Main definitions of metric in English

: metric1metric2

metric1

adjective

  • 1Of or based on the meter as a unit of length; relating to the metric system.

    ‘all measurements are given in metric form’
    • ‘The tool accepts both inch and metric data, and computes parameters such as torque.’
    • ‘Give weights, measurements, and medication dosages in metric units and temperatures in both Fahrenheit and Celsius degrees.’
    • ‘Further, the news that the kilo is in such imminent danger of extinction will no doubt be seen as a vindication by Brits reluctant to sell their fruit and veg in metric units.’
    • ‘The minister said the review will be part of a planned changeover to metric speed limit signage, from MPH to kilometers per hour.’
    • ‘Water was used as the basis for establishing the metric unit of mass, however, so it is easier to remember that a cubic centimeter of it has a mass of 1 gm.’
    • ‘A button can also convert a number between Imperial and metric units, or look up a word in the dictionary, or fetch data from a database or Web site.’
    • ‘All this really means is that you are not using metric units.’
    • ‘The metric version of these numbers is 26.5 liters per kilogram of beans’
    • ‘Most metric recipes were based on a weight unit of 25 grams - slightly less than an ounce - and a liquid measure of half a litre, which was slightly less than a pint.’
    • ‘The first mission, Mars Climate Orbiter, didn't stop fast enough and crashed into Mars because engineers didn't convert between metric and imperial units properly.’
    • ‘He used the pyramids as support for a totally barmy argument against metric units.’
    • ‘But metric units needed paper for calculations and hence they were not related to everyday life.’
    • ‘Each color has its own wavelength, from dark red, which has the longest wavelength, to violet, which has the shortest wavelength, expressed in metric units of length.’
    • ‘The road is measured in miles, or in these EU directed metric times, kilometres and the journey in hours and minutes.’
    • ‘Most students will more immediately comprehend data given in the text because of the use of English rather than metric units.’
    • ‘In the United States, the engineers work in imperial units, while in the rest of the world, metric units are primarily used.’
    • ‘This is a rare case of a social scientific measure that has become so well known that the measure and the concept are almost as synonymous as temperature and the centigrade or Fahrenheit scales, or as length and the metric scale.’
    • ‘This system contains most of the metric units you are used to, like meters and kilograms, but also includes units for many other physical and engineering properties.’
    • ‘Our modern metric units, like the gram or the centimetre, originate from their handy description of everyday quantities.’
    • ‘Our products are offered both in inch and metric sizes.’
    1. 1.1 Relating to or using the metric system.
      ‘we should have gone metric years ago’
  • 2Mathematics Physics
    Relating to or denoting a metric.

    • ‘Progress was being made in that gravitation was described for the first time by the metric tensor but still the theory was not right.’
    • ‘He also conformed, perhaps more happily, to the decisions regarding the metric division of angles into 100 subdivisions.’
    • ‘The relationship is precisely specified by the most profound equation of STR, usually called the metric equation (or line metric equation).’
    • ‘Isoperi metric problems have been a source of important mathematical ideas and techniques since classical antiquity.’
    • ‘It is possible to prove the above result without using metric properties (merely using order axioms), but it is not possible to drop the order axioms themselves.’

Origin

Mid 19th century (as an adjective relating to length): from French métrique, from mètre (see metre).

Pronunciation

metric

/ˈmɛtrɪk//ˈmetrik/

Main definitions of metric in English

: metric1metric2

metric2

adjective

  • Relating to or composed in a poetic meter.

    • ‘Humor raises no such difficulty, for it is a purely formal device, more akin to the metric pattern of verse than to that of a trope.’
    • ‘In a previous lesson, Flint introduced the concept of metric feet (rhythmic modes), since she knew Nadan was studying poetry.’
    • ‘Also painfully absent is any discussion of the poetry, of the metric and formal characteristics of these texts, their historic or social changes, or their regional idiosyncrasies.’
    • ‘He was interested in sonority, metric freedom, and rhythmic force.’
    • ‘There's something tired about sample-based music which still holds everything together with a metric beat, especially a generic ‘hip hop’ beat.’
    • ‘All metric translations strictly follow the original Sanskrit verse format.’
    • ‘I opted for freedom, though on many occasions continuing to use familiar metric forms, but rejuvenated within the iridescent world of metaphor.’

Origin

Late 15th century (denoting the branch of study dealing with meter): via Latin from Greek metrikos, from metron (see metre).

Pronunciation

metric

/ˈmɛtrɪk//ˈmetrik/