Definition of Dundee marmalade in English:

Dundee marmalade

noun

  • A type of orange marmalade, originally made in Dundee.

    • ‘The Jam industry, particularly the famous Dundee marmalade, has also gone the way of Jute.’
    • ‘It looks as though I'm going to have to accept that I'm not going to get any more Dundee marmalade.’
    • ‘Don't forget to sample the traditional Scottish fayre whilst you are here in Dundee, for breakfast you could try some white pudding or Dundee marmalade.’
    • ‘There were too many to cut finely so proper Dundee marmalade, as preferred by gourmets, is coarse-cut and contains large chunks of peel.’
    • ‘Jam goes back to 1797 when a Mrs Keiller put Dundee marmalade on the world's breakfast tables, while at the same time Dundee was turning itself into the jute capital of the world with uses running from shipbuilding to whaling.’
    • ‘You're most likely to be spreading Dundee marmalade if it has a jelly consistency and contains shredded peel.’
    • ‘There's always a jar of Dundee marmalade in my refrigerator.’
    • ‘They have been producing high quality preserves and marmalade in the Dundee area since 1938 and are the only remaining producer of Dundee marmalade, located beside the birthplace of this world famous product.’
    • ‘With sponsorship from them we could offer a good spread of prizes, with everyone going home armed with commemorative Dundee marmalade and jam plus store credits for all the winners of 4 or more games.’
    • ‘When the remnants of the it seemed to face destruction, Alexander donned his smartest breeches and finest boots, sat down to breakfast in a shell-shattered house, at a table with a spotless cloth, and calmly consumed Dundee marmalade.’
    • ‘When none is specified, orange marmalade is now usually meant; this may then be prefixed by a word denoting the style or type of orange marmalade, as diabetic, Dundee marmalade.’
    • ‘Marmalade was a Scottish invention and James Keiller's Dundee marmalade was actually a product of the world's first marmalade factory, located in Great Britain, in 1797.’