Definition of logic in English:

logic

noun

  • 1Reasoning conducted or assessed according to strict principles of validity.

    ‘experience is a better guide to this than deductive logic’
    ‘he explains his move with simple logic’
    ‘the logic of the argument is faulty’
    • ‘Does anyone else see the faulty logic here?’
    • ‘He also claimed that when classicists applied deductive logic to these inadequate axioms they inevitably got inadequate results.’
    • ‘However, it is not the role of a studio to question the business logic of the client.’
    • ‘You've really fallen if you're understanding his twisted logic, a little voice in her brain pointed out.’
    • ‘We also showed in our earlier studies that tobacco smuggling defies apparent economic logic.’
    • ‘Once set in motion by the Creator they continued by their own inexorable internal logic.’
    • ‘No doubt he will be able to apply his twisted logic to it.’
    • ‘In this case, one can see the possibility of two sets of logic at work.’
    • ‘And to take such a stance, outside of the accepted discourse of reason, means that he can't use deductive logic to defend it.’
    • ‘Why, the logic goes, would we want independence when devolution is so bad?’
    • ‘I think he is attacking systematic philosophies and the idea of deductive logic.’
    • ‘I am apologetic here, as I do not understand your faulty logic in the aforementioned statement.’
    • ‘These critics argue that the restriction upsets the logic we use to reason with such predictions.’
    • ‘Whoever wishes to hold on to the distinction would need to maintain, according to his own logic, that he has always been there - a thesis which can all too easily be disproved.’
    • ‘That is the primary reason and logic behind media.’
    • ‘The logic of certain arguments requires that we entertain them up to a certain point.’
    • ‘Somehow, the unspoken logic goes, if we ignore it, it doesn't exist.’
    • ‘Thus it should be possible to use deductive logic to derive predictions from pseudoscientific hypotheses.’
    • ‘Allow me to follow the logic of your argument and see where this strategy would lead.’
    • ‘Only in retrospect can one discern some of the logic at work.’
    science of reasoning, science of deduction, science of thought, dialectics, argumentation, ratiocination
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A particular system or codification of the principles of proof and inference.
      ‘Aristotelian logic’
      • ‘What is wanted is first to develop a system of Aryan logic different from non-Aryan logic.’
      • ‘This work stems from work that Frege did with predicate logic and mathematics.’
      • ‘The ‘internal’ logic of smooth infinitesimal analysis is accordingly not full classical logic.’
      • ‘Formal logic is applied again, this time to determine whether a premature or erroneous idea prevails.’
      • ‘Philosophers trained in modern logic may accordingly feel that there is something either obscure or else superficial in the notion of irreducibly tensed predication.’
      • ‘There is one context in which the language of possible worlds is undoubtedly useful and even illuminating, namely, in the study of formal axiomatic systems of modal logic.’
      • ‘Frege's primary concern was to construct a system of logic, formulated in an idealized language, which was adequate for mathematical reasoning.’
      • ‘Fuzzy logic is used for controlling a wide variety of devices.’
      • ‘People have mental representations similar to sentences in predicate logic.’
      • ‘Process monitoring is performed by a controller that uses fuzzy logic and neural network technology.’
      • ‘Given that we are quoting Godel, I assumed that we were sticking to standard binary logic systems.’
      • ‘After all, what is so sacrosanct about first-order predicate logic in its standard form?’
    2. 1.2The systematic use of symbolic and mathematical techniques to determine the forms of valid deductive argument.
      • ‘That fall, the process of smoothing out and filling in the technical details of Wiles's celebrated result turned up a troublesome gap in the proof's logic.’
      • ‘In formal mathematical logic, one makes frequent use of the existential and universal quantifiers.’
    3. 1.3The quality of being justifiable by reason.
      ‘there's no logic in telling her not to hit people when that's what you're doing’
      • ‘That lacks logic, since the gap may have been larger a decade ago.’
      • ‘With opinions and arguments completely lacking in evidence, logic or relevance, this stuff is irresistible.’
      • ‘I know, I know, I've written about it before, but the lack of logic irritates me to no end.’
      • ‘In my opinion they represent an end in themselves and a complete lack of professional logic.’
      • ‘I remember being infuriated by the injustice and lack of logic.’
      • ‘The position is SO lacking in logic it makes me think that the unions have sold out just like our politicians.’
      • ‘Marked from the outset by frivolity, it also lacks substance and logic.’
      • ‘‘It illustrates the lack of logic that exists in current US law,’ he said.’
      • ‘You may disagree with them on the merits, but this disagreement turns on differences in moral axioms, not the other side's lack of logic.’
      • ‘There is a lack of logic in certain passages which reveals a sense of scepticism towards determination.’
      • ‘At the heart of the process is a mysterious lack of logic.’
      • ‘There is no inexorable logic dictating that the media must undermine the independence of the spheres of art and culture.’
      • ‘This production returns coherence, logic, and sanity to a masterpiece.’
      • ‘There's no logic to it, only a contagion of inferences.’
      • ‘Reason, logic, and common sense are practically a foreign language to this girl!’
      • ‘She was beginning to laugh a little, being painfully aware of the apparent lack of logic.’
      • ‘There is precisely no logic to his reasoning at all.’
      • ‘The lack of logic is not the only, nor the most important, finger pointed at the movie.’
      • ‘The worriers are increasingly getting tangled in their own lack of logic.’
      • ‘Even some of the proposed remedies lack any real logic, including the decision to close the staff final salary pension scheme only to new entrants.’
    4. 1.4The course of action or line of reasoning suggested or made necessary by.
      ‘if the logic of capital is allowed to determine events’
      • ‘Following the logic of postmodern criticism, we could assume a level of ironic distance.’
      • ‘They have also become consumer goods in themselves, which follow the logic of market.’
      • ‘In Scotland, by contrast, there remain few incentives for doctors or GPs to follow the logic of the market.’
      • ‘The truly religious, following the logic of submission to political and moral ideals, and to the arbitrary will of God, are terrifying to us and almost incomprehensible.’
      • ‘Ending world poverty means rejecting the logic of capitalism that puts profit before human need.’
      • ‘We no longer follow the logic of one size fits all, like earlier.’
      • ‘There was now to be no sanctuary where the logic of capitalism could not prevail.’
  • 2A system or set of principles underlying the arrangements of elements in a computer or electronic device so as to perform a specified task.

    • ‘Knowing algorithms, which is really the underlying piece of any logic in a computer program, is an extremely important skill for programmers.’
    • ‘As far as we can see, the patent doesn't explicitly refer to Flash, but it does refer to NAND gate logic, a key component of Flash memory.’
    • ‘Of course, CPUs, memory, core logic and motherboards have evolved substantially over the years.’
    • ‘The application server instructs the softswitch on how to complete the call according to the rules of the relevant service logic.’
    • ‘The computer program code logic is executed by the processing circuitry and is configured to generate an output signal.’
    • ‘Mac hardware today differs from PCs solely in the CPU, system logic and the motherboard they sit on.’
    • ‘This general approach has provided a well-engineered partitioning of the required computations across fixed and programmable logic.’
    • ‘He is a member of the PRL project there, which studies computer supported logic and computational type theory.’
    • ‘Those systems range from the simple database used to collect data to the most complex systems that utilize computer logic and improve efficiency.’
    • ‘A circuit embodying the present invention includes sample logic, arithmetic logic and cancellation logic.’
    • ‘In FireStarter's gameplay, we put a stake on worked-out balance and logic instead of scripted elements.’
    • ‘The second wave is syntactic: attacks against the operating logic of computers and networks.’
    • ‘The program's underlying logic is also now reflected in an orderly and commonsense interface which reflects this awesome program's true power.’
    • ‘One way logic is different from software is that it's inherently parallel.’
    1. 2.1Logical operations collectively.
      • ‘In such a PDA, DRAM cells normally are refreshed periodically by the memory controller logic present inside the CPU.’
      • ‘Unbuffered memory refers to memory modules that do not have buffer or register logic built in.’
      • ‘If performance parity is achieved, then moving to new core logic and memory is a non-issue, and it's easy to justify adopting those other neat new features.’
      • ‘USB OTG adds a small amount of additional logic, however, which allows a device to serve either as a host or peripheral.’
      • ‘Although the number of optimisations that the mapper carries out are limited, it can cluster logic in cells to improve overall usage and perform some power minimisation.’
      • ‘Another capability is that the software uses logic based on available memory to break up large models.’
      • ‘To use them, however, we need to implement them in physical reality so that the gates can perform their logic actively.’

Origin

Late Middle English: via Old French logique and late Latin logica from Greek logikē (tekhnē) (art) of reason from logos word, reason.

Pronunciation:

logic

/ˈläjik/