Main definitions of pal in English

: pal1PAL2

pal1

noun

informal
  • 1A friend.

    ‘we're best pals’
    • ‘We had so many pals and friends through art school that we usually got a good turnout anyway.’
    • ‘When she started to improve, her pals decided to treat her to a night out.’
    • ‘Other pals chummed him along the first stretch from Milngavie and his dad kept him company yesterday.’
    • ‘Your child may be great friends with someone one day, then best pals with somebody else the next.’
    • ‘School pals and teachers were highly delighted and all wish her well in the final rally.’
    • ‘She never saw her school pals, who sent her video messages and letters of comfort.’
    • ‘He and pals later moved on to a bar in the Quay Street area of the city.’
    • ‘You are likely to get trustworthy pals, while some others may go for a new vehicle.’
    • ‘But he is confident his old pals will do the business and launch the club into Division One.’
    • ‘They took the triplets into school and Megan enjoyed showing them off to her pals.’
    • ‘While Henry may have failed to taste true European glory with Leeds, he at least had a whiff of it, he tells pals.’
    • ‘Six of his pals were also given a ticking-off by police officers but they were allowed to make the journey.’
    • ‘It offers visitors an opportunity to find new pals to enjoy a drink with, and maybe some conversation too.’
    • ‘They became good pals and discovered that they all had a strong interest in music.’
    • ‘The pair became party pals and were spotted in some of the Welsh capital's trendiest nightspots.’
    • ‘Not only am I thinking of buying from friends but my lawyer is one of my best pals too.’
    • ‘A few people turned up, but to be honest, I had no idea if any of them were my former school pals or not.’
    • ‘The next few days will be a series of frenzied meetings with pals, with former employers and old friends.’
    • ‘The pair, both aged 21, had been pals for six years and had a mutual love of cars.’
    • ‘He already has a fan club in the shape of his family, who cheered him on in the studio, and school pals.’
    friend, companion, comrade, intimate, familiar, confidant, alter ego, second self
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Used as a form of address, especially to indicate anger or aggression.
      ‘back off, pal’
      • ‘Paramedics have been asked by bosses not to call people duck, pal, love or mate for fear of causing offence.’
      • ‘This is one of those bars where lads who used to be bad boys drink and the staff call you pal, not sir.’
      • ‘I also remember you said you would be coming along on that little road trip too, pal.’
      • ‘Are you going to races all your life or are you going to finally get in the race, pal?’
      • ‘In other words, you try to take what's mine, pal, and I'm going to stop you with the best means available.’
      • ‘This is Southern California, pal, where physical imperfection will NOT be tolerated.’
      man, my friend
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verb

[NO OBJECT]pal around
informal
  • Spend time with a friend.

    ‘we got acquainted but we never really palled around’
    • ‘Once there, things go from lousy to worse as Emily starts staring blankly into the surrounding woods and palling around with a sinister invisible friend called Charlie.’
    • ‘. Of course palling around with him meant doing untold quantities of drugs, which the story makes clear was part of his downfall.’
    • ‘I've never really palled around with anybody that does what I do.’
    • ‘The cheetah and raccoon didn't normally pal around together, but they had shared a cab from their hotel to the same area of town.’
    • ‘Yet he refuses to buy into the theory that his lack of production has anything to do with the injury to his close friend, who lived in the same condo complex as Sundin in Toronto and often palled around together.’
    • ‘He explains: ‘Paddy was working on the railway at the time in Portlaoise and we palled around together.’’
    • ‘It's not like he pals around and makes sundry business deals with convicted felons.’
    • ‘It would be good for you to find a study partner, especially one that you can pal around with from a public school.’
    • ‘Although she doesn't spend much time in North America - Europe seems to be hogging her - Heather pals around with all the big names.’
    • ‘As a youth, I was a friendly soul, palling around with all and sundry.’
    • ‘It is dangerous for economists to expand into measuring happiness among ‘potential smokers’ and other groups, given the profession's penchant for palling around with legislators and bureaucrats.’
    • ‘This is where you pal around with your friend or friends and just have fun.’
    • ‘The one drawback are the cheesy moments of him palling around with his cutesy kids.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, Simone pals around with the local bad boy with a heart of gold, who takes her for rides on the back of his motorcycle and buys her expensive diamond necklaces she can't see.’
    • ‘Get a profile up online that's sexy, forward, funny and easy on the self-deprecation - one where there is clearly no room for just palling around.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, she has been conspicuously palling around with a billionaire.’
    mix, keep company, mingle, socialize, get together, go around, rub shoulders, fraternize, consort, have dealings
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 17th century: from Romany, ‘brother, mate’, based on Sanskrit bhrātṛ ‘brother’.

Pronunciation

pal

/pal//pæl/

Main definitions of pal in English

: pal1PAL2

PAL2

noun

  • The television broadcasting system used in most of Europe.

Origin

Acronym from Phase Alternate Line (so named because the color information in alternate lines is inverted in phase).

Pronunciation

PAL

/pæl//pal/