Definition of Monday in US English:

Monday

noun

  • The day of the week before Tuesday and following Sunday.

    ‘I saw him on Monday’
    ‘the Monday before last’
    as modifier ‘Monday morning’
    • ‘It was not much of a day, either, a dull Monday morning but at least it wasn't raining.’
    • ‘By Monday morning four or five families had still not been able to move back into their homes.’
    • ‘Imagine, life with no boring Sundays or dreary Mondays.’
    • ‘I started the work at half ten on Sunday night and finished at one on Monday morning.’
    • ‘The show's transfer to Sunday from its Monday night slot is a testimony to its success.’
    • ‘On the Monday morning I went to the bank to pay the money in, and realised that it was not in my purse or my bag.’
    • ‘During school term time, the farm is closed on Mondays and Tuesdays.’
    • ‘Philippa returned to hospital on Monday of last week and she died on Wednesday morning.’
    • ‘When they took the register on Monday morning, there were a number of notable absences.’
    • ‘I have seen him walk away from the manager's job only for him to still be there on the Monday morning.’
    • ‘All three occupants of the Astor residence had a late start to their Monday morning.’
    • ‘Back at the factories, the Monday morning after a win is always something special.’
    • ‘He and the other man were alone in the gallery in the middle of a sunny Monday morning.’
    • ‘The lake digger was also due on the following Monday to dig two canal lakes and another lake.’
    • ‘He carefully limped into work on the Monday morning and deliberately slipped on the oil.’
    • ‘So, on Monday evening it began to snow, and by Tuesday there were a couple of inches.’
    • ‘The sun was shining early on Monday morning so we decided to take Lucy for a walk over the road.’
    • ‘On Monday, he announced that his firm would go public with a flotation next year.’
    • ‘On Monday, the service will be handing out leaflets showing people how they can help.’
    • ‘The next day she learned she would be suspended the following Monday, for one day.’

Our names for days of the week are based on translations of Latin terms: days of the week in ancient Rome were named after the planets, a category which at that time was considered to include the moon and the sun (after which Sunday was named)

adverb

North American
  • 1On Monday.

    ‘I'll call you Monday’
    1. 1.1Mondays On Mondays; each Monday.
      ‘the restaurant is closed Mondays’
      • ‘There will be no performances of either show Mondays or on Sunday, July 14.’
      • ‘It's a pain because the only day I can get in is a Monday, and Mondays and Fridays they are closed.’
      • ‘That is why it is used on traditionally bad or slow news days such as Mondays.’
      • ‘Sundays I was always a little unstable, and then Mondays I spent recuperating by my lonesome.’
      • ‘I mean, Mondays you have just started the oppressive boredom, so you have a lot to talk about.’

Our names for days of the week are based on translations of Latin terms: days of the week in ancient Rome were named after the planets, a category which at that time was considered to include the moon and the sun (after which Sunday was named)

Origin

Old English Mōnandæg ‘day of the moon’, translation of late Latin lunae dies; compare with Dutch maandag and German Montag.

Pronunciation