Definition of Fatimid in English:

Fatimid

noun

  • A member of a dynasty which ruled in parts of northern Africa, Egypt, and Syria from 909 to 1171, and founded Cairo as its capital in 969.

    • ‘In revenge, the Fatimids sent thousands of Arab tribesmen to lay waste the country.’
    • ‘This marks the beginning of the Fatimid dynasty, which eventually was based at Cairo, though the Fatimids conquered much of North Africa as well.’
    • ‘Founded by the Fatimids in 969; Fatimid Cairo contains al-Azhar, the renowned Islamic university.’
    • ‘In particular, they wanted to take Jerusalem, the city of Jesus Christ, away from the Islamic Fatimids who were ruling it.’
    • ‘The Fatimids in Egypt were falling apart in the 1150s.’

adjective

  • Relating to the Fatimids.

    • ‘The architecture is Fatimid, bearing resemblance to buildings in Cairo.’
    • ‘Cairo is an unequalled treasure house of Islamic architecture displaying distinguished Mameluke, Ottoman and Fatimid edifices.’
    • ‘A prolific writer, al-Kirmani was one of the most learned Ismaili theologians of the Fatimid times.’
    • ‘He came to Egypt in 1168 as an assistant to his uncle, who was a general and then became the vizier of the last Fatimid caliph.’
    • ‘Local administration continued with little change, and the country's prosperity is reflected in the richness of Fatimid art and architecture.’

Origin

From Arabic Fāṭima (see Fatima, from whom the dynasty is said to descend) + -id.

Pronunciation

Fatimid

/ˈfædəˌmɪd//ˈfadəˌmid/