Definition of VISTA in English:

VISTA

  • Volunteers in Service to America.

Pronunciation:

VISTA

/ˈvistə/

Definition of Vista in English:

Vista

proper noun

  • A city in southwestern California, north of San Diego; population 91,144 (est. 2008)

Pronunciation:

Vista

/ˈvistə/

Definition of vista in English:

vista

noun

  • 1A pleasing view, especially one seen through a long, narrow opening.

    ‘a vista of church spires’
    • ‘You'll find stunning vineyard landscapes and majestic mountain vistas along the way, and if it's harvest time there are feasts and festivals galore.’
    • ‘But don't look for any sublime vistas or sweeping landscapes in this volume.’
    • ‘Of course, it's possible it'll turn out to be a science-lite tour of the solar system with a few special effects adding men in spacesuits to the various spectacular planetary vistas on view.’
    • ‘Each of the hotel's 339 rooms offers a waterfront vista with a panoramic view of Tokyo Bay, made more accessible by large bay windows which partially open to allow a sea breeze.’
    • ‘Some houses had simple geometric designs, while others had vistas of landscapes or intertwining designs of plants and animals.’
    • ‘Travelling out of Adelaide you quickly leave the city behind and before long are into the outback and a relentless landscape of scrub with vistas in which you can lose yourself for hours on end as the train trundles relentlessly north.’
    • ‘The axes, allées, triumphal arches, colonnades, rigidly symmetrical planting and carefully controlled vistas of past landscapes are vivid expressions of domination.’
    • ‘But splendid façades and broad vistas could not mask some of the more tragic results of the rebuilding.’
    • ‘Now they span nearly 150 acres with sweeping lawns and vistas interspersed with statuary, tempiettos, and benches.’
    • ‘Any account of how to spend a day in a city as rich in sights, museums, literary connections, architecture, street life, and splendid vistas as Edinburgh can only scratch the surface.’
    • ‘Splendid vistas of snow-covered countrysides and an interesting shot of a plane landing from the viewpoint of a camera under it also seem planned more to remind us of the widescreen that to advance the story.’
    • ‘Taking less than an hour to traverse Slovenia, the convoy soon finds itself winding through stunning landscapes and vistas of Croatia into the Adriatic port city of Rijeka.’
    • ‘The earth tones of the plants connect this landscape with neighboring vistas of red sandstone formations and juniper forests.’
    • ‘The coastal train took in some splendid vistas, not least the beautiful mountains at the coast at Kaikoura.’
    • ‘The young man's large fur collar and tall black top hat give him the air of a young, carefree European dandy, but undoubtedly the images he is capturing are not those of pristine landscapes and peaceful vistas.’
    • ‘From afar, the mountain vistas and landscape are breathtaking.’
    • ‘Macer also moves the lens fluently through haunting vistas and landscapes, so we get a real rural feeling for New Haven, Springfield and the surrounding areas.’
    • ‘Within the history of Flemish art Bosch was the one who fostered the advent of broad landscape vistas with their own intrinsic importance to the principal subjects of either saints or sinners.’
    • ‘Vermont boasts steepled churches, classic villages, rural landscapes and spectacular vistas unspoiled by billboards, highways or malls.’
    • ‘This removes the foreground from view and treats the landscape as a panoramic vista rather than a visual extension of the interior space.’
    view, prospect, panorama, aspect, perspective, spectacle, sight
    scenery, landscape, seascape, riverscape, townscape, cityscape, snowscape
    outlook
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1A mental view of a succession of remembered or anticipated events.
      ‘vistas of freedom seemed to open ahead of him’
      • ‘In the matter of soloists, great care is taken to engage the best of the new, which means interpretation unfolds with unexpected vistas, some of which are truly magical.’
      • ‘In social life it is a good idea to broaden vistas and friendships.’
      • ‘In the cosmic vistas of Prometheus Unbound, Shelley anticipates space travel.’
      • ‘It also has the potential for opening new vistas for business, leisure and religious tourism in Punjab.’
      • ‘David Lloyd, erstwhile coach of England, was never a natural establishment man, so it is with a detached vista that he has watched events of note unfold at Lord's.’
      • ‘The human figure is reduced to anonymity in the seemingly endless vista of ruin and devastation.’
      • ‘This leap in technology should open new vistas in the study of nuclear structure.’
      • ‘The written deliberately engages pre-existing literary attitudes and vistas, which have the power to take on large, systematic social issues.’
      • ‘The education broadened my vistas and it gave me back the most precious commodity of human existence - and that is hope.’
      • ‘It has opened vistas that I never thought could be associated with writing.’
      • ‘Professional projects are completed and new opportunities present vistas for expansion.’
      • ‘Now the works, though smaller and abstract, seem to contain wide vistas - explosive mental landscapes, if you will.’
      • ‘We're talking about a people - lots of them parents - subjected to an endless vista of death and torture, a country in which freedom can never be won without help from outside.’
      • ‘Schuyler has lost the thread of his thought, the boring vistas of odd jobs, and has allowed himself to take up - perhaps through aesthetic animus - almost a contrary position.’
      • ‘Their astral eyes do not fasten upon small realities but dream of grander vistas.’
      • ‘Through new vistas of business, it was looking at mopping up revenue to become one of the Fortune 500 companies, the Chief Postmaster General of Tamil Nadu circle said.’
      • ‘In war, all sides treat civilians as pawns to all sides, but if the Stevens Report is as anticipated it will open up a vista so appalling that the post war liberal and democratic British state should be shaken to its core.’
      • ‘It aims to raise awareness of the business potential created by this new commercial vista, and to combat some of the misconceptions which perpetuate about doing business with eastern Europe.’
      • ‘This new vista brings different challenges for business, for the world of work and for social partnership.’
      • ‘Your repute and expertise open up new vistas for business expansion.’

Origin

Mid 17th century: from Italian, literally view from visto seen past participle of vedere see from Latin videre.

Pronunciation:

vista

/ˈvistə/