Main definitions of mac in English

: mac1mac2Mac3

mac1

noun

informal
  • Macaroni.

    ‘his daily yearning for mac and cheese’
    • ‘It's time to stop pretending that yesterday's mac and cheese with a squirt of ketchup qualifies as a healthy meal.’
    • ‘It's the return of mac 'n' cheese and grilled cheese, especially in fine restaurants.’
    • ‘Many of us reach for comfort foods or something with milk like mac and cheese in the winter and ice-cream or milkshakes in the summer.’
    • ‘Do you break down cereal boxes, pasta, mac & cheese, and frozen dinner boxes for recycling or do they go in the trash?’
    • ‘Not everyone considers bland 1950s fare (mac and cheese, chicken noodle soup, my mom's meatloaf) comfort food.’
    • ‘Happy hunting and remember that sometimes there really is no replacement for mac and cheese.’
    • ‘If you're preparing mac and cheese from scratch, use whole-wheat pasta and you'll double the fiber.’
    • ‘I found this to be not only strange, but upsetting to my stomach as I'd just eaten some tuna mac 'n' cheese and a Rolling Rock beer.’
    • ‘You'll be back to mac and cheese in front of the TV soon enough.’
    • ‘I used to love getting lunch in the cafeteria, but ever since the new manager took over they stopped serving hamburgers and mac and cheese.’
    • ‘Just what I expected - a good-tasting chili mac.’
    • ‘You'll use the technique for making this sauce over and over, for everything from mac 'n' cheese to Alfredo sauce.’
    • ‘Whether it's spaghetti, pork lo mein, or mac and cheese, the masses just can't get enough of them.’
    • ‘Even mac 'n' cheese has gained new dignity.’
    • ‘Open a can and eat them in place of other high-carb sides like mashed or baked potatoes, biscuits, pasta, or mac and cheese.’
    • ‘Anyone up for homemade mac 'n' cheese?’
    • ‘I won't pretend that my problem is solved and that Easter dinner will see me contentedly grazing on carrot sticks and steamed fish while everyone else devours baked ham, fried chicken and mac and cheese.’
    • ‘For instance, a parent might have to prepare two different meals - a low-fat dinner for himself and good old mac and cheese for the kids.’
    • ‘Chowing down on the foods your mama used to make - like mashed potatoes or mac and cheese - can make you feel as warm and soft as those goodies, which may help you catch a few more winks.’
    • ‘Instead, we ate potato chips, drank three bottles of red wine, finished off the rum, made lots of mac and cheese and sweated in the billion-degree heat.’

Origin

1930s: abbreviation.

Pronunciation

mac

/mak//mæk/

Main definitions of mac in English

: mac1mac2Mac3

mac2

(North American mack)

noun

British
informal
  • A mackintosh.

    • ‘And the finale complete with yellow macs, umbrellas and of course - rain - was well worth waiting for.’
    • ‘The chorus is made up of love's losers - life's trainspotters, who wear macs and binoculars and narrate this tale.’
    • ‘It all began with the return of the mac last year when simple, A-line waterproofs became all the rage.’
    • ‘Those planning to go to Blackpool or North Wales for the bank holiday are most likely to need their macs and umbrellas with the coast and hills favourites for a shower.’
    • ‘Would-be commandos are deployed in groups of up to six, each kitted out in drab macs, assigned a specific target to track down and led into the isolation of a fabric tent.’
    • ‘This can only mean that Martine McCutcheon must own a Burberry mac too, hence minus points.’
    • ‘There probably won't be a single mac or trilby hat in sight at the Novotel on Saturday, he said.’
    • ‘The audience is made to feel like a bunch of Peeping Toms, leering grimly through the upturned collars of their grubby macs into the love lives of the rich and famous.’
    • ‘But that led to problems on the shoplifting front; you see, the macs were behind the counter.’
    • ‘Because of the rain I've had to wear it with my Burberry mac, but it goes with it, so all is not lost.’
    • ‘The mood is all about luxury, from fine touch cashmere and belted suede shirt dresses to candy coloured silk mix macs and cropped band box smart jackets.’
    • ‘However, plastic macs are on sale at the shop - a comfort that was denied the poor old groundlings of 1599.’
    • ‘RACHEL WEISZ skips into the cafe like someone from a Seventies perfume ad, with her belted mac and tweed cap and tumbling raven curls.’
    • ‘That's only just enough time to round up the gear and the children, find fleeces and macs and wellingtons, and get everyone into the car.’
    • ‘But you can arm yourself with umbrellas and macs to keep the rain away.’
    • ‘In wellies and rustling macs around 1,500 spectators arrived at Saturday's Lowick Show, matching last year's crowd that took to the showfield in sunnier climes.’
    • ‘Also decaying is the seaside town, evoked by changeable weather, plastic macs, ice-cream parlours and ‘folk’ entertainers.’
    • ‘We thought fast food was what you have in Lent, a big mac was an oversize raincoat, and crumpet we had for tea.’
    • ‘I'm sure people have this perception that it's all creepy old guys in rain macs - but it's not.’
    • ‘Although we are always going to get visitors who wear those hideous yellow rain macs, we do have visitors who are stylish and we want to encourage more of them.’

Origin

Early 20th century: abbreviation.

Pronunciation

mac

/mak//mæk/

Main definitions of mac in English

: mac1mac2Mac3

Mac3

noun

trademark
  • A type of personal computer.

    • ‘During this time, your old Mac remains a valuable backup resource.’
    • ‘Lest everyone think me a Luddite, I ordered my first Mac in January 1984.’
    • ‘I have been developing software for the Mac for over 20 years.’
    • ‘The appeal of a low cost Mac isn't hard to see.’
    • ‘Choosing not to develop for the Mac, then, is choosing for your company to eventually die.’

Origin

1980s: from Macintosh, the brand name of a range of computers manufactured by Apple Inc.; the range was named after a variety of dessert apple (see McIntosh).

Pronunciation

Mac

/mak//mæk/

noun

North American
informal
  • A form of address for a man whose name is unknown to the speaker.

    • ‘Hey Mac, I need a favor!’
    • ‘Hey Mac, you're going home!’
    man, my friend
    View synonyms

Origin

Early 17th century (originally a form of address to a Scotsman): from Mac-, a patronymic prefix in many Scots and Irish surnames.