Definition of accusative in English:



  • Relating to or denoting a case of nouns, pronouns, and adjectives that expresses the object of an action or the goal of motion.

    • ‘It is the Gaulish cognate of Latin rex, whose stem is/reg /, as we see in forms such as the accusative singular regem and the nominative plural reges.’
    • ‘But if lindwig is an accusative object of the verb flugon, laora refers to the Hebrews: ‘the survivors fled the shield-army of the hostile ones.’’
    • ‘An m or n might be represented by a macron above a preceding vowel (poet for poetam, the accusative form of Latin poeta, poet) Omitted letters might be indicated by a suspension sign: the APOSTROPHE in M'ton, short for Merton.’
    • ‘This claims that ‘syllabus’ originally occurred as a misprint of a Greek accusative plural in a fifteenth century edition of Cicero.’
    • ‘On both occasions he places the accusative pronoun between the subject and the verb, advancing the object from its natural position and juxtaposing it with the subject.’
    • ‘So free-standing pronouns are accusative, even when they're interpreted as subjects: Who did that?’
    • ‘In ordinary English this is a function that goes with accusative case on a pronoun: if you knock on my door and I call out Who is it?’
    • ‘The Greek preposition had several meanings, depending on whether it governed the accusative, genitive, or dative case.’
    • ‘How idiomatic the infinitive / accusative construction was, however, is a matter of some debate.’
    • ‘The accusative has thus two forms: the definite (with accusative ending) and the indefinite (the same as the nominative).’
    • ‘One of the leading ideas of the analysis is that the structural accusative position has wide scope with respect to the agent relation expressed by the head of the voice phrase.’
    • ‘They often appear without the final nominative ‘s’, as if they had been heard in conversation only in their accusative form, although in their contexts in the book they do not always serve as direct objects.’
    • ‘So long as the payoff phrase is not actually a subject (even though it's interpreted as the subject), the basic case rule would predict accusative case.’
    • ‘However, when studying German I was taught some grammar: so I thus learned the difference between a past tense and a past participle, and the difference between the nominative and the accusative cases.’
    • ‘The Hebrew Christian scholar, Dr Arnold G. Fruchtenbaum, supports this interpretation by pointing out that the word YHWH is preceded by the untranslated accusative particle et, which marks the object of the verb, in this case ‘gotten’.’


  • 1A word in the accusative case.

    • ‘For instance, Q. might choose to suggest we refer to qim and to qer posts using the nominative qe, the accusative qim and the genitive qer.’
    • ‘Gildersleeve and Lodge also point out that the Romans sometimes took the accusative of the Greek word to be the stem.’
    • ‘Recall the fictional judge objecting to splitting in court, in one of the Rumpole stories; he used an accusative in a gerund object, even for a pronoun,’
    • ‘These would include the nominative (for the subject of a sentence), the accusative (for its object) and the genitive (to indicate possession).’
    • ‘Nouns have no gender & end in o; the plural terminates in oj (pronounced oy) & the accusative, on (plural ojn).’
    • ‘I think I shall express the accusative by a prefix!’
    • ‘So in fact the accusative in the cartoon is not grammatical in Standard English as normally used.’
    • ‘Followed by accusative and infinitive (anqrwpouß einai).’
    1. 1.1The accusative case.
      • ‘Or putting the adjectives in the genitive case, instead of the accusative, as in ‘I will take the chalice of salvation’?’
      • ‘The nominal system distinguishes five cases: nominative, genitive, dative, accusative, and ablative; the genitive and dative endings are always the same.’
      • ‘As students of the language may recall, German has four cases - nominative, genitive, dative, and accusative - which see words change in order to explain their relationship to each other.’
      • ‘Classical Mongolian had seven cases, all clearly distinguished, in contrast to Latin: nominative, accusative, dative, genitive, ablative, instrumental, and comitative.’
      • ‘Why do some verbs take the genitive, not the accusative?’


Late Middle English: from Latin casus) accusativus, literally relating to an accusation or (legal) case translating Greek ( (ptōsis) aitiatikē (the case) showing cause.