verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Transport (goods or people) on a ship.

    ‘the wounded soldiers were shipped home’
    • ‘Manila and the adjacent ports are the best equipped to ship manufactured goods.’
    • ‘Nearly 40 percent of the containers are shipped back to California ports empty.’
    • ‘At 25 he joined the service and was shipped to the Philippines.’
    • ‘During the spring of 1941, the plane was shipped to Britain and went into service with the Royal Air Force as a Hurricane Mark I.’
    • ‘Arab roofers and master tilers were shipped from Morocco.’
    • ‘In 1686 alone these colonies shipped goods worth over £1 million to London.’
    • ‘If all else fails, the mafia hijack transports of cigarettes and alcohol and then ship the stolen goods into Britain.’
    • ‘She said that Namibia's access to the sea via the port of Walvis Bay would be a bonus for Namibia to ship goods to the US via the Atlantic Ocean.’
    • ‘Community service, national service, shipping the offenders off to some far off land like Australia?’
    • ‘It takes another 12 days to ship goods directly from Tanjung Priok to Busan Port in South Korea.’
    • ‘Studying the debacle of the spoiled shipment, he surmised that other companies shipping perishable goods to Asia must have had similar experiences.’
    • ‘From its piers Iraq began to ship the goods from those factories to buyers in other countries throughout the region.’
    • ‘For quite a while I was a merchant, shipping goods to the Baronies, but when I saw what a fair town this was, I eventually decided to stay, and moved my collection here.’
    • ‘Trade goods were shipped from French Atlantic ports to Quebec, then to Montreal, to be sold to small companies of traders licensed to deal with Native suppliers in the interior.’
    • ‘Furthermore, he was the first man who shipped peaches from the United States to Europe.’
    • ‘Of course, we'll cut their benefits, combat pay and make it difficult to ship their goods home from their overseas postings.’
    • ‘The Air Service shipped some 3,000 carpenters, bricklayers, and laborers to England to prepare these facilities.’
    • ‘The city currently spends $1.2 million annually to ship discarded bags to China for recycling.’
    • ‘If goods are shipped to or from the United States, this bill of lading shall be subject to US Carriage of Goods by Sea Act 1936.’
    convey, carry, take, transfer, move, shift, bring, fetch, send, deliver, bear, conduct, haul, lug, cart, run, ship, ferry
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Send by some other means of transport or by mail.
      ‘the freight would be shipped by rail’
      ‘spare parts were quickly shipped out’
      ‘his papers have already been shipped to the University of Kansas’
      • ‘The construction company is shipping the goods to the town and is asking its customers to help with the appeal for goods and building materials.’
      • ‘For the same reasons, many U.S. online merchants, particularly smaller companies, do not currently ship goods to Canada.’
      • ‘It also owns transport companies, which are essential for shipping goods around the country.’
      • ‘When we speak of trade, we usually think of goods being shipped across borders.’
      • ‘Transportation costs had to be incurred to ship goods to consumers in proportion to their distance from producers.’
      • ‘Unbelievably, most of the 1.5 billion tons of hazardous cargo shipped across this country every year go unchecked.’
      • ‘For many years, material and bulk goods were shipped to military bases via rail, but now deliveries are made mostly by commercial trucks.’
      • ‘A lot of our products are shipped by air.’
    2. 1.2[no object] (of a product) be made available for purchase.
      ‘the cellular phone is expected to ship at about $500 sometime this summer’
      • ‘The company has already announced that the product will ship in Russia, Thailand, Malaysia and Indonesia.’
      • ‘Expect more to be revealed when the product ships in Japan in July.’
      • ‘The delay is surely something of an embarrassment for the company, which recently promised the product would ship on 30 June.’
      • ‘Instead of companies being tied to the MySQL General Public License the product will ship under a commercial license.’
      • ‘Support for IP is expected to be added some time after the product ships later this year.’
    3. 1.3ship out[no object] (of a naval force) go to sea from a home port.
      ‘Bob got sick a week before we shipped out’
      • ‘Finally, on the morning of July 18 the regiment broke camp and boarded the transport Pennsylvania to ship out for the Philippines.’
      • ‘For Martha Treadway, late August 1918 was dominated by the fear that Osie and Johnnie would ship out at any moment and she would never see them again.’
      • ‘Whatever one believes, the accident has left deep anxiety among sailors who have just graduated from naval training and are about to ship out.’
      • ‘For troops who have just returned from overseas or for those about to ship out, the USO is a valuable source of help and support.’
      • ‘Lt. Philips has been called to active duty and is to ship out next week for Kuwait.’
      • ‘The 203rd Legion has been ordered to ship out immediately.’
      • ‘One just about to ship out, the other coming home for the holidays.’
      • ‘U.S. troops get a preview of battlefield conditions before they ship out.’
      • ‘There was a time when young men from small towns in Texas were forced to ship out to New York or Hollywood in order to fulfill their dream of seeing themselves on the big screen.’
      • ‘When the 356th got ready to ship out they only needed one Replacement Pilot so they kept Withers and sent three of us back to Westover for re-assignment.’
    4. 1.4dated [no object] Embark on a ship.
      ‘people wishing to get from London to New York ship at Liverpool’
    5. 1.5[no object] (of a sailor) serve on a ship.
      ‘Jack, you shipped with the Admiral once, didn't you?’
  • 2(of a boat) take in (water) over the side.

    • ‘It is shipping water heavily, as last year's £247m loss demonstrates, and needs to throw half of its businesses overboard if it is to avoid being sunk by its debts.’
    • ‘By the next morning, 1 June 1916, the Lutzow was shipping enough water to keep her speed below 5 knots.’
    • ‘We were shipping a lot of water over the deck.’
    • ‘Imagine a number of passengers in an overcrowded lifeboat which has begun to ship water.’
    • ‘Keeping close to the lee shore with John in the bows watching out for rocks, which could be the size of a small car we slowly made our way back to base, shipping a lot of water as we did so.’
    • ‘He told me afterwards the yacht was believed to be shipping water and the fate of the skipper was not known.’
  • 3Take (oars) from the oarlocks and lay them inside a boat.

    • ‘Katherine moved right out on deck just as Matt shipped his oars and called out.’
    • ‘Then the crew of the long boat shipped their oars and headed for the shore of the chosen island.’
    • ‘It get very annoying to have to, in effect, ship one's oars every time he passes, and continually having to check what he's doing.’
    • ‘A hundred yards out he shipped the oars and started the motor.’
    • ‘Slowly, she got into the rowing boat, shipped the oars and made her way across to the centre of the river.’
    • ‘The barge slowed as it approached the quay, and the rowers shipped their oars.’
    • ‘He quickly shipped his oar and shoved Lori roughly out of the way as he took care of hers.’
    • ‘Once the boat had settled we shipped the oars, got out our lines, baited the hooks and dropped them over the gunwale.’
    1. 3.1 Fix (something such as a rudder or mast) in its place on a ship.

verb

[NO OBJECT]informal
  • Support or have a particular interest in a romantic pairing between two characters in a fictional series, often when this relationship is one portrayed by fans rather than depicted in the series itself.

    ‘I'm still shipping for Edward/Hermione’
    [with object] ‘if you ship Paul and Sarah, then you'd better avert your eyes for this next part’
    • ‘I ship for Harry/Hermione because, well, they're always dropping hints.’
    • ‘I don’t ship Aragorn/Legolas, but there’s so much subtext in the movies with all the significant looks they exchange.’
    • ‘I've been shipping for Emily/Jack since the pilot of season 1.’
    • ‘I ship Aragorn and Boromir: it's so sad at his death and Aragorn kisses his forehead.’
    • ‘Mindy/Danny are meant to be together, no rush; the anticipation is a huge part of what makes shipping these guys so much fun.’
    • ‘No Mindy-Jeremy shipping for now: one of the story lines they had just begun shooting was Jeremy dating one of Mindy's best friends.’
    • ‘People who ship Sam and Frodo literally disgust me.’
    • ‘Ever since I became attached to the Harry Potter universe I have always shipped for Harry/Hermione all the way.’
    • ‘Love Downton Abbey: specifially ship Mr Carson and Mrs Hughes.’
    • ‘I'm shipping hard on Danny and Mindy on The Mindy Project!’