Main definitions of pod in English

: pod1pod2POD3

pod1

noun

  • 1An elongated seed vessel of a leguminous plant such as the pea, splitting open on both sides when ripe.

    • ‘Place the carrots, cardamom pods and ginger in a saucepan and just cover with chicken stock.’
    • ‘At both harvests the numbers of pegs and pods per plant were counted.’
    • ‘Studies of other aphid species have reported that pods are higher quality plant food than leaves.’
    • ‘Mature pods split in two parts and released winged seeds.’
    • ‘When the pods split open, hordes of seeds, each with their own fluffy parasail, are carried away on the breeze to a new home.’
    • ‘Then the seeds from the pod are planted into a medium solution in small containers.’
    • ‘Late in the season, just as the seedpods begin to split, open a pod and gather the seeds.’
    • ‘It's the customers' burden to strip the plants of pods and shell them of their beans.’
    • ‘Every spring it would blossom and by fall we'd find round, spiky, green pods covering the sidewalk.’
    • ‘After 48 days of growth, the number of flowers, buds, and seed pods on each plant was counted as a measure of the total flower number.’
    • ‘These pods, when still young, are cut into short lengths and used in Indian curry dishes.’
    • ‘The tender young leaves, flowers, and seed pods of this herb are often used in salads.’
    • ‘Break open the cardamom pods, crush the seeds slightly, and add them to the onion mixture with the curry leaves.’
    • ‘Your aim is to allow the rosellas to simmer away gently, so that the flesh separates from the green seedpods without splitting the pods open and releasing the tiny white seeds inside.’
    • ‘In the fall, plants produce and discard gorgeous seeds, seed pods, husks, and pinecones.’
    • ‘They all produce attractive, carefree plants with pods full of seeds that are easily dried and stored.’
    • ‘Pick shelling peas when the pods are fully plump and a fresh green colour.’
    • ‘Split the round pods, soak seed overnight and plant in a small pot of moistened rooting mixture.’
    • ‘The little bird pulled up a pod and peeled back the papery covering.’
    • ‘So I opened each pod one by one, plucking the beans inside.’
    • ‘Put tamarind pods in a small saucepan and barely cover with boiling water.’
    • ‘Overall, plants with many pods fostered high densities of big-eyed bugs, which adversely affected the densities of aphids and most other herbivorous insects.’
    • ‘Shoots were separated into leaves, stem, and flowers and pods.’
    • ‘Needs cool soil to produce flower stalks and pods, so plant early or wait until autumn.’
    shell, husk, hull, case, seed vessel
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The egg case of a locust.
      • ‘The locusts yellow first, within days of releasing their chocolate-colored pods.’
      • ‘Why do they and honey locusts have sugary pods so attractive to livestock?’
    2. 1.2Geology A body of rock or sediment whose length greatly exceeds its other dimensions.
      ‘pods of blue quartz in Virginia’
      • ‘The pods were composed of large masses of black sphalerite containing vugs of petzite on gold, galena, rhodochrosite, chalcopyrite, and pyrite.’
      • ‘Small pods of calcite, on the other hand, occur mainly in the outer portions of the intermediate zone.’
      • ‘I would like to add another element of mystery, though, because my specimen has some crystal ‘rods’ extending through one of the quartz pods.’
    3. 1.3 A narrow-necked purse seine for catching eels.
      • ‘The big rod bag with it's pods, bivvy and bedchair now sits gathering dust.’
      • ‘I then proceeded to set up my rod pod with two optonic heads.’
      • ‘A rod pod may or may not be needed on your chosen water, but it's as well to take one, just in case.’
      • ‘A rod pod can be very useful if hard banks are present but make sure the rod tips are pointed at the lead.’
      • ‘Take a rod pod as the banks are very hard and a brolly or bivvy as the sun can be very strong.’
  • 2often with modifier A detachable or self-contained unit on an aircraft, spacecraft, vehicle, or vessel, having a particular function.

    ‘the torpedo's sensor pod contains a television camera’
    • ‘The unique fuselage pod had additional, if cramped, space for paratroopers, stretchers or freight.’
    • ‘There was one escape pod left, but Justin had no intention of leaving his most prized possession onboard this deathtrap.’
    • ‘We know he was on the station when the explosions started and reports of his escape pod launching were confirmed.’
    • ‘Then with little to no warning other then the escape pods the big ship combusted, thousands of little explosions led up to a massive bang as pieces of the ship sprayed outwards like a star exploding.’
    • ‘Outside the hotel one of the ships saw the escape pod launch.’
    • ‘They felt the pod rock back and forth for a moment and then heard the sound of the hangar doors slide shut.’
    • ‘Its 1,700-pound useful load allows for storage inside the spacious cabin or underneath the fuselage in a cargo pod.’
    • ‘‘I'm getting a heat source at the center of the hatchery,’ said the marine with missile pods.’
    • ‘The helicopter can be armed with two 80 mm rocket pods or two 7.62 mm or 12.7mm guns.’
    • ‘The large armored plates covering all her missile pods incase she took a hit there so the missiles wouldn't explode.’
    • ‘Tankers are fitted with tactical floodlights on the engine pylons, wing pods and the boom area to assist night-time refuelling operations.’
    • ‘The best he could hope for was to land in a lake or that the pod wouldn't break up as badly as most.’
    • ‘The helicopter can be fitted with gun pods, rocket launchers and air-to-air missiles attached to two removable weapons sponsons.’
    • ‘The Carrier and Marine variants can have an external gun pod fitted.’
    • ‘According to the mission requirements, the helicopter can be armed with rockets, bombs and machine gun pods mounted on the weapon pylons on both sides of the fuselage.’
    • ‘It was a pod that was streamlined for speed and 4 thrusters to propel it.’
    • ‘They tried to shoot in reply, to abandon the damaged vessels in escape pods, but could hardly run away from the crushing defeat.’
    • ‘The escape pod rocked from the turbulence created by the shock waves.’
    • ‘At 5: 00 p.m. two life rafts are inflated on the bow, and the aircraft drops a rescue pod.’
    • ‘Right away, he could tell that the vessel had a larger engine pod.’

verb

  • 1no object (of a plant) bear or form pods.

    ‘the peas have failed to pod’
    • ‘Oh, and the broad beans are finally starting to pod, thanks to all the hard work by our neighbourhood bees.’
    • ‘You can buy podded soybeans at supermarkets, but seeds are easy to grow.’
  • 2with object Remove (peas or beans) from their pods prior to cooking.

    • ‘The pleasant task of helping pod the peas for Sunday lunch while eating the odd one on the sly should be part of childhood.’
    • ‘That's Tom, off at the end of the garden podding fresh peas.’
    • ‘I came up through a very strict regime of activities that I had to do to earn my pocket money, such as mowing lawns, picking fruit, feeding the hens, podding peas, top and tailing gooseberries, and collecting pine cones.’
    • ‘Mind you, I was put off peas at an early age myself, when I came face to face with a white grub popping its head out of a pea as I was podding some freshly picked peas…’
    • ‘Most people had bigger families than they do today, and Daisy remembers podding peas for thirteen people.’
    • ‘Helen's father asked them to whistle as they podded the peas.’
    • ‘As the sun set, we'd begin the steady rhythm of the close of our day, my daughter podding the peas for supper, my boyfriend opening a bottle of - what in fact turned out to be - very reasonably priced Finnish beer.’
    • ‘They have persuaded us that if you can only start with a perfect sorrel leaf and a few freshly podded peas, the rest will surely follow.’
    • ‘Podding the peas on Christmas morning was usually a shared chore for the family.’

Origin

Late 17th century: back-formation from dialect podware, podder ‘field crops’, of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

pod

/päd//pɑd/

Main definitions of pod in English

: pod1pod2POD3

pod2

noun

  • A small herd or school of marine animals, especially whales.

    • ‘Marine life - from schools of tiny reef fish to bigger pods of dolphins and whales - teem in the surrounding waters.’
    • ‘On several occasions two of our group got within touching distance (although touching is not allowed) of a pod of pilot whales.’
    • ‘There was a pod of 10 minke whales in the vicinity, indulging in a game of hide-and-seek.’
    • ‘In two decades operating on the banks, Scott has seen three generations of dolphins born, and recognises numerous individual animals within the resident pods.’
    • ‘Wright was on a small boat with a local man, amidst a large pod of whales.’
    • ‘On the journey he encountered many stunning sights including smoking volcanoes, blazing sunrises and pods of whales and dolphins.’
    • ‘The first encounter was in the Red Sea, when a small pod of dolphins passed us just at the edge of visibility.’
    • ‘Once at the top, climbers quickly forget how winded they are when faced with magnificent views of mountains and the frozen sea where seals, penguins and pods of killer whales can be spotted.’
    • ‘The pod of whales included several juveniles, five infants and two male adults trying to protect them.’
    • ‘We take cups of coffee onto the deck to view humpback whales and pods of orcas.’
    • ‘‘There are pods of killer whales that specialize in feeding on herring,’ Batty said.’
    • ‘Explore the rugged coastline of the CabotTrail for inspiring and diverse land and seascapes - watch for pods of whales swimming and bald eagles soaring.’
    • ‘Sperm whales and dolphins normally swim in pods.’
    • ‘Sperm whales swim in family pods in deep water offshore.’
    • ‘We were also joined by a pod of dolphins, audible for much of the dive but visible only at the end when they swam past.’
    • ‘Pilot whales can often be spotted resting in large pods at the ocean surface, yet very little is known about the submarine behavior of these deep-sea hunters.’
    • ‘A pod of whales was reported off Back Beach earlier this week and those quick enough were able to catch a glimpse of them.’
    • ‘Within 10 minutes we were idling towards a pod of six whales making their sedate way through the wide sweep of the sound opposite the lodge.’
    • ‘For one thing, their slow motion doesn't startle sea life, such as the pods of whales that sometimes splash alongside.’
    • ‘When a pod of whales beach themselves on the coast, the tribespeople try everything in their power to push the beasts back to the safety of the ocean.’

Origin

Mid 19th century (originally US): of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

pod

/päd//pɑd/

Main definitions of pod in English

: pod1pod2POD3

POD3

noun

  • ‘POD enables publishers to take chances with authors’
    short for print-on-demand
    • ‘I'm hoping this will lead to other unfinished TP titles getting POD status.’
    • ‘The concept of POD itself is not new in the Digital World.’
    • ‘"Self-publishing print is expensive and a lot of work," although, he adds, they would have offered POD editions through the Espresso Book Machine.’
    • ‘Her post not only points toward a bright future for print-on-demand (POD) publishing, but also highlights the benefits for brick-and-mortar bookstores and self-publishing authors.’
    • ‘Using POD it's affordable to even print a single copy.’