Definition of abaft in English:

abaft

adverb

Nautical
  • In or behind the stern of a ship.

    • ‘A built-in motor bracket cuts cockpit noise and adds security in big seas from abaft.’
    • ‘With six months' stores, she draws twenty-two foot nine, abaft.’
    • ‘The swell was either just abaft or on the beam and at night you couldn't see it.’
    • ‘It's when the breeze comes from the side, and slightly abaft of abeam, that a vessel can achieve its fastest point of sail.’
    • ‘Terry looked abaft himself and saw that the fearsome man had indeed gone.’
    • ‘The blizzard made it impossible to see anything abaft of the bridge.’

preposition

Nautical
  • Nearer the stern than; behind.

    ‘the yacht has a shower just abaft the galley’
    • ‘When a mainsail was set up in the correct place abaft the genoa, the strain on the headsail sheet was observed to rise considerably.’
    • ‘The carpenter had turned the capstan just abaft the mainmast into a perfectly acceptable desk.’
    • ‘The first of two hatches to the control room section is immediately abaft the sail, being the main access into the boat.’
    • ‘Dropping down abaft the bridge, the first thing to come into view was the funnel.’
    • ‘With this security he had established as his right a caboose abaft the funnel in the midships Bofors gunshield where the gun had been removed.’

Origin

Middle English (in the sense backward): from a- (expressing motion) + archaic baft in the rear.

Pronunciation:

abaft

/əˈbaft/