Definition of academy in US English:

academy

noun

  • 1A place of study or training in a special field.

    ‘a police academy’
    • ‘We see a class at the police academy that behaves like a bunch of high school kids.’
    • ‘In the training academy, I'll be running five miles a day.’
    • ‘Many of the youngsters graduated from tennis academies rather than high schools, and they're not the best conversationalists.’
    • ‘Members of the Homeless Power Project also have met with police recruits at the training academy and at some precincts.’
    • ‘President Bush delivered the commencement address at the Air Force academy today.’
    • ‘He went to Florida January 2, still limping badly, to focus on the NFL by working out and living at a training academy owned by the IMG agency.’
    • ‘In fact he became a police recruit, joining the force and training at an academy in North Wales.’
    • ‘He may have shunned the British academies for a training school in Barcelona, where he has honed his skills as a clay court exponent rather than a grass aficionado, but he still counts British No 1, Henman, as a role model.’
    • ‘All three graduated from the police academy at Yuba County Community College.’
    • ‘The day she graduated from high school, she signed up for the police academy.’
    • ‘During the year the academy will provide training support for the athletes including the use of biokinetics and a course in special nutrition to enhance the athletes' performances.’
    • ‘After graduation, I was accepted into the police academy's six-month training program to become an officer.’
    • ‘After I graduated from college, I entered the police academy.’
    • ‘Rookie cops graduate from the police academy anxious to collar real criminals.’
    • ‘It's not like she goes to the police academy to train and prepare herself for things like this.’
    • ‘Tony Blair has formally opened a training academy for teachers known as the Sandhurst for teachers.’
    • ‘Smithson argues that fire and police academies should offer this training.’
    • ‘The long days studying in class and endless hours of physical training at the academy paid off in ways Richard had probably never imagined.’
    • ‘The academy has vigorous training and fitness programmes.’
    • ‘The victim was a 24-year-old recent graduate of a police academy that has received support and guidance from coalition forces.’
    educational institution, training establishment, centre of learning
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    1. 1.1dated A place of study.
      • ‘More than providing vocational and academic training, the academies provided a web of valuable future contacts.’
      • ‘By 1825, 177 private academies were established, 13 of which were for girls.’
      • ‘After 1830, free settlers began to arrive and the musical public grew in numbers, establishing chamber music concerts, visits by virtuoso soloists, and private music academies.’
      • ‘A sign reads Mugen High School: The private academy for elegant young woman.’
      • ‘Entry was difficult - among the artists who failed the examinations were Rodin and Vuillard - and students often preferred the private academies.’
      • ‘They came together in a variety of salons, private academies, libraries and the like, enjoying the discreet but effective patronage of princes, ministers, and aristocrats.’
      • ‘The Dublin Society was founded in 1731 to promote Irish agriculture and manufactures, and during the 1740s absorbed a local academy to provide a training for arts and crafts.’
      • ‘She had decided that I was becoming too much like a boy and requested I to be sent off to my all girls academy to be educated and taught how to be proper.’
      • ‘Due to Coffin's influence, the Coffin School, a private academy on Nantucket reopened in 1903.’
      • ‘The seminary offered women more of a liberal education than the grade-school academies.’
      • ‘In Nicholas Nickleby, he crusaded against another institution, the so-called private academies for unwanted children.’
      • ‘The founding of elementary schools, academies, and universities was an important part of the reform movement.’
      • ‘In London, Daisy had been educated at an academy for young ladies where she gained a reputation as an extrovert.’
      educational institution, training establishment, centre of learning
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    2. 1.2Scottish, US A secondary school, typically a private one.
      ‘he had passed all his finals at Ephebus Academy’
      • ‘The top schools would be reserved for the wealthiest layers of society, who could pay to send their children to elite private schools and academies.’
      • ‘Secondary head teachers said academies should be encouraged to collaborate with neighbouring schools.’
      • ‘City academies are publicly-funded independent secondary schools, given more freedom than normal state schools to help them raise standards in disadvantaged urban areas.’
      • ‘Blacks attend the public schools; most whites attend private academies.’
      • ‘Government plans to create more specialist secondary schools and privately managed city academies were also condemned.’
      • ‘Still other White students fled to segregated private academies.’
      • ‘They insisted on calling her Chaelia and sending her to a private academy for schooling.’
      • ‘What happened to the white children who didn't transfer to private academies but stayed in the public schools after they were desegregated?’
      • ‘There were few luxuries and certainly no thought of private academies.’
      • ‘Independent schools are also coming under pressure to invest more money in facilities as the Government invests in new secondary schools and academies.’
      • ‘English is commonly taught in the public schools, and sometimes French is offered in private academies.’
      • ‘Their children attend private academies and may occasionally speak to one of the Peasantry as the latter mows the grass or cleans the house.’
      • ‘The Emmanuel Schools Foundation last month announced its interest in sponsoring a new academy to replace Northcliffe Secondary School, which is in special measures.’
      • ‘Clarendon County whites resisted integration and created private academies that exist today.’
      • ‘Unlike traditional state-funded schools, city academies benefit from private sponsorship as well as government funding.’
      • ‘He carried the habit through a number of upscale academies and prep schools, managing to get routinely expelled for poor marks and a strong anti-authoritarian streak.’
      • ‘Her father had no idea she was enrolled in a private academy.’
      • ‘For example, McConnell is resisting the idea of city academies, which use private funds and expertise, despite offers of support from Irvine Laidlaw, one of the country's richest men.’
      • ‘They were twins who had just transferred from a private academy.’
      • ‘A child of the civil rights movement, she attended integrated schools and sends her son to one of Atlanta's tony private academies.’
    3. 1.3the Academy The teaching school founded by Plato.
  • 2A society or institution of distinguished scholars and artists or scientists that aims to promote and maintain standards in its particular field.

    ‘the National Academy of Sciences’
    • ‘He refused to accept honorary degrees but he did accept honorary membership of academies and learned societies.’
    • ‘AAAS was founded in 1848, and reports some 265 affiliated societies and academies of science, serving 10 million individuals.’
    • ‘Hamilton was showered with medals and honours by the academies and learned societies of the world.’
    • ‘The Royal Society is an independent academy promoting the natural and applied sciences.’
    • ‘China has an official art scene with academies, art institutions and regular print exhibitions with awards and prices.’
    • ‘Nine years ago, he and a dozen sports medicine doctors formed the academy to promote anti-aging treatments and to learn more about the long-term effects.’
    • ‘Other new venues for elite cultural exchange could be found in literary societies, and learned academies, modelled after the French Academy in Paris.’
    • ‘The Government has established 10 academies for encouraging cultural activities.’
    • ‘He was elected an honorary member of over twenty learned societies and academies world-wide.’
    • ‘Nor was it created in the image of the great European scientific societies or academies that were dedicated to research alone.’
    • ‘He is to step down as chairman of the institution after artists at the academy called for his resignation.’
    • ‘Mayflower will now also receive additional funding from the independent scientific academy The Royal Society, freeing up Government money for other subjects.’
    • ‘Eleven companies and one individual were honored with the academy's distinguished awards.’
    • ‘He was elected to honorary membership of eighteen academies and learned societies in Europe, India, and the United States.’
    • ‘By the end of the 17th century, new societies and academies devoted to science were founded.’
    • ‘The U.S. National Academy of Sciences is a model for other societies and academies.’
    • ‘He was appointed to numerous academies and societies in Canada and abroad including Honorary Consulting Physician at three different Ontario hospitals and the Chair of Medical Research.’
    • ‘Vigorous debates, in the press, in the world of letters, and in learned societies and academies, testified to the worries of educated men that they faced a crisis that would soon be beyond control.’
    • ‘Xie is not a member of either the Chinese Academy of Sciences or Chinese Academy of Engineering, two academies for top Chinese scientists.’
    • ‘The 345-year-old Society is the national academy of science of the United Kingdom.’
    organization, establishment, institution, foundation, centre
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    1. 2.1 The community of scholars; academe.
      ‘a writing and publishing world outside the academy’
      • ‘The university used to be a system of well-patrolled borders - between disciplines, and between the academy and various outside worlds.’
      • ‘It's gratifying to see weblog postings participating in intellectual discourse within the academy as well as outside it.’
      • ‘He knew of the life that would await him outside the academy.’
      • ‘By contrast, Democratic and Republican Economists and Political Scientists are just as likely to be found inside and outside the academy.’
      • ‘This work is articulated in a way that invites - and will undoubtedly excite - a wide readership within and outside the academy.’
      • ‘For many of us both within and outside of the academy, the new century started in 1989.’
      • ‘There are signs that, outside the academy, middlebrow literary circles, and the United Nations, feminism has indeed met its Waterloo.’
      • ‘And even better, the format is equally open to people from outside the academy who want to read about the latest scholarship, blog about it, or even write it.’
      • ‘The largest issue, he finds, is that the humanities have become completely removed from the worlds outside the academy.’
      • ‘What does the left need to do to become more relevant outside the academy?’
      • ‘She is unusual in having such broad cultural interests and in deciding early on in her career to pursue those interests outside the academy in which she could clearly have excelled.’
      • ‘But outside the academy, they remained a fringe movement.’
      • ‘Outside the academy, the meaning of ‘environment’ has blurred and broadened.’
      • ‘But in the end, I believe that it does not matter whether professors are better motivated or not better motivated than those outside of the academy.’
      • ‘As he described it, succeeding in the liberal arts academy is tough enough as it is without the added burden of holding unpopular views.’
      • ‘Experiential learning is one of the most powerful and common methods by which adults continue learning outside the academy.’
      • ‘Then there is the recurring need for historians to strive to connect their scholarship to the interests of people outside of the academy.’
      • ‘Outside the academy, it is a notion that holds the promise of explaining how most readers evaluate what they read.’
      • ‘Unfortunately, we don't have in the United States a tradition of intellectual work outside the academy.’
      • ‘These philosophers broke little new ground, and the challenge to these orthodoxies came from outside the academy.’

Origin

Late Middle English (denoting the garden where Plato taught): from French académie or Latin academia, from Greek akadēmeia, from Akadēmos, the hero after whom Plato's garden was named.

Pronunciation

academy

/əˈkadəmē//əˈkædəmi/