noun

  • A person with an extreme or irrational fear of or aversion to something.

    ‘a snake phobic’
    • ‘We conducted a series of experiments in which severe phobics received different types of treatments designed to raise their sense of personal efficacy.’
    • ‘The only 'problem' here is in the minds of the phobics, and the answer should be to educate them rather than preserve someone else's misery.’
    • ‘I'll accept those accusations, but I'd rather be this way than be a bigoted phobic.’
    • ‘Then there is the social phobic's nadir, Christmas, to deal with.’
    • ‘Slower and generally more expensive, rail travel is now just for phobics and romantics.’
    • ‘I couldn't exactly run off, phobic that I am.’
    • ‘Phobics have acquired a "semantics of freedom," in which their family heroes take risks and travel the globe with their heads held high, while others cower at home.’
    • ‘This is a natural biological mechanism necessary for survival, but it is exaggerated in phobics, and the stimulus is rarely life-threatening.’
    • ‘They tested the memory of spider phobics after the participants were presented with a large spider.’
    • ‘Any genuine phobics will be praying she topples out of her harness.’

Pronunciation:

phobic

/ˈfōbik/