Definition of abduction in English:

abduction

noun

  • 1The action or an instance of forcibly taking someone away against their will.

    ‘they organized the abduction of Mr. Cordes on his way to the airport’
    ‘abductions by armed men in plain clothes’
    • ‘The actual number of such abductions by strangers turned out to be 200 to 300 a year.’
    • ‘All have denied involvement in the abduction of the 54 -year-old father of three.’
    • ‘Sectarian tensions had already been running high, and the abductions threaten to provoke armed conflict.’
    • ‘The abduction happened outside the pub, when the girls were led to a nearby car, Basildon Crown Court heard.’
    • ‘A special law was enacted to make such abductions a capital offence, punishable by hanging.’
    • ‘Unlike political or terrorist acts, criminal abductions were found to largely occur without any accomplices.’
    • ‘She helps police investigate murders, abductions, rapes and extortions.’
    • ‘Everywhere you look and in everything you read you hear about child abductions and murders.’
    • ‘Four men are expected to appear in the magistrate's court on Tuesday in connection with the rape and abduction of a British tourist.’
    • ‘We've also heard of several more abductions and now assassinations.’
    • ‘The scene is still one of bewilderment and fear as reports of abductions and murder grab the headlines.’
    • ‘Child abduction is a rare enough crime and for two children to be taken by someone they don't know without signs of a struggle is stranger still.’
    • ‘The abductions give militants the high-profile publicity they seek to show they are still a force to be reckoned with.’
    • ‘I have read that stranger abductions are actually on the decline in the past couple of years.’
    • ‘On some occasions, reports of sexual assaults or abductions given to the police were simply lost.’
    • ‘They were also responsible for hundreds of religious and political abductions and assassinations.’
    • ‘It would be a rewarding research project to try to chart this out, most especially in the area of UFOs, alien abductions, and the like.’
    • ‘In America, the current wave of reports of alien abduction bears a strong resemblance to out of body experiences.’
    • ‘He still wonders if the two abductions were connected in some way.’
    • ‘And actually, the statistics show that the number of child abductions has not gone up.’
    kidnapping, kidnap, hostage-taking
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (in legal use) the illegal removal of a child from its parents or guardians.
      • ‘Removal of a child from a parent without lawful authority may amount to the criminal offence of child abduction.’
      • ‘The solicitor, guiding delegates around the legal minefield of parental abduction, wants the law amended.’
      • ‘Karen's abduction by her parents is no less characteristic of a particular conception of family, and the law of the father.’
      • ‘In some cases of abduction, the abducting parent is mentally unstable and/or a drug abuser.’
      • ‘In 2002, her mother was charged with abduction and a court order banned her from taking the youngster out of the country.’
  • 2Physiology
    The movement of a limb or other part away from the midline of the body, or from another part.

    The opposite of adduction
    • ‘Any movement requiring abduction of the arm more than 90 degrees is painful.’
    • ‘Shoulder-joint abduction is an important action in all sports that require you to raise your arms or reach up.’
    • ‘Typically, the patient presents with the arm held close to the body in abduction and internal rotation.’
    • ‘Normal hip range of motion includes abduction, adduction, circumduction, extension, and flexion.’
    • ‘Adduction is a more extensive movement than abduction because abduction is limited by the lateral side of the radius.’
    • ‘Follow-up examination at 1 week after injury revealed gross weakness in external rotation and abduction.’

Pronunciation

abduction

/æbˈdəkʃ(ə)n//abˈdəkSH(ə)n/