adverb

  • 1For a long time.

    ‘we hadn't known them long’
    ‘an experience they will long remember’
    ‘his long-awaited Grand Prix debut’
    • ‘Einstein had long lived in horror of his bomb, which was supposed to erase evil from the planet.’
    • ‘The Roman Catholic Church has long been criticised for failing to keep up with the times.’
    • ‘At barbecues, food must not be left lying around too long outside and must be cooked thoroughly.’
    • ‘Journalists, and their editors, have long rankled at the obvious attempt at manipulation.’
    • ‘In the United States, voting has long been a minority activity; so it is becoming in Britain.’
    • ‘I will think long and hard before I give my number out again.’
    • ‘They had long been sought by police in connection with a series of violent motorcycle thefts.’
    • ‘Both initiatives came into effect yesterday and both are things the taxi drivers have long campaigned for.’
    • ‘I like my job, but other than that, there aren't really many reasons for me to stay long at all.’
    • ‘Having been a racegoer for twenty years there are a couple of performances that live long in the memory.’
    • ‘He has channelled his emotional pain into a vigorous and passionate account that will live long in my memory.’
    • ‘The Government Information Service had long been a byword for incompetence.’
    • ‘Rangers and United had their moments, but not enough at either end to make it a match that will live long in the memory.’
    • ‘The prospect of a woman defeating a man in sport has long had allure in America.’
    • ‘Scotland has long had a relatively low population compared with similar European countries.’
    • ‘The film has a power that causes it to linger long in the memory.’
    • ‘On Booker shortlists, the preponderance of some subjects over others has long been a source of comment.’
    • ‘This was a darts match that will live long in the memory of all who witnessed it.’
    • ‘Don't you think that cloud is staying there awfully long?’
    • ‘Nor are you likely to be waiting here long before somebody recognises your need for a cold drink or a coffee.’
    1. 1.1In questions about a period of time.
      ‘how long have you been working?’
      • ‘Police said they had no idea how long the factory had been in operation, but estimated it to be around three or four months.’
      • ‘I'm hopeful that I will find another job but who knows how long it will take.’
      • ‘We asked them questions too, about how long they had been there and when they would be getting out.’
      • ‘Questions ranged from how long the baby had been on mother's milk to how often the baby fell sick.’
      • ‘I'm not sure how long you have lived away from these shores but the British Empire does not exist anymore.’
      • ‘He did not say how long the military would delay an attack on the headquarters.’
      • ‘Tell me about Jodie, how long you'd known her and how close you were, what sort of person she was.’
      • ‘Checking into a hotel that night, he was asked how long he was staying.’
      • ‘A key question is how long it will take for new policies to take effect.’
      • ‘How do you prepare for the winter when you have no clue how long it will last?’
      • ‘Dedicated nurses will let the patient know how long they could be waiting for treatment.’
      • ‘How long he can remain on the fence is a question for an uncertain future.’
      • ‘I'm not sure if I should join as I don't know how long I will stay with the company.’
      • ‘Mr Atkins said it was unknown how long the building would be closed for.’
      • ‘Find out how long it will last and what type of questions you will be asked so you can track the progress of the interview.’
      • ‘David isn't really sure how long he'll be here.’
      • ‘But organisers are not sure how long they can keep it going without more volunteers to help run it.’
      • ‘Have I been a raging misogynist for this long and simply not realised it?’
      • ‘I can't look at that picture without wondering how long it took them to get those shadows under his eyes.’
      • ‘When Scots meet me for the first time, they always ask how long I've been here.’
    2. 1.2At a time distant from a specified event or point of time.
      ‘it was abandoned long ago’
      ‘the work was compiled long after his death’
      • ‘The rock was a meteorite, blasted off the Red Planet long ago by the impact of a comet.’
      • ‘I'd go with my pals and play football or go cycling, even though this was long before mountain bikes came along.’
      • ‘It's a particularly unfashionable old hat that ought to have gone to the charity shop long ago.’
      • ‘Tunisia put the ball in Spain's net, but the whistle had long since gone for offside.’
      • ‘Bob sleighing was popular in and around La Plagne long before the Olympic course was built.’
      • ‘I gave up alcohol long ago as it would completely destroy me for days after.’
      • ‘The match proved a disaster for striker Ryan Senior, who broke a leg not long after his goal.’
      • ‘All of the gospel writers wrote their stories of Jesus' teaching and actions long after his death.’
      • ‘The men long ago stopped wearing tribal costumes.’
      • ‘I do not hear my mother come out of the sitting room until long after I have gone to bed.’
      • ‘Helen's lust for him died long before the end of the war.’
      • ‘Several of the action sequences will live in the memory long after the end of the final credits.’
      • ‘Doctors Hilary and Alan Hill fell in love with Argyll long before moving there.’
      • ‘There is no doubt that the Allies knew about the death camps long before the Russians liberated Majdanek.’
      • ‘I gave up smoking long ago.’
      • ‘We lost faith in pensions long ago.’
      • ‘Not long ago, my partner and I went on a week's vacation to Sicily.’
      • ‘Yet the Olympics have long since ceased to be a jamboree for the elite.’
      • ‘Meanwhile a forlorn figure leant against a goalpost long after the finish.’
      • ‘Some of these books were on the shelves long before I started to use the library nine years ago.’
    3. 1.3After an implied point of time.
      ‘he could not wait any longer’
      • ‘They will not keep you any longer than necessary.’
      • ‘Her father was a very important man in the city and he could not stay any longer no matter what his daughter wished.’
      • ‘We won't wait any longer for this country's children have health care and a quality education.’
    4. 1.4(after a noun of duration) throughout a specified period of time.
      ‘it rained all day long’
      • ‘It is no secret that Shutt has worked all year long to find such a player.’
      • ‘I'd throw a ball against the wall of our house all day long to learn the basics because I had no-one to play with.’
      • ‘Hayfever hits as many as one in ten of us every year, but for some allergy sufferers, the symptoms can last all year long.’
      • ‘The Percy committee is busy fund raising all year long to come up with the money for their event.’
      • ‘They will be in bloom all summer long, and require very little attention.’
      • ‘It's had a great spirit all season long and everybody came through for everybody else.’
      • ‘All night long the hockey pictures gaze down at you sleeping in your tracksuit.’
      • ‘There is a cinema which shows movies all day long and I am actually off to watch one in a few minutes.’
      • ‘The seniors told us, the new students, to do a lot of silly things all day long.’
      • ‘One Act Play Weekends showcase two to four plays that are, you guessed it, one act long.’
      • ‘Fatigue didn't matter, the ten men of Brazil could have kept the ball all day long and England knew it.’
      • ‘I almost felt like bursting into tears because we've taken so much flak all year long.’
      • ‘It is Everton who have been playing a cup final every week, all season long.’
      • ‘The training period was pleasantly like being paid money to play cards all day long.’
      • ‘This is one of my all time favourite dishes - I could eat it all day long.’
      • ‘I have to spend my precious day off in front of a PC doing nothing but geeky stuff all day long.’
  • 2(with reference to the ball in sports) at, to, or over a great distance, or further than expected or intended.

    ‘the quarterback dropped back and threw the ball long’
    • ‘Pete started off on the first tee hitting the ball very long and right down the middle.’
    • ‘Unfortunately we fell into that trap and started just lumping the ball long which isn't our style.’
    • ‘Instead, he pulls ten men back and hoofs the ball long, to be chased or held up by a willing workhorse.’
    • ‘The front two had little support other than balls knocked long to alleviate the pressure.’
    • ‘Bristol had a lineout on their own line and hooker Neil McCarthy threw the ball long.’
    1. 2.1Beyond the point aimed at; too far.
      ‘he threw the ball long’
      • ‘You can hit the ball harder and take a longer swing while minimizing the risk of sending the ball long.’
      • ‘The ball went long and out of play.’
      • ‘Too often Rio Ferdinand looked up and knocked it long because he didn't have an option.’
      • ‘The Belgian then began to get flustered and started spraying the balls long and wide.’
      • ‘It was only towards the end that Murray put some real beef into his shots, and then too often the ball flew long or wide.’

Pronunciation:

long

/läNG//lôNG/