Definition of academic in English:

academic

adjective

  • 1Relating to education and scholarship.

    ‘academic achievement’
    ‘he had no academic qualifications’
    • ‘We need to bridge the gaps of academic achievement among all student groups.’
    • ‘All parents care deeply about their children's education and academic progress.’
    • ‘His education was paid by a full academic scholarship from some charitable foundation; her education was paid by her parents.’
    • ‘Some disabilities, such as severe autism, can profoundly limit the academic achievement of students.’
    • ‘On the other hand, they could be very selective admitting only those of the highest academic qualifications and achievements.’
    • ‘They also analyzed the long-term academic achievement of these students.’
    • ‘Burrell received a 2004 Jazz Educator of the Year award from Down Beat magazine for academic achievement and excellence in jazz education.’
    • ‘Admission to higher education is by academic qualifications.’
    • ‘A second factor was the development of scientific and technical education to confer coveted academic qualifications on the captains of industry.’
    • ‘I had grown up in a middle-class Jewish milieu where intellect, distilled into academic achievement, was everything.’
    • ‘The length of time in a two-way bilingual program is positively correlated with student academic achievement.’
    • ‘All of these factors contribute significantly to their high dropout rates and poor academic achievement.’
    • ‘Even among disadvantaged students, many of these schools are working miracles in fostering a culture of academic achievement - on small budgets.’
    • ‘This was the case that upheld a Washington law that gave academic scholarships to qualified students, but forbid them from using them to study theology.’
    • ‘Sander looked at the impact of Catholic grade school education on academic achievement.’
    • ‘I chose to interview eleven Vietnamese refugee youths who received scholarships for their academic achievement.’
    • ‘But school is still only one strand of their education and academic achievement isn't everything.’
    • ‘They had been taught more purposefully, coached in exam technique and raised and educated in settings where academic achievement was valued.’
    • ‘The teachers have helped establish the school's orderly and serious atmosphere, and its culture deeply respectful of academic achievement.’
    • ‘CGF academic scholarships are awarded to full-time students pursuing a college education in Canada or abroad.’
    educational, scholastic, instructional, pedagogical
    scholarly, studious, literary, well read, intellectual, clever, erudite, learned, educated, cultured, bookish, highbrow, pedantic, donnish, cerebral, serious
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    1. 1.1 Relating to an educational or scholarly institution or environment.
      ‘students resplendent in academic dress’
      • ‘And in this scrutiny and disapproval my issues with class and otherness have resurfaced, again in relation to an academic environment.’
      • ‘In an academic environment, for example, there may be less need for an easy-to-learn system because it's the user's job to learn.’
      • ‘I did do some of this stuff when I was in school; I didn't read all of it outside the academic environment.’
      • ‘When it came to the academic environment, I was a natural.’
      • ‘This gives a total of around 113 identifiable anthropologists working in Australian academic environments.’
      • ‘The question that then emerged was, ‘How does one groove to a daggy disco mix in formal wear and long academic gown?’’
      • ‘The word communication is debated in today's academic environments.’
      • ‘Some seek extra practicum experiences outside their academic departments prior to internship in an effort to compensate for the lack of breadth in their training.’
      • ‘He always sought an academic environment and therefore moved from Llanelli to Cardiff, the site of his final appointment and where he lived out his retirement.’
      • ‘Educational leave refers to the practice of a company allowing its employees to suspend their work to study in an academic institution with the intention of earning a degree.’
      • ‘Perhaps, too, the academic environment is just too rarefied, too unrelated to a recognisable outside world, to be satirically relevant.’
      • ‘Pressures within the academic environment itself may subtly push professors toward viewing their students as would-be clones of themselves.’
      • ‘The author reviews the problems that have plagued history in the academic environment to dispel the popular belief that history is the same thing as the past.’
      • ‘This type of intervention does work in helping students meet short-term academic goals in the educational setting.’
      • ‘It also has a job bank and links to the growing number of academic institutions with educational tracks that support the meeting profession.’
      • ‘The faculty and other staff and students at both International and at Sofia University welcomed him and helped him to settle into the new academic environment.’
      • ‘It was an important milestone in my own disillusionment with what often passed for ‘liberalism’ in some academic environments.’
      • ‘For this to happen it takes longer than a few weeks of holidaying or even a few years spent studying at an academic institution.’
      • ‘Accounting historians as a whole have yet to appreciate the important contextual differences now seen in the U.S. academic environment.’
      • ‘The sex workers who come for training have to learn what research is about, what the budgets involve, how to negotiate within an unfamiliar academic environment.’
      • ‘The future of strategic studies in terms of academic organization will be tested in a number of respects.’
      • ‘It might be asked why parapsychology is studied in some academic institutions.’
      • ‘Moving away from the academic environment was a shrewd move for Stoneham, who has trebled the amount of business she used to do at Oxford University.’
      • ‘When I went back and read what is being proposed, some of the language suggests that the plan is to fund early drug discovery and development in an academic environment.’
      • ‘‘In the majority of cases, the moderators tend to come from the academic environment or the wealthier churches,’ he said.’
      • ‘In the academic environment, student retention and retention of alumni loyalty are important strategic goals.’
    2. 1.2 (of an institution or a course of study) placing a greater emphasis on reading and study than on technical or practical work.
      ‘an academic high school that prepares students for the best colleges and universities’
      • ‘The bursary received will afford the elite sports person the opportunity to compete at the highest level while pursuing a course of academic study at the Institute.’
      • ‘It's an academic course and there's lots of reading and writing.’
      • ‘Much of what Elgar as composer put into practice went well beyond what was available to him in the textbooks or what could have been derived from an institutional academic course on music.’
      • ‘Wigan and Leigh College offers an industry-led academic course in fashion technology that provides the foundation for a range of careers in the industry.’
      • ‘All bona fide masters insist upon the completion of an academic course of study.’
      • ‘The reality is that a diverse school can provide a first-class academic education.’
      • ‘But in the hothouse environment of academic science the flawed theory has been allowed to survive.’
      • ‘According to Dr. Rajan, the Centre is doing advanced research, apart from conducting usual academic courses of higher studies.’
      • ‘But then Miller began taking more traditional academic courses and found he loved being a college student.’
      • ‘Here's a short snapshot of a dynamic realm that helps to generate my weekly column for the Irish Examiner as well as keep the reading material in my academic courses relevant.’
      • ‘And it reflects the wide range of courses available at the region's universities, alongside the more traditional academic courses associated with degree courses.’
      • ‘Student farm managers report that academic integration - linking farm work directly to academic courses - can also be a challenge.’
      • ‘Without the Student Loan Scheme, university students would continue to pursue the lofty academic courses whose demise is being so sorely lamented.’
      • ‘You receive a grade on your transcript for your internship course, just as you do for your academic courses.’
      • ‘However a debate has simmered for years as to whether journalism has improved with the welter of academic courses which produce hundreds of graduates each year.’
      • ‘The emphasis on completing secondary school (high school) includes academic and religious studies.’
      • ‘The Education Secretary, Charles Clarke, has questioned public funding of purely academic courses.’
      • ‘Universities have been encouraged to provide more practical training and decrease the emphasis on academic study.’
      • ‘Flooding academic courses with under-prepared students may have had the net effect of driving the rigor out of these courses.’
      • ‘A variety of academic courses in foreign-area studies could precede or follow such summer programs.’
    3. 1.3 (of a person) interested in or excelling at scholarly pursuits and activities.
      ‘Ben is not an academic child but he tries hard’
      • ‘Lots of children are not academic but would make first-rate plumbers or electricians.’
      • ‘I lived apart from the happy, academic families.’
      • ‘He was quite academic, was a great help at home and nothing was ever too much trouble for him.’
      • ‘It is interesting to see how academic writers ‘anonymously’ describe themselves and their works.’
      • ‘This is what passes for humor in an academic family.’
      • ‘The academic reader will find the book a scholarly and intellectual tour de force.’
      • ‘Perhaps it's difficult being academic in a non-academic environment.’
      • ‘Thurschwell writes with an academic audience in mind, but this book can be enjoyed by any serious reader interested in the cultural history of the late nineteenth century.’
      • ‘The dauntingly solid volumes also offer the reader an anthology of short extracts, specific illustrations of usage and enough etymological information to satisfy the more academic reader.’
      • ‘My academic parents gave me ‘The Times’ to read at 4.’
      • ‘Probably won't go down well with my academic friends, but I felt I really wanted to be out doing things more in the real world than actually doing research.’
      • ‘You may not have all the book smarts that some people do, and I was certainly never an academic person.’
      • ‘Unlike most current academic thinkers, they believe the market is neither unpredictable nor random, that patterns lie buried in the mass of data that daily gushes forth.’
      • ‘But my stuffy academic friends each have their own store of knowledge.’
      • ‘P.S. This is an interesting read, but irritating when the academic writer makes patronising attempts to cater to an ‘ordinary’ audience.’
      • ‘In fact, if Kaplan wants, I can be his academic groupie.’
      • ‘Because Sue wasn't academic, I did begin to worry about her, but once she went to Eastbourne College to study domestic science, her life changed completely.’
      • ‘Unlike the vast majority of academic thinkers, Zizek is not worried about being ‘careless.’’
      • ‘Most of my academic friends engage in similar pursuits.’
      • ‘At the moment, we attract a very intellectual, academic audience and we want to make it a cultural centre which will welcome family groups.’
      scholarly, erudite, well educated, knowledgeable, well read, widely read, well versed, well informed, lettered, cultured, cultivated, civilized, intellectual, intelligent, clever, literary, bookish, highbrow, studious, sage, wise, sagacious, discerning, donnish, cerebral, enlightened, illuminated, sophisticated, pedantic
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    4. 1.4 (of an art form) conventional, especially in an idealized or excessively formal way.
      ‘academic painting’
      • ‘However, in style and technique the artists of the Ashcan School are now seen to have differed less from contemporary academic painting than they themselves believed.’
      • ‘‘Raphael Replaced’ is how Tinterow describes the challenging move in French art away from the academic model.’
      • ‘As a result, modernism seems to germinate - naturally and inescapably - in the damp, sweetly rotten soil of academic art.’
      • ‘In eastern Europe there is an ironic return to pandering after western Europe, as Classicism once affected the formal precepts of French academic style.’
      • ‘However, in 1904 academic painting still dominated state-sponsored salons, and a world's fair art exhibition was inherently nationalistic.’
      • ‘They eventually rejected their teachers' conventional ideas and academic art, yet spent years assiduously copying and assimilating the Old Masters.’
      • ‘Like impressionism, art nouveau was an International revolt against the traditional academic art style.’
      • ‘The search for art created beyond the reach of academic officialdom began with the discovery of Henri Rousseau by Picasso's circle in early twentieth century France.’
      • ‘In Gerome's quasi-photographic version of academic painting, tone came first.’
      • ‘The point is that if one wants to find what sets Gainsborough apart from his contemporaries, even the academic Reynolds, it is best to look beyond iconological content.’
      • ‘Such issues are not the stuff of academic painting, which operates within a closed system.’
      • ‘Charles Russell invites us to break out of the confinements of academic art and art history in order to open our eyes a little wider and take a glimpse at what is a far greater vision.’
      • ‘When modernists eventually revolted against academic history painting, they did not uniformly abandon this august dream.’
      • ‘Between 1940 and '42 he studied fine and commercial art, from academic nudes to lettering.’
      • ‘This painting within a painting shows a flayed figure whose blue body resembles an ecorche statuette used in academic life-study classes.’
  • 2Not of practical relevance; of only theoretical interest.

    ‘the debate has been largely academic’
    • ‘The question is of more than academic interest for players, officials and the WRU itself.’
    • ‘Parliament chiefs insist the figure is purely academic and was calculated because of the need to estimate a replacement value for all government buildings.’
    • ‘To pursue this line of reasoning in this case is really only of academic interest and of no practical import.’
    • ‘This is something that is of more academic than practical interest.’
    • ‘A loss against India will mean the champions are out of the championship and their final league match against Bangladesh will be only of academic interest.’
    • ‘The outcome of a game where there is no personal investment is usually of academic interest.’
    • ‘All this is of more than academic interest to the City.’
    • ‘The fact that he cannot speak or hear is just a matter of academic interest.’
    • ‘This is not of mere academic interest to the Swiss.’
    • ‘Polygamy may seem an exotic topic, but it is not just of historical or academic interest.’
    • ‘That solution is of more than academic interest.’
    • ‘I realise this is of purely academic interest to readers.’
    • ‘‘I think my interest in hurricanes was academic until Andrew,’ Landsea said.’
    • ‘The US debate over offshoring of high skilled jobs is of more than academic interest to New Zealand.’
    • ‘That finding may be of more than academic interest.’
    • ‘This discussion is not of purely academic interest, because it has arisen in a practical way in a number of different contexts in recent years.’
    • ‘These are questions of more than academic interest.’
    • ‘I mean, I've got a few labs and some plans, but it's purely an academic interest for me.’
    • ‘I used to have what I thought of as a purely academic interest in Nazi propaganda.’
    • ‘The final game against Castlebar Mitchells was of academic interest only as Ballyhaunis could not make the play-offs.’
    theoretical, conceptual, notional, philosophical, unpragmatic, hypothetical, speculative, conjectural, conjectured, suppositional, putative
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noun

  • A teacher or scholar in a college or institute of higher education.

    • ‘The Liberal Democrats have been targeting students and academics on campus.’
    • ‘Inside Out showed anonymous copies of some of the student essays to academics.’
    • ‘It became a bestseller on the shelves of students, academics and workers throughout the land.’
    • ‘Along with most academics he had strong views on how research should be managed.’
    • ‘It will also include a series of lectures from internationally-renowned academics.’
    • ‘Many of the appointees have been academics rather than professional lawyers.’
    • ‘Up to four different lectures were held each day by academics such as Professor Anthony Grayling.’
    • ‘However, some academics pour cold water on the notion of a machine-created universe.’
    • ‘Everyone can benefit from the most respected academics and the best tutors.’
    • ‘Of greater significance was the conservative outlook of the University's academics.’
    • ‘The last two books on offer are both compendiums of articles by different academics.’
    • ‘The book will be most suitable for research students, postdocs and academics.’
    • ‘There had been no angry questions from the academics among his audience.’
    • ‘An insightful and intelligent collection of resources for academics and students.’
    • ‘However, it is doubtful that such a move would be well-received by students and academics.’
    • ‘Educational visits are high on the list but contrary to belief the office is not just for scholars and academics.’
    • ‘He is equally a loss to fellow academics and to the various committees on which he served.’
    • ‘I've seen black professors asked about their experience as academics in a white profession.’
    • ‘The survey was carried out at Glasgow Royal Infirmary by Glasgow University academics.’
    • ‘Only in very special cases do academics receive honorary doctorates from their own universities.’
    scholar, lecturer, don, teacher, educator, instructor, trainer, tutor, professor, fellow, man of letters, woman of letters, highbrow, thinker, bluestocking
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Origin

Mid 16th century: from French académique or medieval Latin academicus, from academia (see academy).

Pronunciation

academic

/ˌakəˈdemik//ˌækəˈdɛmɪk/