noun

  • 1An image that has been morphed by computer animation.

    • ‘The sounds ushering from the two morphs on the screen weren't any better, though, and he couldn't block those out.’
    • ‘The digital morph can also play an important role in the sound dimension of the text.’
    1. 1.1 An instance of morphing an image.
      • ‘But, you know, I would play the entire action, that the other actor did, so that they could choose when and where, in post-production, the morph was going to start.’
      • ‘Loop format is especially suitable in the case of the author using digital morphs to program a text so that it progresses from one verse to another.’
      • ‘A discrete morph can be thought of as an animation starting from the initial object and ending with the final object after a given number of the intermediate objects.’
      • ‘I expect if I was at school now I would be doing the project on the PC and could create an animation in which the morph occurs in one fluid movement.’
      • ‘There's some stunning works, and an intriguing computer morph that shows how depictions of the Lord's face have changed over time.’

Pronunciation:

morph

/môrf/

Definition of morph in English:

morph

noun

  • 1Linguistics
    An actual linguistic form.

    ‘the present participle in English is always the morph “-ing.”’
    • ‘When it deals with morphs and morphemes, morphology is known as morphemics.’
  • 2Biology
    Each of several variant forms of an animal or plant.

    • ‘The four females seen mating during two nesting attempts all remated with the same morph.’
    • ‘Juveniles are gray or white, with the white morph more common.’
    • ‘In some cases, variation in reproductive strategies has led to alternative queen morphs.’
    • ‘Analysis of heterochronic processes associated with sexual dimorphism requires the arbitrary choice of a reference morph in the dimorphic pair.’
    • ‘Starch was not detected in the pollen of any morph.’

Origin

1940s: from Greek morphē form.

Pronunciation:

morph

/môrf/