Definition of accordion in English:

accordion

noun

  • 1A portable musical instrument with metal reeds blown by bellows, played by means of keys and buttons.

    [as modifier] ‘an accordion player’
    • ‘Paintings and precious ornaments line the walls, pictures painted by his parents: a pride of lions, a stormy ocean scene, swords, a family bible, two accordions and a cello.’
    • ‘Stacked with pop aplenty, this album is fun and flighty, filled with accordions, trumpets, guitar, a sitar (sitars are cool!) and even a few MTV Unplugged performances.’
    • ‘Over in the Marist Hall that evening a recital will take place at 8pm and the instruments involved are accordions, concertina and guitars and traditional singing.’
    • ‘I'm all sampling strings and accordions, almost to where it brings up visions of a pastoral French landscape.’
    • ‘We also want to bring in piano accordions into the band which at the moment is predominantly made up of button accordions.’
    • ‘A peat fire burns all day and locals sometimes turn up with their bagpipes, accordions or mouth organs!’
    • ‘Although the band started out playing dishpans, accordions, and glockenspiel, they eventually settled on a more traditional sound.’
    • ‘Next Thursday, the Sultans of Squeeze come to town with their collection of melodions, accordions and concertinas to perform music of all genres, from folk, to waltzes, to blues to rock ‘n’ roll.’
    • ‘Saxophones, accordions, guitars, clarinets, double-bass, and percussion blend with an extensive electronic array of clicks, hiss, static, and sampled voices.’
    • ‘This is usually very enjoyable with many good singers bringing along their guitars and accordions for a good session.’
    • ‘All of these involved musical accompaniment, with fiddles, harmonicas, and later accordions.’
    • ‘By mixing unashamed rock with Mexican music and throwing in accordions and honking saxophones, Los Lobos create a sound that endures.’
    • ‘The most impressive moment is the vaudeville-esque outro, fleshed out with seemingly decaying accordions.’
    • ‘On some accordions separate banks of reeds with a variety of timbres may be brought into play by pressing tabs set above the manuals.’
    • ‘Watching the world go by as you sit on a French-style ‘terrace’, sipping your café au lait, under an endless blue sky - you can almost hear the sound of the accordions playing.’
    • ‘Beautiful harmonies, including an ending Latin prayer, are bathed in a delicate blanket of accordions and Spanish guitars.’
    • ‘MEXICAN FOLK music blares from a boom box, the sounds of accordions filtering up the stairs.’
    • ‘Electric guitars, souped up accordions and samples of bagpipe music, the instruments were the only electrifying aspect of the assault to the senses.’
    • ‘In his early years he also sold a variety of articles like accordions, concertinas and mouth-organs, costume accessories and straw hat polish - anything indeed which would turn an honest penny.’
    • ‘In the past, the band's predilection for exotic instrumentation would sometimes result in stray accordions or sleigh bells getting completely buried in an amorphous mash.’
    1. 1.1[as modifier] Folding like the bellows of an accordion.
      ‘an accordion pleat’
      • ‘She was nervously folding the fabric of her shirt into accordion folds.’
      • ‘Only the prototype for accordion garage doors, which form the entire facade on the south side, can be called a luxury item.’
      • ‘To save these pieces he folded the paper accordion style, and from that came the idea of making even sized rectangles one under the other on each pleat.’
      • ‘These accordion style doors have the advantages of no tracks to trip over or keep clean.’
      • ‘Purchase a plastic accordion folder and create tabs for each of the children you babysit.’
      • ‘Use cloth napkins, fold them into accordion pleats and place them in the water glasses.’
      • ‘Cardboard strips can also be curved, folded in accordion fashion, and coiled for a wide variety of effects.’
      • ‘Fold one side one inch back and continue in an accordion fashion until you have one strip of tissue about one inch across.’
      • ‘The PV array blanket is folded in an accordion style before placement in a canister.’
      • ‘Another format of Japanese books are accordion structures with a few variations.’
      • ‘No children defying their parents and pulling things off the shelves and no scary women with accordion folders full of coupons.’
      • ‘A recent solo exhibition at Mixed Greens featured two drawings in accordion books.’
      • ‘You might even want to throw in some fancier accordion pleats or other folds to make your shapes come to life.’
      • ‘A white sporting jacket with a thick, accordion collar over a brown sweater and a white sailing shirt.’
      • ‘She demonstrates the accordion binding of Hiddenness by opening the book to stand on its own as a kind of folding canvas.’
      • ‘It looked like it was a single car that had no hood and two trunks, with an accordion design in the middle.’
      • ‘For example, to keep her papers in order, would she work best with a binder or an accordion file?’
      • ‘Repeated a few times, it has an accordion effect and adds several minutes to the journey.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: from German Akkordion, from Italian accordare to tune.

Pronunciation:

accordion

/əˈkôrdēən/