Definition of abdication in English:

abdication

noun

  • 1An act of abdicating or renouncing the throne.

    ‘Edward VIII did not marry until after his abdication’
    • ‘His reckless gamble lasted but a Hundred Days, culminating in Waterloo and his second abdication.’
    • ‘Following Alexander's formal abdication in September 1886, Stambolov headed the regency council.’
    • ‘In 1918, with the abdication of the last Habsburg, Karl I, the modern Republic of Austria was founded.’
    • ‘She became the mistress of Ludwig I in Munich in 1846, an affair which eventually led to the King's abdication in 1848.’
    • ‘The hall was Emperor Qianlong's study after his abdication.’
    • ‘British troops and armoured cars then surrounded the royal palace and Lampson demanded Farouk's abdication.’
    • ‘The conference at Abernethy ended in the abdication of Constantin.’
    • ‘King Hussein took the throne in 1952 following the abdication of his ailing father.’
    • ‘He refused to make a formal announcement of his abdication or to come to the capital.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, Russia's problems did not disappear with the abdication.’
    • ‘Reddy believes that the abdication of Edward VIII was a continuation of the War of the Roses.’
    • ‘On 12 February 1912 an edict of abdication was issued on behalf of the child Emperor.’
    • ‘His death was followed 11 months later by King Edward VIII's abdication.’
    • ‘Attempting to apprise the mob of Louis-Philippe's abdication, an elderly marshal on a white horse preceded by a trumpeter went unheard.’
    • ‘On 22 June, Napoleon signed his second and final abdication.’
    • ‘It carried off the declaration which has already been made public in the announcement of abdication.’
    • ‘On 9 August 1886, he was forced by a group of Russophile Bulgarian officers to sign a statement of abdication.’
    • ‘He became King George VI upon the abdication of his brother, King Edward VIII, later duke of Windsor.’
    • ‘Queen Christina was keenly interested in music both before and after her abdication.’
    • ‘The first abdication of Napoleon in 1814 had again allowed British tourists into Rome.’
    resignation, retirement
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  • 2Failure to fulfill a responsibility or duty.

    ‘we are witnessing an abdication of responsibility on the part of state governments’
    • ‘It is also part of an ever-growing abdication of responsibility on the part of our political leaders.’
    • ‘The state, on its part, has been impartial in its abdication of responsibility with regard to women of all communities.’
    • ‘I think the war in Iraq has more to do with the media's abdication of its responsibilities than the deficiencies of our president.’
    • ‘What we are really witnessing is an abdication of responsibility on the part of European governments for the implementation of a potentially beneficial technology.’
    • ‘The acceptance of this privately drafted law by the Oireachtas would amount to a wholesale abdication of its legislative function.’
    • ‘Catering to such people might even be considered an abdication of responsibility for a program director bent on public service.’
    • ‘Its abdication of responsibility pertaining to right wing talk radio is particularly pathetic.’
    • ‘To equivocate in the face of it would be an absolute abdication of intellectual responsibility.’
    • ‘Yet any implication of presidential abdication of the policy formulation role in this sphere is a misconstruction.’
    • ‘That's an abdication of responsibility towards the most vulnerable members of society.’
    • ‘The Arizona attorney-general called the situation "a national abdication by the Justice Department."’
    • ‘Furthermore, we have a deference to authority that amounts to an abdication of individual responsibility.’
    • ‘We have had a complete abdication of responsibility by the Government.’
    • ‘It is a self-conscious abdication of responsibility, for the sake of an individual ego.’
    • ‘To demand that the police are there to protect you is an abdication of your own responsibilities.’
    • ‘Or there may be a tendency to place too much faith in Fate, which leads to an abdication of personal responsibility.’
    • ‘This, combined with poor prospects for economic gain by the British, resulted in a de facto abdication of many responsibilities of governance.’
    • ‘Spoiling your ballot paper (s) today is an abdication of personal responsibility.’
    • ‘This is an abdication of what education is about.’
    • ‘Garrow offers three basic reasons why he thinks Justice Blackmun is guilty of "a scandalous abdication of judicial responsibility."’
    disowning, renunciation, rejection, refusal, avoidance, abnegation, relinquishment, abjuration, repudiation, waiving, yielding, forgoing, abandonment, surrender, disgorgement, casting aside
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Pronunciation

abdication

/ˌabdəˈkāSH(ə)n//ˌæbdəˈkeɪʃ(ə)n/