Definition of accusation in English:

accusation

noun

  • 1A charge or claim that someone has done something illegal or wrong.

    ‘accusations of bribery’
    • ‘Zealously denying the accusations, Richard waxed eloquent in his own defense.’
    • ‘After all, accusations of bias usually say more about the accuser than the accused.’
    • ‘Just five days later, however, he crashed down to earth amid accusations of bribery.’
    • ‘We are individuals as well as social beings, and open to accusations of selfishness and hypocrisy.’
    • ‘I'm sick of the silent accusations that I'm not trying hard enough to get a job.’
    • ‘I do think these things can be discussed and criticised without accusations of elitism coming up.’
    • ‘To avoid accusations that he didn't live in the electorate, he rented a place there.’
    • ‘It is these kinds of charges and accusations that make people laugh at the military.’
    • ‘Shows were cancelled and accusations flew between members of the band as to who was to blame.’
    • ‘The move has provoked accusations that Executive ministers are acting to silence a vocal critic.’
    • ‘Defeat on the pitch can lead, and has led, to accusations not only of bribery but cowardice and even treason.’
    • ‘More than four years on not one iota of evidence in support of the accusations has been provided.’
    • ‘Countering accusations of dullness, the insurer's job often borders on the surreal.’
    • ‘Some were more inventive in the means they took to make accusations of sexual misconduct.’
    • ‘The unit was intended to review the system of public appointments to avoid accusations of political bias.’
    • ‘Sensitive to accusations of cronyism, he also wanted a non-political appointment.’
    • ‘Once again accusations are flying about the lack of consultation over health services.’
    • ‘Added to this are accusations that he failed to live up to his promise that the elections would be democratic and fair.’
    • ‘As if to counter the accusations of snootiness, not every selection is wilfully obscure.’
    • ‘Is this what was meant by the scurrilous accusations about his expenses?’
    allegation, charge, claim, assertion, asseveration, attribution, incrimination, imputation, denouncement, indictment, arraignment, citation, inculpation, blame, condemnation, criticism, complaint
    suit, lawsuit
    plaint
    impeachment, bill of indictment
    beef
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The action or process of accusing someone.
      ‘there was accusation in Brian's voice’
      • ‘But along with sin, there came lust, fear, pride, accusation, betrayal, and guilt.’
      • ‘The muzzle of the gun just stared Czerell in the face like an unblinking eye of accusation.’
      • ‘Suddenly the play turns from a study of adolescent accusation into one about the problems of living with a gay husband.’
      • ‘Everyday when she looked out her window she was filled with an intense feeling of accusation.’
      • ‘He creeps toward me low to the ground, with a whiny growl of misery and accusation.’
      • ‘It is no exaggeration to say the town was being torn apart by suspicion, rumour and accusation during my visit there in November.’
      • ‘Museum officials led the cry of accusation, and their stories soon appeared in the media.’
      • ‘Such practices of accusation and defense have an important place in morality and law.’
      • ‘She took a long breath and regarded me with a look that was rife with accusation.’
      • ‘We put the US on notice that we expect full proof, that we will not tolerate accusation by innuendo or slur.’
      • ‘He has a long history of accusation of unethical acts from suborning perjury to driving under the influence of marijuana.’
      • ‘The Stegner program was designed to avoid any accusation that a writing degree was a soft option.’
      • ‘The blonde with tears running down her cheeks starts crying harder but her blue eyes have a hint of accusation in them.’
      • ‘Every question Crosse asked himself left him facing a spear of accusation.’
      • ‘She had looked so cute with her disheveled dark curls and accusation in her gaze as she sat on her rump on the floor.’
      • ‘You could not conceivably get more resentment and accusation than is documented there.’
      • ‘Once at the door, the memories halted and the silence accosted her with a tone of accusation.’
      • ‘There was accusation in her voice, and he felt his heart go heavy at it.’
      • ‘A generation later, he is driven to return to the scene, craving discovery and even accusation.’
      • ‘A blistering run from Greene, and one provoking no accusation of drug cheating, might still save the day.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French, from Latin accusatio(n-), from accusare call to account (see accuse).

Pronunciation:

accusation

/ˌakyəˈzāSH(ə)n/