Main definitions of neat in English

: neat1neat2NEAT3

neat1

adjective

  • 1(of a place or thing) arranged in an orderly, tidy way.

    ‘the books had been stacked up in neat piles’
    • ‘"Wow, your room is so neat, " Hannah said.’
    • ‘She absent-mindedly made a neat pile of the scattered magazines on the coffee table.’
    • ‘Shirt upon shirt, all stacked in neat piles - had they been ironed?’
    • ‘Several long and narrow tables were arranged in neat rows, teachers scouting the premises between them.’
    • ‘The village was neat, with tidy little houses, arranged along three roads leading out from this castle.’
    • ‘Choosing one, he stepped inside a little room almost militarily neat, and masculine in aura.’
    • ‘In fact, salt crystals are formed by the very neat and orderly arrangement of alternating sodium and chloride ions.’
    • ‘The sergeant counted the money onto the kitchen table, note by note, arranging it in neat piles.’
    • ‘In Mexico, the tops of the wooden posts are cut off at the same level, creating very neat and tidy fences.’
    • ‘Many thanks to everyone who came out to help keep all areas around the river so neat and tidy.’
    • ‘We travel down from Newcastle and Durban twice a year in order to keep the graves neat and tidy.’
    • ‘Zack opened the door to his room and Ana looked around, he kept everything so neat.’
    • ‘As he began shuffling his papers so they were neat and organized, whispers began to fly around the class.’
    • ‘And when the City asked them to leave the sidewalk outside, they asked for an extra allotment of time, in order to be able to leave the site as neat and tidy as they found it.’
    • ‘Megan laughed, " Ya know, you should thank me for keeping my locker so neat.’
    • ‘There were three chairs arranged in a neat semi-circle, with a coffee table in the center.’
    • ‘It was just how I left it, neat and tidy; everything was in perfect order.’
    • ‘A key feature of the farm is the farmhouse and farmyard which is well laid out and always maintained in a very neat and tidy fashion.’
    • ‘The place is neat and tidy with not a weed in sight.’
    • ‘Everything about the room was neat and orderly.’
    • ‘"Over the years the residents have made a great effort to keep the estate very neat and tidy.’
    tidy, neat and tidy, as neat as a new pin, orderly, well ordered, in order, in good order, well kept, shipshape, shipshape and bristol fashion, in apple-pie order, immaculate, spick and span, uncluttered, straight, trim, spruce
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    1. 1.1 (of a person) habitually tidy, well groomed, or well organized.
      ‘her daughter was always neat and clean’
      • ‘Now, yes, he's neat and clean, but I don't think that's a fault.’
      • ‘Or again, he was an amazingly neat gardener, one might almost say a perfectionist.’
      • ‘Not to say that we weren't neat and polite at the table.’
      • ‘There were clothes everywhere and that was unusual seeing as she was a very neat person.’
      • ‘But unless you're particularly neat and tidy, they can soon end up rolling around the floor, or getting sat on by a passenger.’
      • ‘Maybe she was just a neat person, and it was a summer assignment, and she wanted everything to be organized, so she had tucked it away.’
      • ‘Obsessively neat people should not consider owning companion birds.’
      • ‘Aberdeen gave the ball away far too often to be able to mount any sustained pressure, whilst the visitors were neat and tidy in their play.’
      • ‘I an a very neat person, and I don't want you to see my place in a state.’
      • ‘He was neat and dapper when I saw him in 1995 in Kansas City, where he was filming the movie of that name.’
      • ‘There is nothing wrong with being a slob until you start complaining all the time that you wish you were neat and organized.’
      • ‘And doesn't such an organized and neat man deserve to be indicted just for making us all look bad?’
      • ‘But I know many children of less than neat parents who rebel by aggressively keeping house.’
      • ‘She's neat, serious and always over-prepared; he's a jokey slob who flies by the seat of his rumpled pants.’
      • ‘Walking down the aisle, looking impeccably neat in his uniform was Bob.’
      • ‘I was neat, clean, shaved and sober, and I didn't care who knew it.’
      • ‘I can get my daughter to clean her room by setting up comparison/competition images with her neat friend, Amanda.’
      • ‘Madge herself is immaculate - a tiny, neat woman whom grief has made two-dimensional.’
      • ‘He was extremely neat and tidy around the place and took a gentle pride in maintaining the place so well.’
      • ‘She's neat, organised, intelligent, motivated, good natured and talented across all arenas.’
      smart, spruce, dapper, trim, well groomed, well turned out, besuited
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    2. 1.2 Having a pleasing shape or appearance; well formed or regular.
      ‘Alan noted down the orders in his neat, precise script’
      • ‘She is in her early twenties, but serious, tiny, and very neat in appearance.’
      • ‘The other two were written in the same neat script.’
      • ‘Ancient runes were patterned in neat, flowing script, words that had not been read in many years.’
      • ‘This autumn the emphasis is on neat, elegant tailoring and waist-cinched silhouettes.’
      • ‘She wore a simple, neat white robe with blue trim and sleeves so broad they looked like wings.’
      • ‘There, scrawled in Dylan's somehow neat handwriting, is a single word.’
      • ‘These wooden storage drawers provide a neat appearance and are more functional than an entry table.’
      • ‘It suggested a forger might have selected a relatively smooth area of the back as a place to carve the small, neat characters.’
      • ‘"Real men don't have hair that neat, " one radio journalist said.’
      • ‘I picked up my little card. ‘Miss Amber Sutton’ it said in neat, cursive silver letters.’
      • ‘He has finally, it seems, sorted out his blog format, and everything looks fabulously neat and tidy.’
      • ‘This will give the neat, crisp, appearance that the standard combat uniform is expected to have.’
      • ‘Woven garments, such as shirts and trousers, should be folded along their natural creases to maintain a neat appearance.’
      • ‘The Virgo style is neat, discreet, simple, conservative and under-stated.’
      • ‘I recognized my mothers abnormally neat handwriting at once and I began to read.’
      • ‘Not only did these materials present a neat appearance, but their flexibility allowed them to be used around curvilinear and geometric beds.’
      • ‘The center console is neat and simple, stressing a less-is-more minimalism.’
      • ‘The words " For Cecil " were written in extremely neat handwriting on it.’
      • ‘However, for gardeners who prefer rather more order in their garden, this type of cotoneaster is perfect for training into a neat fan shape.’
      • ‘Simple and neat choreography seemed to be Sushmita's motto for the jatis and the dancers executed her vision with clarity.’
      • ‘Look out for a pair of neat black or grey flannel trousers or a pencil or A-line skirt.’
      • ‘Val was a good lawman but not exactly noted for his neat appearance nor his generosity with his money.’
      • ‘The quality of the photography is complemented by a simple, neat site design which does an exemplary job of displaying the collection cleanly and quickly.’
      well formed, regular, precise, crisp, clean-cut, elegant, well proportioned, simple, unadorned, unornamented
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  • 2Done with or demonstrating skill or efficiency.

    ‘Howard's neat, precise tackling’
    • ‘‘It is a very neat, environmentally-friendly solution,’ says Dr Reeder.’
    • ‘Calderon, an attacking midfielder, displayed some neat touches and demonstrated a willingness to run at defenders.’
    • ‘I thought it was a neat bit of conscious self-reference.’
    • ‘All in all, it was a neat move: In order to teach us to value our imaginations, he always let us know what was imaginary and what was not.’
    • ‘I'm sure that I could never have written such a neat bit of syntactical plotting.’
    • ‘The economist who raised the subject has found a neat solution to all these problems.’
    • ‘Folding them together was a pretty neat trick, and it has been done without a wrinkle or seam showing.’
    • ‘The look was relaxed, and the illusion hemlines, also achieved with stripes and shiny fabrics, were a neat way to make clothes appear longer.’
    • ‘If you're determined to see both of those realities as a problem, you can turn to science to provide you with what you'll probably consider a relatively neat solution to the first.’
    • ‘But that's a pretty neat trick to pull that off, two different girls.’
    • ‘At the moment we don't have a neat solution to the problem and it really is stretching staff and eroding morale.’
    • ‘The sampling trick is very neat, and does appear magical even after you see the proof.’
    • ‘It's a neat bit of arithmetic - one beach for each day of the year - but has anyone actually counted them?’
    • ‘Now if that seems like a pretty neat trick, be warned.’
    • ‘This was a neat bit of satire, making the impossibility of the situation immediately obvious.’
    • ‘Admittedly, it is a rather neat effect to use, but not when it appears on nearly every track.’
    • ‘The Government came up, through the ministry, with a very neat solution.’
    • ‘Perhaps there is some neat technical solution, though as yet that doesn't seem to be the case.’
    • ‘So a neat solution is to put an inexpensive hard drive into the printer to receive the print job and keep these large files off the network.’
    • ‘This one is as neat a demonstration of the Arthurian cycle as any book in the Clarke canon, and as stimulating.’
    • ‘Some common-sense solutions, and neat statistics, are found within the paper.’
    • ‘Justin made a neat recovery and with agile steps, he circled the demon, wrapping the silver thread around its throat.’
    skilful, deft, dexterous, adroit, adept, expert, practised, accurate, precise, nimble, agile, graceful, stylish
    clever, ingenious, inventive, resourceful, good, apt, efficient
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    1. 2.1 Tending to disregard specifics for the sake of convenience; slick or facile.
      ‘this neat division does not take into account a host of associated factors’
      • ‘He instilled in me a desire for clarity, but also a suspicion of neat solutions because, he felt, posing problems was more interesting than solving them.’
      • ‘This is a problem that does not lend itself to neat political solutions, for all the righteous indignation inspired by rogue companies like Enron.’
      • ‘With regard to gender, these associations meant that they appeared to resist neat definitions.’
      • ‘You seem to have moved from a neat engineer's view of the world to a view which accepts and celebrates the complexity out there.’
      • ‘But just because the Jungian interpretation is neat & tidy and easy to swallow, doesn't necessarily mean it's accurate.’
      • ‘He measures pain and capacity to suffer in neat units and disregards old-fangled notions such as species or emotion.’
      • ‘The medieval holy wars in the Middle East could not be solved by rational treatises or neat territorial solutions.’
      • ‘It's not necessarily all that neat and simple, is it?’
      • ‘There's no honour and no nice neat solution in pretending otherwise.’
      • ‘This historical framework keeps things pretty clear, although its neat divisions, both chronological and thematic are more imagined than real.’
      • ‘The book does not offer easy answers or neat endings.’
      • ‘Like most three-part sermons, Delbanco's division is a bit too neat.’
      • ‘As we can see now, musical evolution doesn't conform conveniently to neat historical divisions of style and chronology; boundaries are regularly blurred.’
      • ‘The authors also note that the public perception of crime appears to have ‘no neat relationship’ with the crime rate.’
      • ‘Despite a very beautiful closing shot, the ending was rather conventional and perhaps too neat - the family was reunited and harmony restored.’
      • ‘Perhaps this is a subtle statement on the unglamorous reality of commercialised sex, but the witty script resists such neat categorisations.’
      • ‘We prefer to live in a neat moral universe, and so we simplify, even to ourselves.’
      • ‘That's a problem, since Kerry does not conveniently fit into any neat political cubbyhole.’
      • ‘This reveals the fact that the issues that apply to pre-contact cultures cannot be defined into any neat and efficient concept or word.’
      • ‘No doubt there's some truth to that, but it looks too neat.’
  • 3(of liquid, especially liquor) not diluted or mixed with anything else.

    ‘he drank neat Scotch’
    • ‘Sponge the woolly bits with neat washing-up liquid, suggests a reader who says her father used to deal with greenfly on his roses in this way.’
    • ‘But when it comes to adult conversation and emotional and practical support, emailing two old friends is like drinking lemonade when what you really need is a neat whisky.’
    • ‘Drink them neat or drink them with lots of water.’
    • ‘Try some of these - but drink them neat.’
    • ‘The Raki is like Ouzo or Ricard (try it neat as well as with water) and goes well with the food.’
    • ‘Next week - Tara parachutes into a Siberian bear-trappers get-together, joining them all for a quick drink of three pints of neat vodka.’
    • ‘It was 7pm and the night was still young, yet the three people sitting next to me were so keen to get their evening started that they were already each drinking from their own litre bottle of neat vodka.’
    • ‘Lace half a bottle of neat spirits with a powerful horse laxative and leave it in the glove box or a prominent place in your home.’
    • ‘Put five drops of the neat oil on a dry, cold compress and cover the burn.’
    • ‘He also points to a fondness for strong drink taken neat; whisky and vodka rather than English ale or Irish stout.’
    • ‘We'd still end up drinking neat vodka and dancing on the table at four in the morning, but I couldn't shake off the suspicion that they had moved off towards adulthood without me.’
    • ‘This is where Dylan Thomas drank 18 neat whiskies, his last.’
    • ‘The meal is a full Russian spread, and in between the different courses shots of neat vodka are served.’
    • ‘And I followed that with a large shot of neat single malt whisky.’
    • ‘To relieve the irritation of an insect bite itch, apply neat apple cider vinegar to the itchy spot, or add 500 ml of apple cider vinegar to a warm bath and soak in it.’
    • ‘For persistent cases, paint with neat lavender oil.’
    • ‘So after you serve a Martini or Scotch, neat, return moments later with a glass of water.’
    • ‘The young lad behind the bar poured him half a pint of neat whiskey!’
    • ‘Among tequila connoisseurs, the best anejo tequilas rank with the finest cognacs and are often consumed neat from a snifter.’
    • ‘These kids are not just drinking little cans of beer - they are drinking bottles of vodka, neat.’
    • ‘Put a few drops of neat tea tree oil in a bowl of hot water, stick a towel over your head and breathe deeply for a few minutes.’
    • ‘And you could never drink it neat unless you wanted to burn a hole in the lining of your stomach.’
    undiluted, straight, unmixed, unadulterated, unblended, pure, uncut
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  • 4North American informal Very good or pleasant; excellent.

    ‘it was really neat seeing the city’
    • ‘Yet, it's neat to see if I can try to pick up any Japanese.’
    • ‘She is a neat lady and I feel lucky to have her as a friend.’
    • ‘I thought all the neat people lived inside the internet.’
    • ‘Everyone was kind of reeling at the neologism but for me it sounded neat.’
    • ‘And you know what is neat, Lou, so far it appears to be working.’
    • ‘What a great skill to have and what a neat idea that it's been revived!’
    • ‘My mother and Lindsey have this really neat relationship.’
    • ‘How fortunate we are to be in the center of the exciting geometric growth of this new industry, with such neat people sharing the experience.’
    • ‘But don't take that to mean that I'm busy all the time - I'm keen as ever to see as many neat people as possible.’
    • ‘"I know, but I thought it would sound neat, " Moe mumbled.’
    • ‘They're both really neat people - I'm pleased to have made a connection there, and I hope we keep in touch.’
    • ‘Incidentally, the Donna Summer homepage is really neat, albeit horrendously designed.’
    • ‘But it is kind of neat to see how my style had developed over time!’
    • ‘One of the really neat things about conventional wisdom is that sometimes it's true.’
    • ‘There are lots of little shops that have really neat stuff in them.’
    • ‘And I know, lots of neat people meet on dating services.’
    • ‘So, I invited this really neat guy whom I've been dating for the past three months.’
    • ‘I think Wink is a very cool place and our technology is really neat.’
    • ‘Then realize that there are lots of other really neat guys out there, and someday you might love one of them instead.’

Origin

Late 15th century (in the sense ‘clean, free from impurities’): from French net, from Latin nitidus ‘shining’, from nitere ‘to shine’; related to net. The sense ‘bright’ (now obsolete) was recorded in English in the late 16th century.

Pronunciation

neat

/nēt//nit/

Main definitions of neat in English

: neat1neat2NEAT3

neat2

noun

archaic
  • 1A bovine animal.

    • ‘"as proper a man as ever trod upon neat's leather" [Julius Caesar, Scene 1]’
    • ‘I had a pretty dinner for them, viz. a brace of stewed carp, six roast chickens and a jowl of hot salmon for the first course; a tanzy and two neats' tongues and cheese second.’
    1. 1.1 Cattle.

Origin

Old English, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch noot, also to the base of dialect nait meaning ‘companion’.

Pronunciation

neat

/nēt//nit/

Main definitions of neat in English

: neat1neat2NEAT3

NEAT3

  • Non-exercise activity thermogenesis (the energy expended during normal daily activity rather than through an exercise program)

    • ‘The researchers have termed this type of movement NEAT (non-exercise activity thermogenesis) and estimate that it zaps an additional 300 to 800 calories a day.’
    • ‘The researchers believe the discovery of the strong effects of NEAT on obesity could make a big difference in helping people beat the condition.’
    • ‘The new study measured the NEAT levels of 20 self-proclaimed couch potatoes, half of whom were obese.’
    • ‘Low NEAT, he says, most likely reflects genetic differences, because his study showed that even after obese people lose weight, they are still inclined to sit for the same amount of time.’
    • ‘"Unlike running a marathon, NEAT is within the reach of everyone."’

Pronunciation

NEAT

/nēt/