‘Problem solving tactics were put into action (all a bit much at 7.43 am).’
      • ‘However there were a few changes and improvements suggested for the various stalls and these will be put into action at the next sale’
      • ‘After two years of successful human and cattle trials on the heart-rate monitor, it is now being developed by a firm who say that it could be put into action as early as next year.’
      • ‘And what does a report like that put into action, in terms of an investigation?’
      • ‘The recovery plan to be put into action by the new team addresses issues raised in a damning Corporate Governance Inspection report last summer.’
      • ‘I hope this ID card idea will be put into action in the near future.’
      • ‘It is about love and compassion put into action - not oppression.’
      • ‘The effective dissolution of the group, which has been observing a ceasefire since 1996, may be announced in a few weeks, though it could take six months to put into action.’
      • ‘Five Government reports have been drawn up into epilepsy since 1953 but campaigners claim none has been put into action.’
      execute, apply, put into action, put into effect, put into practice, carry out, carry through, perform, enact, administer
      View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: via Old French from Latin actio(n-), from agere ‘do, act’.

Pronunciation

action

/ˈakSH(ə)n//ˈækʃ(ə)n/