Definition of Venetian in English:

Venetian

adjective

  • Relating to Venice or its people.

    • ‘The picture has the refreshing sparseness of Francesco Guardi's Venetian scenes, as opposed to the massiveness of Canaletto's.’
    • ‘When you see a 500-year-old Venetian building, it may be a bit shabby and possibly even in danger.’
    • ‘Sightseers will be able to hire boats, resembling Venetian gondolas, to take trips on the canal.’
    • ‘Yorkshire potter Arnup's latest work concentrates on geometric forms, especially from Venetian floor designs.’
    • ‘So this little wax portrait of the greatest Venetian painter and his son is a heartbreaking document.’
    • ‘Reynolds invoked the genius of the Venetian painters like Titian to support his argument, and also Rubens.’
    • ‘The Venetian painter Vittore Carpaccio pictured Saint Augustine seated at a table in a roomy study, pausing, his pen raised from the paper.’
    • ‘But a major development in the 18th century was the internationalization of the patronage of Venetian painters.’
    • ‘The Accademia gallery is to Venetian painting what the Uffizi is to Renaissance art in Florence.’
    • ‘You can find boutique hotels by top designers, B&Bs in frescoed 18 th-century mansions, Venetian estates converted into exquisite villas.’
    • ‘The Sunflower Masquerade Ball in aid of St Leonard's Hospice is bringing a touch of Venetian festivity to York.’
    • ‘But above in the hidden gardens of the Kastro, the 14th century fortified Venetian castle above the harbour, there is no rushing or impatience.’
    • ‘We ate a fantastic tuna fish tartar with purée of salt cod, salad of baby scampi and ‘sarde in saor Venetian style’.’
    • ‘It's the tastiest, cheapest and most authentically Venetian way of staving off hunger and fatigue.’
    • ‘The drink is the Bellini, a mixture of white peach juice and sparkling prosecco, named after the fifteenth-century Venetian painter Giovanni Bellini.’
    • ‘Masi, one of the most famous producers in this region, has put Venetian wines on the map.’
    • ‘Special care has been taken to ensure that the new development respects the needs of Venetian life and culture.’
    • ‘Manchester Airport's famous Venetian chandeliers are coming down for good - after dazzling passengers for more than 40 years.’
    • ‘The colour and spectacle of Venetian carnival is coming to York to mark the climax of this year's Early Music Festival.’
    • ‘Watch this space for photos and tales of Venetian waterways, Veronese opera and Dolomitian vistas.’

noun

  • 1A native or citizen of Venice.

    • ‘When they saw what would happen, though, on February 26th, 1453, six of their ships slipped away with one Venetian.’
    • ‘The harbourmaster should then lead the convoy up to Richmond, where the Venetians will moor up by Richmond Bridge Boathouse at 4pm.’
    • ‘Yet another layer of meaning may have been aimed at Venetians who spoke the local dialect.’
    • ‘One must never conspire to kill another Venetian.’
    • ‘The Venetians were the first to introduce coffee to Europe in 1615.’
    • ‘Opera was a 17th century innovation (accredited mainly to Monteverdi), and the Venetians at the time took to it with gusto.’
    • ‘With Xanas we have rarely any lessons and with the Venetians only Psychology and some languages.’
    • ‘But if the Venetians offered Rubens lessons in light and colour, the artists of central Italy - Florence and Rome - held other secrets.’
    • ‘Unlike most Italians, Venetians know how to drink.’
    • ‘I'd no idea that the Venetians were bullfighters.’
    • ‘It was there that the Turkish fleet was destroyed by European forces led by the Venetians, and Cervantes lost an eye.’
    • ‘The Moor, as many Venetians call him, is of strong character.’
    • ‘Modern Greek is essentially Classical Greek as spoken by Venetians.’
    • ‘Routed by the French and Venetians near Milan in 1515, they renounced expansionist policies.’
    • ‘Francesco's attempt on Vicenza, a Venetian client state, gave the Venetians a pretext to invade in 1404.’
    • ‘He has a way with words: the Venetians had a ‘dolphin-like enjoyment’ of paint and really splashed it around.’
    • ‘Grotius' treatise started a war of words, to which the Portuguese, the French, the English, the Spanish and even the Venetians all contributed.’
    • ‘Could this reflect an understanding on the part of the Venetians that these lands represented essential reserve lands for villages?’
    • ‘Yet the Venetians had looted the Quadriga from Constantinople - and Constantinople had probably acquired them by force from Greece.’
    • ‘We're very snobby about European cities, unless the Romans and Venetians left their mark, but to me Benidorm is like a tiny New York.’
    1. 1.1The dialect of Italian spoken in Venice.
      • ‘Loosely translated into Venetian, it meant ‘Prodigal Child.’’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French Venicien, assimilated to medieval Latin Venetianus, from Latin Venetia Venice.

Pronunciation:

Venetian

/vəˈnēSHən/