Definition of absorption in US English:

absorption

noun

  • 1The process or action by which one thing absorbs or is absorbed by another.

    ‘shock absorption’
    ‘East Germany's absorption into West Germany’
    • ‘This allows faster processing and greater absorption of information.’
    • ‘Instead of ending the play with the hitman's absorption into the group, however, there's a gratuitous plot-twist.’
    • ‘Essentially it is made of bones known as vertebrae with a disc for shock absorption between the vertebrae.’
    • ‘From a British point of view, further absorption into the European Union will be a disaster.’
    • ‘Eating dishes cooked with a variety of spices and herbs helps the process of digestion - absorption, assimilation and elimination.’
    • ‘Shock absorption is especially important for fitness instructors.’
    • ‘Cholesterol taken up by bacterial cells in the intestine is unlikely to be available for absorption into the blood.’
    • ‘They solubilize dietary lipids facilitating their hydrolysis by lipases and their absorption into the bloodstream.’
    • ‘Persecution and absorption into popular Christianity served to cut short many pagan religious practices.’
    • ‘In children the problems of poor vitamin and mineral absorption can cause stunted growth and dental problems if the condition is not recognised.’
    • ‘Oxygen is the fuel that starts the chemical process of nutrient absorption through a seedling's root tips.’
    • ‘And be sure to paint the inside of the planter to minimize water absorption into the wood.’
    • ‘Nor is it merely that their absorption into domesticity makes functional sense in a commercial and industrial society.’
    • ‘Here status preservation came through absorption into the expanding state bureaucracy and army.’
    • ‘Today, we confront the more subtle threat of absorption into the larger community.’
    • ‘The relatively quick absorption into the bloodstream enables a rapid headache response.’
    • ‘Its molded cushioning cradles my foot for maximum shock absorption.’
    • ‘But milk appeared to inhibit the antioxidant potential of the flavonoids, reducing their absorption into the bloodstream.’
    • ‘Spam's absorption into popular culture indicates that it has become a fact of life.’
    • ‘People with high-arches tend to require greater shock absorption.’
    incorporation, assimilation, integration, appropriation, taking in, subsuming, inclusion, co-opting, swallowing up
    reduction, decrease, lessening, softening, deadening, cushioning
    soaking up, sucking up, drawing in, drawing up, taking in, taking up, blotting up, mopping up, sponging up, sopping up
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  • 2The fact or state of being engrossed in something.

    ‘her absorption in the problems of the Third World’
    • ‘There is a memorable letter of 1910 in which he justifies his total absorption in composition, and gives a unique account of the genesis of two of his works.’
    • ‘The intensity of and absorption in play finds no explanation in biological analysis.’
    • ‘His absorption with the world of advertising and the intricacies associated with it find dominant echoes in his works.’
    • ‘Even laziness, inattention and simple absorption in the mundane can gradually erode the capacities in which this property resides.’
    • ‘Sometimes a museum capitalizes on our absorption with money.’
    • ‘Brenna abruptly looked up, her absorption with the piece broken.’
    • ‘Wilder captures the childlike adoration of the father and absorption in the way the world works.’
    • ‘The sports talk station gives you a succession of men whose absorption in a fantasy world is, to me, borderline insane.’
    • ‘Eventually Tocqueville's single-minded absorption in French affairs will lead him away from America altogether.’
    • ‘To be sure, his later absorption in philosophy made him neglect his private affairs and he eventually fell to a level of comparative poverty.’
    • ‘While sneaking out of their rooms, he saw you walking down the hallway and in all your absorption in your books, you didn't flicker a glance at him.’
    • ‘His love for Sydney and his total absorption in the affairs of his adopted country never wavered.’
    • ‘It turns out that absorption in his work had left him no time for children, hobbies, or close friendships.’
    • ‘The speaker's absorption in the beautiful image turns him into a Narcissus who can never be satisfied.’
    • ‘What motivates Colin Marshall is just total absorption in what he is doing and he is proud of it.’
    • ‘His apparent absorption in his own thoughts borders on the rude.’
    • ‘Psychologists talk about flow, a term that describes a state of total absorption in a task, and in which people are often at their happiest.’
    • ‘Anna has been using her absorption in work to avoid even thinking about these issues.’
    • ‘This sense of enchantment, of utter absorption in a moment, is fundamental to the lyric and lies at the heart of what it has to offer.’
    • ‘Using his absorption with the computer as my defense, I declined to plug in.’
    immersion, intentness, raptness, involvement, engrossment, occupation, engagement, preoccupation, captivation, monopolization
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Origin

Late 16th century (in the sense ‘the swallowing up of something’): from Latin absorptio(n-), from absorbere ‘swallow up’ (see absorb).

Pronunciation