Main definitions of ling in English

: ling1ling2

ling1

noun

  • Any of a number of long-bodied edible marine fishes.

    • ‘Travelling several miles further out, you can fish above World War I ship-wrecks, including the Lusitania, around which there is a good chance of hooking a shark, ling or conger eel.’
    • ‘Under boulders live other fish, including large ling and many codling, while above the kelp line pollack shoals can cloud the brightness on a sunny day.’
    • ‘Huge conger, pollack, ling, cod and coalfish were regularly pulled up the steps to the old Angling Centre and weighed in front of big crowds of onlookers.’
    • ‘Try coley or ling to bulk out fish pies, or gurnard or rock turbot for roasting.’
    • ‘Here you come across some extremely large boulders covered in deadmen's fingers and anemones, interspersed with wolf fish, lobster, ling and conger eels.’

Origin

Middle English lenge, probably from Middle Dutch; related to long.

Pronunciation:

ling

/liNG/

Main definitions of ling in English

: ling1ling2

ling2

noun

  • The common heather of Eurasia.

    • ‘Now begins the long, gradual descent over Spaunton Moor, hot and silent and tinder dry, patched bright purple with heather of the bell variety, the rest frosted with the lilac buds of the main crop of ling heather.’
    • ‘Originally introduced from Esher Common, the native ling heathers have been added to in the last three years with advice on color from Gwynne.’
    • ‘This would give a warm, dry and snug shelter for the pigs or poultry which some people would thatch using reeds or perhaps ling (heather).’
    • ‘They walked at a wearisome pace across the trembling peat bog, knee deep in flowering ling, bog cotton and black slimy mud.’
    • ‘All of the 62 types of flowers, plants and shrubs used in the work, such as ling heather, bearberry, foxglove and gorse, come from County Mayo, which was hit particularly hard by the Famine.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old Norse lyng, of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

ling

/liNG/