Definition of Sauk in US English:

Sauk

(also Sac)

noun

  • 1A member of a North American people inhabiting parts of the central US, formerly in Wisconsin, Illinois, and Iowa, now in Oklahoma and Kansas.

    • ‘Among the Sauk, shamans were thought to be capable of transforming themselves into bears and other animals to destroy their enemies.’
    • ‘Renewed appreciation for the Sac began in 1991, when a coalition of three museums and an arboretum proposed turning an abandoned gravel quarry and other riverfront land into a 300-acre cultural center - Turtle Bay Exploration Park.’
    • ‘But it was in 1832, when the Sacs and Foxes became restive along the Upper Mississippi and General Scott was making the Army famous for its pacification measures, that the Cavalry really came to the front.’
    • ‘Under Black Hawk, the Sacs and Foxes of Illinois briefly fought back in 1832 but were swiftly overpowered.’
    • ‘The conflict began in April 1832, encouraged by Black Hawk, a Sauk leader, when nearly 2,000 Sauks and Mesquakies crossed the Mississippi River, moving into Illinois.’
  • 2The Algonquian language of the Sauk.

adjective

  • Relating to the Sauk or their language.

    • ‘Born in the village of Saukenuk at the confluence of the Rock and Mississippi Rivers in western Illinois, Black Hawk was respected within Sauk society for his bravery and his conservative views.’
    • ‘The conflict began in April 1832, encouraged by Black Hawk, a Sauk leader, when nearly 2,000 Sauks and Mesquakies crossed the Mississippi River, moving into Illinois.’
    • ‘The Sauk chief was the subject of the well-known paintings of George Catlin and the portrait by John Wesly Jarvis.’
    • ‘In the 1820s and 1830s, the Cherokee, Choctaw, Sac, Fox, Seminole, and Chickasaw nations, deprived of European allies, faced expulsion from the eastern half of the continent.’

Origin

From Canadian French Saki, from Ojibwa osākī.

Pronunciation

Sauk

/sôk/