Definition of Hector in English:

Hector

proper noun

Greek Mythology
  • A Trojan warrior, son of Priam and Hecuba and husband of Andromache. He was killed by Achilles, who dragged his body behind his chariot three times around the walls of Troy.

Pronunciation:

Hector

/ˈhektər/

Definition of hector in English:

hector

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Talk to (someone) in a bullying way.

    ‘she doesn't hector us about giving up things’
    ‘a brusque, hectoring manner’
    • ‘And for this reason she hectored him knowing how difficult and balky he tended to be, especially towards her.’
    • ‘He avoids moralising and hectoring his readers, going instead for strong uncomplicated identification with his leading character.’
    • ‘In spite of serious differences, nations should approach their problems with the basic temper of peace and not in a threatening and hectoring mood.’
    • ‘Like a blustering, hectoring aunt at a family gathering, he won't be missed by most.’
    • ‘Fair enough - if listening to him hectoring us about scarce resources and carbon emissions is what it takes to conserve the planet then it's a price worth paying.’
    • ‘Far from hectoring us about the greenhouse effect, the work evokes a kind of polluted beauty - or beauty in pollution - akin to seeing a rainbow in a pool of oil.’
    • ‘You can't believe how many young people dressed up as thistles or Proust hectored you in the streets.’
    • ‘Swett also hectored Smith for voting for a Senate pay raise after promising not to do so.’
    • ‘I was hectored for buying into such ‘conspiracy theories.’’
    • ‘It continually baffles me why anyone with such an obvious interest in weblog usability would continually hector their poor readers with the kind of interminable prose that you do.’
    • ‘But commandeering my computer for an entire week in order to hector me into giving them more personal information is unconscionable.’
    • ‘In this situation, the solution to full trains is apparently to hector people not to get on; the solution to full platforms is to stop people getting down to the platform; the solution to crowded stations is to close the station.’
    • ‘There's even hope for losers, four of whom hectored him to the point where he let them participate for $450 each, far below Ronnie's cost.’
    • ‘He never used important names to get his way or hectored people on their behalf.’
    • ‘These people form political groupings, accept positions in the Government or candidacies in the parties - both conceded in order to seduce us - and they hector us to take part in elections.’
    • ‘One can do a fair bit of damage energetically hectoring someone to speak them, but perhaps just as much damage by pretending they don't exist.’
    • ‘I am hectored by this stark materialist warning each time I start typing something to post when supposedly at work.’
    • ‘Preston just hectors boring people without saying anything particularly interesting.’
    • ‘Indeed, we've come a long way from the ‘responsibility era’ that Junior has been hectoring us about for the last four years.’
    • ‘But the guy continued hectoring me to watch more episodes so that I might become enlightened and see the error of my ways.’
    bully, intimidate, browbeat, cow, badger, chivvy, harass, torment, plague
    coerce, pressurize, strong-arm, threaten, menace, ride roughshod over, use strong-arm tactics on, dragoon
    bulldoze, railroad, steamroller
    bullyrag
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: from the Greek name Hector. Originally denoting a hero, the sense later became braggart or bully (applied in the late 17th century to a member of a gang of youths in London, England), hence talk to in a bullying way.

Pronunciation:

hector

/ˈhektər/